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Old 05-18-2011, 05:06 PM
 
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Hipsters on food stamps - Pinched: Tales from an Economic Downturn - Salon.com
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Old 05-18-2011, 05:54 PM
 
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About half of his friends in Baltimore have been getting food stamps since the economy toppled, so he decided to give it a try; to his delight, he qualified for $200 a month.

"I'm sort of a foodie, and I'm not going to do the 'living off ramen' thing," he said, fondly remembering a recent meal he'd prepared of roasted rabbit with butter, tarragon and sweet potatoes.

when did we come to this kind of entitlement mentality as a country?

of course, the real tragedy here is this:

But general unemployment figures among the group are stark: Between the ends of 2007 and 2009, unemployment among those aged 20 to 34 rose 100 percent, and between 2006 and 2009, unemployment among those with a bachelor's degree or higher was up 179 percent.
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Old 05-18-2011, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 21,870,050 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sskkc View Post
That's amazing. I cook for 4 people, from scratch or semi-scratch and don't remember the last time I saw a whole chicken for less than $1.19/lb (Typically a 3-4 lb bird would cost $4-5 here) Who would pay $1.29 for a can of green beans? They are less than a dollar everywhere here - but even at our local Farmer's Markets (open NOT every month of the year -23 cents for how many? 3 beans? My grocery budget is typically about $800-900/month - depending on various specials I can find.

Who would pay $6.99 for boneless chicken breasts? Even in the frozen section, a 3lb pound bag goes for less than $8 generally. We must live in VERY different parts of the country.

And, as you've posted, you have only yourself to feed. When you have to feed more than just yourself, you'll see it's harder. Really. Doing the cooking and shopping for 4-5 people is much more work than cooking for one. In addition, a single person, with no children, has much more free/spare time at their disposal. And I'd love to meet anyone who can feed a normal pre-teen/teen boy for $150/month. Honestly, that insinuation is almost funny.

This thread is very sad.
Mircea's comments about food are right on. I raised 4 kids while working FT and made their meals from real food. Don't tell me you can't eat well on the same amount it takes to buy junk food. One lb. of chicken at $1.19 will feed four, instead of spending the same amount on Doritos or soda. One lb. of fresh green beans will feed 4-6. A half of a real potato cost what? A real yam costs what? A salad costs what? A lb. of dried lentils or beans, cooked up, will feed at least 4.

Many of these food stamp recipients are unemployed and are home a lot. What's wrong with stepping up to the stove and cooking a decent meal for the kids? Go into one of those big box discount food stores some time and check out what's in the carts of many who are paying with food stamps, truly an eye opener, and very sad for the children with obesity and heart disease and cancer at an all time high.

Last edited by RiverBird; 05-18-2011 at 08:10 PM..
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Old 05-18-2011, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 21,870,050 times
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SSKKC said: "Posted by someone who doesn't cook or do their own shopping, obviously."

That's interesting. I taught natural foods cooking classes for many years to adults and kids and have been a newspaper food columnist in the past. Family nutrition and home cooking was never a chore or that costly, even when I was working FT. One part of a year when I wasn't working (in the 70s) I rec'd food stamps and no these did not go to soda and Doritos or even canned beans nor did I deprive the kids. There are actually nutritious and delicious snacks and desserts for kids. Preparing decent meals was a matter of priorities and conscience as a parent.
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Old 05-19-2011, 01:24 AM
 
Location: North
858 posts, read 1,791,738 times
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Without getting into the other issues w/ foodstamps, I've noticed that most people that have them don't really know how to handle money (even food money) and/or how to cook nutritiously. A while ago, I read an article about a woman w/ 1 kid, getting $600/mo in FS and she said that at the end of the month, the fridge is empty and she's giving water to the kid. Meanwhile I feed my family of 5 with less than $400/mo, cooking from scratch, using sales and coupons and the pantry is overflowing.

I also know a woman w/ 6 kids that gets more than $1,000/mo and it's the same story. First 3 days of the month big grocery store run, middle of month smaller run and at the end of the month the panty and fridge are bare and she's scrambling to feed the kids, going to food banks and churches. I really can't understand it. This one doesn't buy steaks and shrimp, it's just that she's unable to budget, shop the items on sale and so on.

