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Old 11-19-2011, 06:15 PM
 
24,488 posts, read 41,138,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
WTF?
I mean, it doesn't take much of your time if you hire a cleaning lady and have her wash your ziploc bags and foil as well.

I'm trying to understand how it's time-effective to reuse these items.
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Old 11-19-2011, 06:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilypad View Post
Ibid on that list. If the aluminum foil is not cleanable, I ball it up and give to kitty for a plaything. I thin my dish and hand soaps and they last forever. Also unplug everything unless it is being used and unplug nearly everything whenever I leave the house.
We used to use tinfoil for covering our cat food cans, but then I bought lids for them. I expect these lids to last for YEARS, and they cost me a total of $3.
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Old 11-19-2011, 06:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
I mean, it doesn't take much of your time if you hire a cleaning lady and have her wash your ziploc bags and foil as well.

I'm trying to understand how it's time-effective to reuse these items.
Most people are already handwashing some dishes, even if they use a dishwasher. Taking an extra few seconds to wash a bag or bit of foil isn't a huge waste of time or resources.
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Old 11-19-2011, 06:34 PM
 
Location: The Cascade Foothills
10,942 posts, read 10,253,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
I mean, it doesn't take much of your time if you hire a cleaning lady and have her wash your ziploc bags and foil as well.

I'm trying to understand how it's time-effective to reuse these items.
Well, I can only speak for myself....and trust me, I don't have a cleaning lady.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Emeraldmaiden View Post
Most people are already handwashing some dishes, even if they use a dishwasher. Taking an extra few seconds to wash a bag or bit of foil isn't a huge waste of time or resources.
Exactly. Maybe, what? Ten seconds at the most?

I don't do it as much as I used to because of a permanent disability I got on the job which makes doing anything with two hands difficult. Not impossible, but difficult. But I used to - all the time.
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Old 11-19-2011, 06:39 PM
 
Location: in a galaxy far far away
19,208 posts, read 16,693,063 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBest View Post
I mean, it doesn't take much of your time if you hire a cleaning lady and have her wash your ziploc bags and foil as well.

I'm trying to understand how it's time-effective to reuse these items.
Cleaning lady? I am the cleaning lady around my house. A cleaning lady would be one of those luxury items I dream about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
All five of my boys wore cloth diapers. I've never understood why everyone is so resistant to using them but they are a HUGE cost saver - especially if you line dry them.

A roll of paper towels usually lasts me at least two months, sometimes three, depending on the size of the roll, because we use cloth napkins and I use rags for almost all clean up. I've also been known to use the pages out of old phone books and newspapers for messy clean ups. I do use paper towels for draining bacon and a few clean ups.

I am a big believer in buying generic and store brands over name brands but I do make the exception with toilet paper. I have found that it pays to buy the more expensive t.p. (like Scott's) because the rolls have so much more on them. Buy the cheap stuff and it doesn't take long to empty the roll. I absolutely believe the extra money you spend for the more expensive t.p. is money well spent.
When my son was a baby, cloth diapers were all we had. By the time my daughter came along, Pampers was the only brand on the market. I bought one box and used them when we traveled to Grandma's house. Both my kids wore cloth and I felt better about having them in cloth rather than some paper thing. Ick.

Like you, I use rags for just about everything. A roll of paper towel lasts me longer than four months. I just don't use them that much. I guess it comes down to throwing money away on somethng I'm going to throw away. Just throw the money away, instead. Yes. I'm being silly here.

I'm frugal in many things but common sense tells me not to reuse some items, simply for sanitary reasons. So far, it's been working well so I don't think I'll be changing any time soon.
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Old 11-19-2011, 07:14 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
21,541 posts, read 8,724,324 times
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I use old worn out washcloths, dishcloths or cotton socks for cleaning jobs instead of wasting paper towels. When they get dirty, throw them in the laundry, wash and reuse. Dry washcloths are great for cleaning windows and mirrors; I actually like them better than paper towels.

I don't believe in rationing toilet paper, but I try to use only what I need because it's better for the environment.

