Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-23-2012, 03:00 AM
 
106,637 posts, read 108,790,719 times
Reputation: 80122

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by 007.5 View Post
We dont even need to buy toliet paper ; theres enough leaves on tree branches . Lets get back to nature and save money.
just use enough toilet paper to clean out your finger nails ha ha ha
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-24-2012, 09:19 PM
 
Location: On the Ohio River in Western, KY
3,387 posts, read 6,626,728 times
Reputation: 3362
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4rummer View Post
My question is - Are you or have you met someone cheaper?!!!
Oh yeah, I know quite a few tightwads around here, and they are borderline gross in their race to save a penny.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chuck_steak View Post
I have a friend who washes plastic bags (Ziplocs) and reuses them to the point that they have holes in them and STILL uses them anyway. Isn't the whole point of plastic bags to keep the food fresh? I don't know how they keep food fresh with holes in them.
We do that, and when they get too holey, I take them outside and fill them with soil and start plants in them. They already have drainage holes in them, and they are easy to transplant and grow just was well as the expensive starter kits they sell in the store.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ragnarkar View Post
To me, it makes little sense to put a lot of effort into cutting back on the small things if you haven't made an honest effort to cut back on the big ticket items first like:

Housing
Cars
Vacations
House we rent, and it's one of the cheapest in the area, truck has been paid off since we got it, and since it's almost 20yrs old, the insurance and taxes are super cheap, and vacations; what's a vacation, lol!

Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Well, then I would have wet used handkerchiefs laying around, unless I used a clean one every time, in which case I would need to buy hundreds of them and do a laundry load of nothing but hankies. I do use cloth napkins (dish-towels) at the dining table, of course. I have never bought a roll of paper towels in my life.
Naw, you only need a few actually. When one gets dirty, rinse it out in the sink with a bit of soap, and let it dry out. I have always used hankies and always will. The only time I haven't used a hankie was when I was at the hospital for a 43 day stay due to pneumonia. Then the tissues were a lifesaver; since I couldn't get out of bed to clean the massive amounts of blood and tissue I was expelling, lol.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
All five of my boys wore cloth diapers. I've never understood why everyone is so resistant to using them but they are a HUGE cost saver - especially if you line dry them.

A roll of paper towels usually lasts me at least two months, sometimes three, depending on the size of the roll, because we use cloth napkins and I use rags for almost all clean up. I've also been known to use the pages out of old phone books and newspapers for messy clean ups. I do use paper towels for draining bacon and a few clean ups.
I loved cloth diapers, and still have a few around here that we used when the youngest was a baby. They are great for cleaning delicate stuff and storing silver.

As for the bacon, you need a bacon tree! You just drape the cooked bacon over the 'limbs' and it drips the fat off the meat, and collects it so you can use the grease later. My MIL has one and swares by it!

Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
Wouldn't you save time by just rebuying plastig bags and tin foil? Washing it doesn't seem all that frugal in terms of invested time.

Or do you guys have your help wash them for you?
No. It doesn't take much more time to wash the foil or bags, than you would take washing dishes anyway.

As for someone helping me, yup. I have kiddos for that, lol!

Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
I mean, it doesn't take much of your time if you hire a cleaning lady and have her wash your ziploc bags and foil as well.

I'm trying to understand how it's time-effective to reuse these items.
A cleaning lady charges $10/hr (on average) in this area, and why pay someone that money (I can't afford to pay anyway) when I can do it myself, or have the kiddo do it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bayarea4 View Post
I use old worn out washcloths, dishcloths or cotton socks for cleaning jobs instead of wasting paper towels. When they get dirty, throw them in the laundry, wash and reuse. Dry washcloths are great for cleaning windows and mirrors; I actually like them better than paper towels.
I use all the old t shirts, undies, socks, etc... as cleaning cloths when their original use has worn out. Like hubby's old work t shirts, they aren't even decent enough to sleep in with HUGE holes in them, so I cut them into sections and use them for rags.

I though everyone did that?!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
I also made all my own baby food. Through five kids, I never, ever - not once - bought a jar of baby food. I did give them the commercial "starter" cereals - rice, etc. I also breast fed and never bought a can of formula. I got behind someone once in the grocery checkout line who was buying formula and I was shocked at what they paid for a few cans of the stuff.
ROFL, I thought I was the only one that did that, lol! My family was astounded that I would work to do that when I could just buy it off the store shelf; till my great-grandma got involved, SHE laid the smack down and told them all off (it was so funny watching her (4'10" and 87yrs old) laying into my aunts and uncles (one of whom was over 6'5" and in his 40's) that she was proud of me for being frugal and actually caring about what I fed my child, lol! G-d I miss her!

