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Old 06-19-2011, 06:58 AM
 
3,327 posts, read 4,357,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I think there is a disconnect, and the two do not flow, even though there might be an overlap.

Frugality is making reasoned choices about expenditures of money in terms of the value that can arise from the spending. On the other hand, being a cheap bastard stems as a form of greed, in which a person seeks to amass as much money (as well as personal favor) as possible, through the minimization of outlay.

The distinction is social, rather than economic. The frugal person is often quite generous with his money, when he sees where it can buy benefits even for others. The frugal person offers money, when someone has given something and not requested payment in return. The frugal person will loan money, with no expectation it will be paid back. Conversely, the cheap bastard thinks he has gotten away with something, if he can get something for nothing even from a needy person.

The cheap bastard will have a garage sale, and refuse to sell something if he can't get his price. The frugal person would set his junk out with a sign on the curb that says "Free".

Why would anybody throw out yesterday's coffee, when all you need to do is add water to the grounds and reheat it? I can usually get three days out of mine. Not throwing away something that can still be used is not cheap, it's frugal. Not eating food and letting it be thrown away is neither cheap nor frugal, it is stupid and wasteful.
This is a great definition and spot on.

I'd also say that frugality turns into cheapness when your quality of life is negatively impacted.
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Old 06-19-2011, 08:16 AM
 
Location: zippidy doo dah
915 posts, read 1,625,210 times
Reputation: 1992
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I think there is a disconnect, and the two do not flow, even though there might be an overlap.

Frugality is making reasoned choices about expenditures of money in terms of the value that can arise from the spending. On the other hand, being a cheap bastard stems as a form of greed, in which a person seeks to amass as much money (as well as personal favor) as possible, through the minimization of outlay.

The distinction is social, rather than economic. The frugal person is often quite generous with his money, when he sees where it can buy benefits even for others. The frugal person offers money, when someone has given something and not requested payment in return. The frugal person will loan money, with no expectation it will be paid back. Conversely, the cheap bastard thinks he has gotten away with something, if he can get something for nothing even from a needy person.

The cheap bastard will have a garage sale, and refuse to sell something if he can't get his price. The frugal person would set his junk out with a sign on the curb that says "Free".


Why would anybody throw out yesterday's coffee, when all you need to do is add water to the grounds and reheat it? I can usually get three days out of mine. Not throwing away something that can still be used is not cheap, it's frugal. Not eating food and letting it be thrown away is neither cheap nor frugal, it is stupid and wasteful.
4

The cheap bastard will have a garage sale, and refuse to sell something if he can't get his price. The frugal person would set his junk out with a sign on the curb that says "Free".

I have to disagree with this, particularly in today's economy. People don't have garage/yard/estate sales simply to get rid of stuff or clean out worthless items. Quite often, the seller needs the money to live on. Often people put out things of value at a price that is they have carefully considered and it is a good deal for someone else. I've sold many items at yard sales that were expensive items but at least I didn't feel as horrid at what I sold them for and the buyer got a wonderful thing for less than they would have anywhere else. Everyone won! Everyone was happy!

Frankly, the person who demands you sell at the price they offer or who thinks you should just give it away could be categorized as the "cheap bastard" but I wouldn't want to be judgmental......i don't know their story either. But I know some of the biggest hagglers for freebies or cheapies turn around and sell them at greatly inflated prices in their little shops....and yard sales.....

So, in defense of those who stick by their price, I tip my hat to you. During the Depression, my great-uncle was offered a rediculously low sum of money for a beautiful piece of furniture, dating back to the 1850's. When he declined to make the sale, the potential buyer suggested that "something is better than nothing." To which he responded, "I'd sooner burn it." The piece sits in my bedroom today. Thanks, Uncle George (and i don't think you're a cheap bastard)
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Old 06-19-2011, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Metro Detroit, Michigan
29,817 posts, read 24,898,335 times
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I reuse tin foil... That's pretty damn cheap, but I do tip well at restaurants Too bad I eat out very rarely.
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