My mother-in-law was the Queen of Frugal. She wore her house dresses until the pattern wore off the seat. Her slippers had holes in them, but when I bought her a new pair she put them away because she wanted to save them "for good." She cut cough drops into quarters. She also cut up junk mail and used the backs for her shopping lists.
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Old 11-19-2011, 09:49 PM
 
Location: The Cascade Foothills
10,942 posts, read 10,253,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HereOnMars View Post


When my son was a baby, cloth diapers were all we had. By the time my daughter came along, Pampers was the only brand on the market. I bought one box and used them when we traveled to Grandma's house. Both my kids wore cloth and I felt better about having them in cloth rather than some paper thing. Ick.
You must have had your daughter around the time I had my first son - 1975? If I remember correctly, disposable diapers had just come on the market and, yes, I remember Pampers being the only brand. Back then, they were such a novelty, and people thought they were THE greatest invention ever, so people tended to think I was a little nutty for using "old fashioned" cloth diapers.

I also made all my own baby food. Through five kids, I never, ever - not once - bought a jar of baby food. I did give them the commercial "starter" cereals - rice, etc. I also breast fed and never bought a can of formula. I got behind someone once in the grocery checkout line who was buying formula and I was shocked at what they paid for a few cans of the stuff.

But back to the t.p. issue - for the really die hard tightwads, there is a thing known as the "family cloth." I have read about them on other forums and those who use them, swear by them. Rags instead of t.p. and a bucket (diaper pail?) of water in the bathroom to soak them in.

Last edited by Cinebar; 11-19-2011 at 10:53 PM..
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Old 11-19-2011, 10:08 PM
 
15,638 posts, read 26,256,044 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post
Flat surface (drainboard) and a soapy sponge. Squeegee out from the middle. Quick rinse under the faucet.
Thanks -- very logical. No wonder I couldn't wrap my head around that!

I was thinking about putting in the sink like washing my dishes.
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Old 11-19-2011, 10:17 PM
 
24,488 posts, read 41,138,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
Well, I can only speak for myself....and trust me, I don't have a cleaning lady.
Quote:
Originally Posted by HereOnMars View Post
Cleaning lady? I am the cleaning lady around my house. A cleaning lady would be one of those luxury items I dream about.
I wouldn't be able to get myself to do that. I generally don't wash dishes by hand.
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Old 11-19-2011, 11:17 PM
 
Location: in a galaxy far far away
19,208 posts, read 16,693,063 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
You must have had your daughter around the time I had my first son - 1975?
Yes, '75. My son was born in '72. When he was born, cloth diapers was the only thing on the market ... cloth diapers, plastic pants and diaper pins. I stuck myself plenty of times before I got the hang of it. We had a washing machine but no dryer so I hung every single diaper on the line. That usually meant I was washing nearly every day so I didn't end up with 100 diapers on the line. One thing about those cloth diapers. When they were no longer needed and still in fairly good condition, they made great dusting rags.
Spoiler
My gosh, I just remembered a funny story about that. One particular morning, I opened the diaper pail and began putting the diapers in the washer. I came across a diaper that had tiny splinters of wood in it. Confused and alarmed, and also wondering what my son had ingested, I tossed it out (not wanting the wood transferring to the rest). When my (now ex) hubby got home, I told him the story of what I'd found. He sheepishly grinned and told me that it was his fault. It seems that on Sunday morning, in an attempt to give me a break and let me sleep in, he got our son up in the morning but found he had a "dirty" diaper. Not wanting to rinse it out in the toilet - which was the norm - he took it outside, draped it on the fence and hosed it off. When he was sure all traces of the mess were gone, he wrung it out and put it in the diaper pail ... and never mentioned it to me. It was pretty funny to see a big, strong man afraid of getting a little baby poop on his hands. Although I thought his effort was sweet, it made me laugh. Still does.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
I also made all my own baby food. Through five kids, I never, ever - not once - bought a jar of baby food. I did give them the commercial "starter" cereals - rice, etc. I also breast fed and never bought a can of formula. I got behind someone once in the grocery checkout line who was buying formula and I was shocked at what they paid for a few cans of the stuff.
Wow! Me, too!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
But back to the t.p. issue - for the really die hard tightwads, there is a thing known as the "family cloth." I have read about them on other forums and those who use them, swear by them. Rags instead of t.p. and a bucket (diaper pail?) of water in the bathroom to soak them in.
I'd have to down to my last dime to ever consider the "family cloth." That seems like an extreme measure in order to be frugal, imo. But hey! Whatever floats another person's boat.
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