I really think that the foodstamps program should require beneficiaries to go to cooking healthy classes and how to shop and budget lessons. I know they are doing it in some counties. Also the amounts should be cut, I find them excessive and not really in line with what people not on FS spend on groceries.
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Old 05-20-2011, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,618 posts, read 86,428,978 times
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The number of people who are NOT on food stamps is also at an all time high. Blame it on increasing population.

By the way, the line between who needs help and who doesn't is not drawn at Starvation, nor at Scurvy. The line is drawn at a decent, adequate, nutritious diet, and if people economic hardship reduces their nutrition below good health level, it is in everyone's best interest to see that they have enough.

It doesn't help that we force single moms to go out and get jobs, which shifts their ability in the direction of junk food and convenience foods. Food stamp money is wasted, if it goes on tater tots and chef boyardee for moms who have no time to prepare proper meals because they're forced to commute to mindless jobs at low wages, leaving their children lacking in both dietary and emotional nourishment.
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Old 05-20-2011, 05:41 PM
 
14,266 posts, read 14,021,983 times
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Quote:
the objection to the food stamp program has always been the delivery system (which enables the fraud-) NOT to helping poor people eat.

i don't know one person who would object to helping their fellow americans in actual need of food.

we live in a country that has a lot of food. in my area, there are always food drives and people donate give food. the postal carriers collect food for drives as well.

i would love to see a system where people could bring their surplus food (whatever it is ) and have it distributed to those who need it-on a big scale. people feel good when they get to help others personally, and it is equally good to know that we are all in this together.

people helping each other is what it is all about.

Donating surplus food can't and won't ever take the place of a food stamp program when it comes to feeding the poor. Consider the following:

1. Donated foods that include fresh meat, fresh vegetables, bakery, and dairy products have limited shelf lives. Unless you have exactly what is needed in the right place at the right time people will either do without these commodities or there will be too much available to be used. This limits those needing food to canned goods. This will not meet nutritional needs.

2. There is no guarantee that under any voluntary system that an amount equal to real needs will be contributed. People in some areas of the country will inevitably go hungry while in other areas so much will be available it will spoil.

3. Those choosing not to contribute will "get off the hook" completely. Its hardly fair to those who bust their butts to help out. I pay my taxes for these purposes and I expect others to do so and not ***** and whine about it. Don't make the assumption everyone wants to help. I read posts from people here all the time that basically say that as long as they have their share the poor can go hungry.

4. Some staff has to be available to throw away spoiled food, accumulate the food, distribute the food, prevent theft etc. Volunteers can be obtained some of the time, but anyone who has worked with volunteers as much as I have knows that its a very undependable system. People say they will come and don't show up. Somedays you have twice as many people as you need. Other people show up and don't want to work. The food stamp program eliminates that problem by sending everyone to a grocery store where the staff is already paid.

5. There is fraud in virtually every activity. Its just a matter of how much. People cheat their employers. People cheat the government. It shouldn't happen, but its just a fact of life. When we catch it we try to deal with it by prosecuting people who do it. It does prevent some of it. If 5% of food stamps are used for the wrong purposes that's a shame, but that 5% doesn't mean we should throw out the baby with the bathwater.
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Old 05-20-2011, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Fairfield, CT
6,981 posts, read 10,859,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
The number of people who are NOT on food stamps is also at an all time high. Blame it on increasing population.

By the way, the line between who needs help and who doesn't is not drawn at Starvation, nor at Scurvy. The line is drawn at a decent, adequate, nutritious diet, and if people economic hardship reduces their nutrition below good health level, it is in everyone's best interest to see that they have enough.

It doesn't help that we force single moms to go out and get jobs, which shifts their ability in the direction of junk food and convenience foods. Food stamp money is wasted, if it goes on tater tots and chef boyardee for moms who have no time to prepare proper meals because they're forced to commute to mindless jobs at low wages, leaving their children lacking in both dietary and emotional nourishment.
Now you've hit on a different issue - the working mother issue. Many married mothers have to work and face these same issues. I grew up with a (married) stay at home mom, and I think that's a lot nicer than the typical arrangement today. But it's politically untenable to subsidize single mothers staying home when most married mothers have to work.
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Old 05-20-2011, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,618 posts, read 86,428,978 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dazzleman View Post
Now you've hit on a different issue - the working mother issue. Many married mothers have to work and face these same issues. I grew up with a (married) stay at home mom, and I think that's a lot nicer than the typical arrangement today. But it's politically untenable to subsidize single mothers staying home when most married mothers have to work.
I would question whether most married mothers "have" to work, or whether they have chosen a personal lifestyle that can only be sustained by a second income. I was raised by a stay-at-home mom, and so were my children.

