Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-03-2011, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,869 posts, read 16,313,683 times
Reputation: 29240

Advertisements

I traded my cheap builder's gas stove for a Frigidaire Gallery five-burner Energy Star unit last year and it's saving a lot of gas. Using different-sized pots with appropriately matched burners really makes a difference. The high-heat burner boils pasta water and tea pots in so much less time. And the convection aspect of the oven makes baking more efficient. You set the temp at 25 degrees less than the recipe calls for, and the item is also finished in less time than the recipe specifies.

I also have a Wolfgang Puck rice cooker appliance (about $35 from HSN) that's economical to use for many recipes. In addition to cooking rice with a teeny amount of electricity much faster than it cooks on the stove, I can also use it as a slow-cooker. And while it can't be compared to a true pressure cooker, the contents are under some pressure, so anything heats faster than on a stove. What I like most about the rice function is that it has separate buttons for white and brown rice. Since I cook brown rice a lot, I can do it using a lot less energy with this device and clean-up is easier, too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-06-2011, 07:32 AM
 
Location: San Diego California
6,795 posts, read 7,286,310 times
Reputation: 5194
There is a device that you can use to turn a chest freezer into a chest refrigerator at an energy savings of about 70 - 90% over a typical upright refrigerator. It is a thermostat you plug the freezer into inline between the plug and the wall socket, and run a temp probe under the door and into the freezer compartment. In areas like mine where electric rates are high, you can save $300 to $400 a year.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-15-2011, 01:47 AM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
3,718 posts, read 5,694,650 times
Reputation: 1480
Quote:
Originally Posted by PastTense01 View Post
I would suggest a Kill-a-Watt meter to measure how much electricity your electrical devices are using (you can get it at places like Amazon, etc). Some devices operate intermittently like refrigerators and this device measures electrical usage (KWH) over time. For example I estimated my refrigerator was costing $130 a year, so I replaced it with one using less than $50 worth of electricity a year.
Can't you get those through ThinkGeek?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2011, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
3,718 posts, read 5,694,650 times
Reputation: 1480
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joke Insurance View Post
Can't you get those through ThinkGeek?
Nevermind. Just answered my own question:

ThinkGeek :: Kill-A-Watt

Unless this is not it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2011, 10:13 PM
 
10,114 posts, read 19,397,515 times
Reputation: 17444
Quote:
Originally Posted by PastTense01 View Post
Many electrical devices consume electricity all the time even though they are off (TVs, etc). What you can do is put them on power strips to stop this stealth electrical usage--when you shut off the power strip it shuts off the electrical usage completely.

I would suggest a Kill-a-Watt meter to measure how much electricity your electrical devices are using (you can get it at places like Amazon, etc). Some devices operate intermittently like refrigerators and this device measures electrical usage (KWH) over time. For example I estimated my refrigerator was costing $130 a year, so I replaced it with one using less than $50 worth of electricity a year.

But if you kill your TV, computer, etc, you lose all your settings when you turn them back on
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2011, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 86,941,000 times
Reputation: 36644
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
But if you kill your TV, computer, etc, you lose all your settings when you turn them back on
If I power down my computer by pulling the plug out of the wall, it reboots exactly as if I had used the start button, but doesn't offer to restore programs (browser tabs and history) that were running at the time of shutdown. If I power down my internet modem, it takes a minute or two to restore.

It can take an hour or so for my cable converter box to fully restore, but after a power failure, I never have to reprogram my TV, and most cable box features function normally right away after powering back up. When I plug my TV back in, it's still on the same channel, same volume, same screen aspect, same color settings, same presets, everything the same.

Last edited by jtur88; 06-28-2011 at 11:43 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2011, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Florida !
222 posts, read 500,772 times
Reputation: 231
I bought one of those little toaster ovens. Since I enjoy baking it has got to be saving money and energy. It broils, toasts and bakes. I hardly ever use my big oven. I also have a solar oven. It works but takes time getting use to cooking times.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2011, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
3,718 posts, read 5,694,650 times
Reputation: 1480
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shellsandwater View Post
I bought one of those little toaster ovens. Since I enjoy baking it has got to be saving money and energy. It broils, toasts and bakes. I hardly ever use my big oven. I also have a solar oven. It works but takes time getting use to cooking times.
How different is the solar oven from the big oven?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-18-2011, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
3,718 posts, read 5,694,650 times
Reputation: 1480
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shellsandwater View Post
I bought one of those little toaster ovens. Since I enjoy baking it has got to be saving money and energy. It broils, toasts and bakes. I hardly ever use my big oven. I also have a solar oven. It works but takes time getting use to cooking times.
Ignore my last post. I made a typo. Here is what I meant to say:

How is that different from a conventional oven?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-11-2012, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
3,718 posts, read 5,694,650 times
Reputation: 1480
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
But if you kill your TV, computer, etc, you lose all your settings when you turn them back on
You must be doing it wrong. My settings have always saved.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top