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Old 02-18-2012, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Northern Wisconsin
10,379 posts, read 10,839,994 times
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1Brokegirl. Isn't there someone you can share a home, apartment or other living quarters with? It seems like such a waste to have to pay for all your housing costs on just one income. You might find a room or house to share with a widow lady or single woman. Lots of people just don't like to live alone. In most cities rooms to rent are advertised in the paper or Craiglist.
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Old 02-18-2012, 07:48 PM
 
43,011 posts, read 107,622,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prairieparson View Post
I've heard on several forums that moving outside the country, at this point in time, isn't all that great an alternative. Why?. Because property bought right, can be as cheap in the USA as in many foreign countries, assuming you want the same amenities. Any other suggestions would be appreciated. I'm still forming a plan.
Please research it before quickly dismissing it. Property isn't the only expense. I can buy property cheaply in my area. But there are many other expenses that are much cheaper in third world countries. Property tax is zero or next to nothing. Utilities are cheaper. Food is cheaper. I can't take a bus for a quarter here in the states, but I could in Costa Rica. A bus ride to the other side of the country is only $5. Costa Rica has extremely affordable socialized medicine with doctors educated in the United States. To put the cost of living into perspective, you can have a full time housekeeper for $100/month. If the locals can live $100/month, you most certainly can live well on social security. I only used Costa Rica as an example because that's what was hot when I was research but it is getting a tad more expensive to get a visa there. Still affordable but it requires more of an investment. I'm focusing on other countries too.
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Old 02-20-2012, 07:07 AM
 
304 posts, read 614,298 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prairieparson View Post
1Brokegirl. Isn't there someone you can share a home, apartment or other living quarters with? It seems like such a waste to have to pay for all your housing costs on just one income. You might find a room or house to share with a widow lady or single woman. Lots of people just don't like to live alone. In most cities rooms to rent are advertised in the paper or Craiglist.
I rent a room now. If I had a house with housemates, I would probably be paying much more.
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Old 02-20-2012, 11:10 AM
 
Location: A Nation Possessed
25,263 posts, read 18,412,401 times
Reputation: 22102
If your income is location independent (from what I gather, it will be), you could consider moving to a small rural town in an out-of-the-way place. Building lots can be had for less than $1000 (I know, because I own one). You can then build a small home for very cheap in areas like this because the local governments are not going to try to fleece you with permits, size regulations, etc. Depending on the type of construction, it can be pretty darn cheap (and very well-built). This is what I've been working towards doing, and I'm getting pretty close to moving on it. Once you are there and in the home, the taxes in these areas are incredibly small (I paid $12 last year, and when the home is built, I'll be paying less than $100). Utilities are fairly cheap in these areas as well. Where are these areas? Generally in the rural areas of the northern plains states and upper great lakes region.

The down sides: You've got to like or be able to tolerate cold winters. If you are a socialite type of person, it's not a good match. No operas. No symphonies within a five hour drive (but you may get some good folk or bluegrass at the park on Saturday afternoons). You will have to travel longer distances for Walmarts and such. There aren't as many social services in these areas and you would need to be somewhat independent and self-sufficient. But the nice thing is that most of these areas are beautiful, wide open, and untouched by the asphalt jungles. Lot's of clean air and nature. There are plenty of areas like this if you look for them. Generally, the prices are very low in towns with a population of less than about 2000. The town that my lot is in has a population of about 150 with a town of 1500 about ten miles down the highway. It has everything I could want or need. Of course, it's not for everyone. Your mileage may vary. But, in general, look to smaller towns--they almost always have smaller living expense as well.
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Old 02-20-2012, 05:06 PM
 
304 posts, read 614,298 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisC View Post
If your income is location independent (from what I gather, it will be), you could consider moving to a small rural town in an out-of-the-way place. Building lots can be had for less than $1000 (I know, because I own one). You can then build a small home for very cheap in areas like this because the local governments are not going to try to fleece you with permits, size regulations, etc. Depending on the type of construction, it can be pretty darn cheap (and very well-built). This is what I've been working towards doing, and I'm getting pretty close to moving on it. Once you are there and in the home, the taxes in these areas are incredibly small (I paid $12 last year, and when the home is built, I'll be paying less than $100). Utilities are fairly cheap in these areas as well. Where are these areas? Generally in the rural areas of the northern plains states and upper great lakes region.

The down sides: You've got to like or be able to tolerate cold winters. If you are a socialite type of person, it's not a good match. No operas. No symphonies within a five hour drive (but you may get some good folk or bluegrass at the park on Saturday afternoons). You will have to travel longer distances for Walmarts and such. There aren't as many social services in these areas and you would need to be somewhat independent and self-sufficient. But the nice thing is that most of these areas are beautiful, wide open, and untouched by the asphalt jungles. Lot's of clean air and nature. There are plenty of areas like this if you look for them. Generally, the prices are very low in towns with a population of less than about 2000. The town that my lot is in has a population of about 150 with a town of 1500 about ten miles down the highway. It has everything I could want or need. Of course, it's not for everyone. Your mileage may vary. But, in general, look to smaller towns--they almost always have smaller living expense as well.
I don't know about OP, but that sounds like Heaven to me. Unfortunately, usually in those small rural towns come low wages and/or no jobs nearby.
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Old 02-20-2012, 07:47 PM
 
Location: A Nation Possessed
25,263 posts, read 18,412,401 times
Reputation: 22102
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1brokegirl View Post
I don't know about OP, but that sounds like Heaven to me. Unfortunately, usually in those small rural towns come low wages and/or no jobs nearby.
This is one of the potential down sides as well. One thing to consider though, is that with no rent, low taxes, lower utilities (assuming a small home), and no ballooning prices on the necessities, it's possible to get by on a very low wage and still be fairly comfortable. You just have to forgo a lot of the non-necessities that we consider necessities these days. Forget that Himalayan cafe and Basque restaurant... they ain't out there.
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Old 02-20-2012, 11:00 PM
 