I don't know the breakdown, but I would suspect that most food stamp recipients are single parents, and that is the demographic that is most widely addressed by that program. Statistically, it is possible that the higher numbers of food stamp recipients reflects the increase in the number of abandoned families, and I'm not sure it is justified to blame Obama for that.

Imagine how many more millions of mouths food stamps would be feeding, if there had been no abortions in the past 15 years.
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Old 05-22-2011, 05:05 PM
 
12,867 posts, read 14,826,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
Donating surplus food can't and won't ever take the place of a food stamp program when it comes to feeding the poor. Consider the following:

1. Donated foods that include fresh meat, fresh vegetables, bakery, and dairy products have limited shelf lives. Unless you have exactly what is needed in the right place at the right time people will either do without these commodities or there will be too much available to be used. This limits those needing food to canned goods. This will not meet nutritional needs.

2. There is no guarantee that under any voluntary system that an amount equal to real needs will be contributed. People in some areas of the country will inevitably go hungry while in other areas so much will be available it will spoil.

3. Those choosing not to contribute will "get off the hook" completely. Its hardly fair to those who bust their butts to help out. I pay my taxes for these purposes and I expect others to do so and not ***** and whine about it. Don't make the assumption everyone wants to help. I read posts from people here all the time that basically say that as long as they have their share the poor can go hungry.

4. Some staff has to be available to throw away spoiled food, accumulate the food, distribute the food, prevent theft etc. Volunteers can be obtained some of the time, but anyone who has worked with volunteers as much as I have knows that its a very undependable system. People say they will come and don't show up. Somedays you have twice as many people as you need. Other people show up and don't want to work. The food stamp program eliminates that problem by sending everyone to a grocery store where the staff is already paid.

5. There is fraud in virtually every activity. Its just a matter of how much. People cheat their employers. People cheat the government. It shouldn't happen, but its just a fact of life. When we catch it we try to deal with it by prosecuting people who do it. It does prevent some of it. If 5% of food stamps are used for the wrong purposes that's a shame, but that 5% doesn't mean we should throw out the baby with the bathwater.
i see that you put a lot of thought into that post.

what i would say is that americans are generous, but the government is even more generous with OTHER PEOPLE'S MONEY. this story about sums it up:

MICHELLE MALKIN: Adult baby syndrome- The Register Citizen

the government sector created this situation. this is what happens when a system runs amok. soldiers get housed and fed en masse and that seems to be good enough for them, so why the special treatment for the "adult baby syndrome" people, who actually contribute NOTHING to their fellow citizens?

as michelle noted, a record-breaking 12 million Americans have been added to the federal food stamp rolls over the past two years, and the bloated $6 billion AmeriCorps social justice army has been converted into a publicist corps for the welfare machine.



what we really need is a complete change in the way that social services are perceived and given in this country. what people "demand" in the future may not be either practical or available, and it would certainly be better to be prepared.

if the bureaucracy was smaller, more money would be available for actual food/goods, and we could cut down on waste at the same time. clearly, all the layers of bureaucracy don't stop any of the fraud that exists and i would suggest that it is going to be more than 5%, with over 44 million households collecting food stamps at this point in time, and the government sending out letters to encourage even NON citizens to apply for food stamps.

we need to start shifting away from government being "daddy" to start helping each other out. if the mindset would start to change, that would be the first step.

for a small example,
you have extra vegetables, share them with your neighbors. (a lot of local thrift stores have free bread, donuts, goods that area merchants donate for the needy). if people can get to a grocery store, they can get to a distribution site.
you know how to grow vegetables, teach a class at your library.
you have extra seeds or plants, pass them out.
meals on wheels is a great program that distributes actual meals to those in need.

there would be so much more SATISFACTION if people all started helping each other out. it is a great feeling to know that you made a difference, and government takes that away from all of us.

for the poster who knocked chef-boyardee i respectfully disagree-good food and 5 little meatballs in every can.

Last edited by floridasandy; 05-22-2011 at 05:40 PM..
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