Like you, the one "baby food" I bought was the cereal flakes stuff, and mixed it into breast milk and smushed foods, and she tore it up, lol!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2012, 09:29 PM
 
Location: On the Ohio River in Western, KY
3,387 posts, read 6,626,728 times
Reputation: 3362
Quote:
Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
My favorite frugal tip is to buy candy at the after holiday sales. One year I was able to buy several big bags of M&Ms after Christmas for 75% off. I used the red ones for Valentine's Day treats and the green ones for St. Patrick's Day treats. I am really excited because this year I was able to buy enough Dum Dum Suckers & Nerds for about nine months of family & school use for 90% off. Wow! I'm in heaven!
Now, if I could just get my husband to quit smoking----it costs us about $75 a week, YIKES!
Oh yeah, I do buy up post holiday candy. It stays good for a while ans long as it is left ina cool dry area. I put it in the bottom of my closet to store.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2012, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Bergen County, NJ
1,602 posts, read 4,159,256 times
Reputation: 1851
HA HA HA !!!!

Only use 3 squares at a time of the Charmin to wipe your butt ... Remember, if you don't wipe good, you'll have itchy a$$.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2012, 09:54 PM
 
4,361 posts, read 7,072,655 times
Reputation: 5216
Instead of paying $4 for one greeting card, make your own greeting cards, by hand-drawing cartoons, or pretty designs, or folding a piece of paper and pasting on it pictures you've printed off off the "Google Images" website, or out of magazines, or from the front of recycled cards you've received from others, and then writing your own greeting inside. Or if you must buy cards, buy them from a "card outlet" or from a dollar-store.

I heard of someone who drives up to the hospital and goes into the lobby just to get the free coffee that they offer.

I heard of a young teacher who would drive around and pick up old furniture discarded on the curb, and then donate the furniture to a charity thrift store, and later claim a "tax deduction" based on his donation. He decided to stop this practice, after being embarrased when a student of his saw him.

Our public library has a big box in front for magazine donations, free for the public to take. Someone recently dropped off 100 national geographic magazines. I took them all, and immediately donated them to a charity thrift store (just a mile away) and claimed a tax deduction for this donation.

I buy store-brands of most groceries, if available. Including breakfast cereal.

Instead of ordering iced tea in restaurants, I bring my own powdered tea, and stir it into a free glass of ice-water.

I inflate my car tires with an upright bicycle pump, rather than pay 50 cents at a gas station.

Last edited by slowlane3; 05-24-2012 at 10:16 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2012, 02:17 AM
 
Location: In a state of denial
1,289 posts, read 3,035,085 times
Reputation: 954
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
Instead of paying $4 for one greeting card, make your own greeting cards, by hand-drawing cartoons, or pretty designs, or folding a piece of paper and pasting on it pictures you've printed off off the "Google Images" website, or out of magazines, or from the front of recycled cards you've received from others, and then writing your own greeting inside. Or if you must buy cards, buy them from a "card outlet" or from a dollar-store.

I heard of someone who drives up to the hospital and goes into the lobby just to get the free coffee that they offer.

I heard of a young teacher who would drive around and pick up old furniture discarded on the curb, and then donate the furniture to a charity thrift store, and later claim a "tax deduction" based on his donation. He decided to stop this practice, after being embarrased when a student of his saw him.

Our public library has a big box in front for magazine donations, free for the public to take. Someone recently dropped off 100 national geographic magazines. I took them all, and immediately donated them to a charity thrift store (just a mile away) and claimed a tax deduction for this donation.

I buy store-brands of most groceries, if available. Including breakfast cereal.

Instead of ordering iced tea in restaurants, I bring my own powdered tea, and stir it into a free glass of ice-water.

I inflate my car tires with an upright bicycle pump, rather than pay 50 cents at a gas station.
Doesn't it cost more in gas to drive to the hospital to get free coffee than it would to make your own?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2012, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Ontario, NY
3,516 posts, read 7,781,563 times
Reputation: 4287
Quote:
Originally Posted by KAYLINDA View Post
No need to ration the toilet paper...just ask your guests to be sure and use both sides of it. lol
I now use a lot less toilet paper than I did when I was younger. Actually I'm amazed I didn't clog the toilet when I flushed I used to use so much. Now that I have to buy my own toilet paper, not using my parents paper, I see I can get away with a pretty small sheet and if the material deposited isn't too much, it can be refolded for another use. (using both sides)

I'd say using the least amount of toilet paper is frugal, cheap is using the leaves off the trees outside instead.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2012, 10:05 AM
 
13,005 posts, read 18,901,622 times
Reputation: 9252
Historical note: Sears used to have a catalog with pages that were good for that. Folks put last year's in the outhouse. I suppose you could do that today with phone books.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2012, 02:20 PM
 
Location: In a state of denial
1,289 posts, read 3,035,085 times
Reputation: 954
Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Historical note: Sears used to have a catalog with pages that were good for that. Folks put last year's in the outhouse. I suppose you could do that today with phone books.
Yes, my husband's family had an outhouse and they used the Sears pages. Phone books are better idea...a lot softer, but they aren't as available as they used to be. Hardly anyone has a home phone anymore due to cell phones and the use of the internet to look up numbers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top