5,089 posts, read 15,346,482 times
Reputation: 7017
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisC View Post
If your income is location independent (from what I gather, it will be), you could consider moving to a small rural town in an out-of-the-way place. Building lots can be had for less than $1000 (I know, because I own one). You can then build a small home for very cheap in areas like this because the local governments are not going to try to fleece you with permits, size regulations, etc. Depending on the type of construction, it can be pretty darn cheap (and very well-built). This is what I've been working towards doing, and I'm getting pretty close to moving on it. Once you are there and in the home, the taxes in these areas are incredibly small (I paid $12 last year, and when the home is built, I'll be paying less than $100). Utilities are fairly cheap in these areas as well. Where are these areas? Generally in the rural areas of the northern plains states and upper great lakes region.

The down sides: You've got to like or be able to tolerate cold winters. If you are a socialite type of person, it's not a good match. No operas. No symphonies within a five hour drive (but you may get some good folk or bluegrass at the park on Saturday afternoons). You will have to travel longer distances for Walmarts and such. There aren't as many social services in these areas and you would need to be somewhat independent and self-sufficient. But the nice thing is that most of these areas are beautiful, wide open, and untouched by the asphalt jungles. Lot's of clean air and nature. There are plenty of areas like this if you look for them. Generally, the prices are very low in towns with a population of less than about 2000. The town that my lot is in has a population of about 150 with a town of 1500 about ten miles down the highway. It has everything I could want or need. Of course, it's not for everyone. Your mileage may vary. But, in general, look to smaller towns--they almost always have smaller living expense as well.
I like your post because I like the ideals of your post. However, with all ideals comes reality and that is what will bring up the costs of living in these small towns.

First, the cost for transportation will be more because you will not have adequate public transit. Fine when you are young and working but a difficult problem when you are older, retired with a reduced income and can no longer drive. In some areas, you will not have the basic necessities that are nearby, you will have to drive or be driven.

Healthcare is always a problem but more of a problem as you age. When you reach Medicare, you will find much less options for supplemental plans in these rural areas because there is not a dense enough patient base. What you will find will be more costly type plans or no plans because there will not be providers nearby. Now, being older and not being able to drive, you will have more difficulty in getting to more distant medical providers and you will need them more.

Products to buy will be more because there is less competition of products available. That will include food products. Yes, some other fixed costs will be less, as for land, as you indicate because there is much less demand.

Yes, these towns can have all that you want and need--when you are young but will be deficient when you are older and your wants and needs change.

I am not saying not to move to a small town but there is some realities that most be taken into consideration. I have looked long and hard at small towns and have been envious of people living in them but I know I can never survive on what little I have and with my severe medical problems in these towns. I can now, if I wish, not own a car, because there is excellent public transit. Healthcare is very closely with many choices in Medicare. I can walk to a store for basic needs. So, this is where I have to stay.

Livecontent
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Old 02-20-2012, 11:35 PM
 
Location: A Nation Possessed
25,263 posts, read 18,412,401 times
Reputation: 22102
Quote:
Originally Posted by livecontent View Post
I like your post because I like the ideals of your post. However, with all ideals comes reality and that is what will bring up the costs of living in these small towns.

First, the cost for transportation will be more because you will not have adequate public transit. Fine when you are young and working but a difficult problem when you are older, retired with a reduced income and can no longer drive. In some areas, you will not have the basic necessities that are nearby, you will have to drive or be driven.

Healthcare is always a problem but more of a problem as you age. When you reach Medicare, you will find much less options for supplemental plans in these rural areas because there is not a dense enough patient base. What you will find will be more costly type plans or no plans because there will not be providers nearby. Now, being older and not being able to drive, you will have more difficulty in getting to more distant medical providers and you will need them more.

Products to buy will be more because there is less competition of products available. That will include food products. Yes, some other fixed costs will be less, as for land, as you indicate because there is much less demand.

Yes, these towns can have all that you want and need--when you are young but will be deficient when you are older and your wants and needs change.

I am not saying not to move to a small town but there is some realities that most be taken into consideration. I have looked long and hard at small towns and have been envious of people living in them but I know I can never survive on what little I have and with my severe medical problems in these towns. I can now, if I wish, not own a car, because there is excellent public transit. Healthcare is very closely with many choices in Medicare. I can walk to a store for basic needs. So, this is where I have to stay.

Livecontent
Yes, health and "independence" of movement can be an issue. Not really advisable for those with health or mobility issues to be out in small town America or in rural areas. But it is an option for those who are healthy and headstrong enough to make it work. Not for everyone, but an option for some.
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Old 02-21-2012, 12:20 AM
 
5,089 posts, read 15,346,482 times
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Originally Posted by ChrisC View Post
Yes, health and "independence" of movement can be an issue. Not really advisable for those with health or mobility issues to be out in small town America or in rural areas. But it is an option for those who are healthy and headstrong enough to make it work. Not for everyone, but an option for some.
I should say that I am being unfair to many great small towns that provide excellent service to their elderly. You will see many of the elderly who were born, raised and worked in small rural areas and do not want to leave, nor would I. The counties and municipalities provide senior housing in the center of these small towns and elderly public transit. That will bring them closer to shopping amenities and healthcare and still give them part of that rural lifestyle they enjoyed and made possible. We should continue to support those programs for the rural elderly including more subsidized healthcare. For the maintenance of the population in Rural America is very important.

Livecontent
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Old 02-23-2012, 10:46 PM
 
4,338 posts, read 7,488,905 times
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Live with family and/or roomates.
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