Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-08-2013, 02:47 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
32,669 posts, read 48,139,958 times
Reputation: 78516

Advertisements

It does not save any money to buy cheaply made junk that is going to fall apart quickly. Often, the most frugal way to live is to buy quality that will last for decades so that you don't have to replace it next month.

They say it costs a lot less to be rich than it costs to be poor. That's true. There are several reasons for that, but one of the reasons is that the wealthy buy quality.

Mr Gotbucks pays $500 for a well made pair of leather boots with a leather sole that is stitched on, and he can wear those boots for 20 years and pass them on to his son. He takes good care of the boots and has them resoled when needed.

You buy cheap shoes for $20 and the sole come unglued 2 month later. You throw them away and buy another pair that last 2 month.

Do the math. Who has really paid more for their shoes?

The same with tools, and cars, and even clothing. Buy something that will last and you will save money over time. Not to mention that it is pretty darn nice to have stuff that works when you need it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-08-2013, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
17,220 posts, read 57,129,353 times
Reputation: 18588
This is true. Buying the cheapest item available at Wally World or similar usually does not give the lowest overall cost of ownership, not to mention that a cheap tool is likely to fail at an inconvenient time.

Part of being frugal is to know what to buy used. I love to buy wrenches, sockets etc. used, pick through the bin at the pawn shop and find the Craftsman, S-K, even Snap-On tools, buy them for about half of new price.

Shoes are a particularly bad place to cheap out - cheap shoes not only don't last, they can lead to various foot/ankle/back etc. problems.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2013, 05:32 PM
 
106,796 posts, read 109,039,935 times
Reputation: 80241
20 years ago before north face was owned by columbia they were a high end company that catered to mountain climbers and severe weather gear.

I spent 1k back then for the shell,the liner,the gortex pants and a down jacket.

Everyone thought i was insane. It is still my primary winter gear 20 years later.

I just replaced the nuptsie down jacket last year for 199 bucks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2013, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Australia
1,057 posts, read 1,692,617 times
Reputation: 1709
I totally agree.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2013, 07:41 PM
 
Location: NJ
31,771 posts, read 40,739,474 times
Reputation: 24590
if you are smart, you are looking for value. not paying top dollar for that top quality thing that will last 30 years. there are probably cheaper options (not the cheapest) that will last a very long time. plus, you also may want to consider that you probably wont want to have the same thing for 30 years. my mom is one who buys quality and throws around the idea of spending more for stuff that lasts. but my mom doesnt it keep it for long enough to really test that.

i have ikea furniture that was as cheap as ikea sells it that has lasted me 9 years at this point and its not going to break unless someone jumps on it or hits it with a blunt object. people have to be careful that they arent fooling themselves into spending more based on that bs line that you pay more for quality and something that lasts longer. its not always true or necessaru.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2013, 09:08 PM
 
6,757 posts, read 8,293,111 times
Reputation: 10152
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainNJ View Post
if you are smart, you are looking for value. not paying top dollar for that top quality thing that will last 30 years. there are probably cheaper options (not the cheapest) that will last a very long time. plus, you also may want to consider that you probably wont want to have the same thing for 30 years. my mom is one who buys quality and throws around the idea of spending more for stuff that lasts. but my mom doesnt it keep it for long enough to really test that.

i have ikea furniture that was as cheap as ikea sells it that has lasted me 9 years at this point and its not going to break unless someone jumps on it or hits it with a blunt object. people have to be careful that they arent fooling themselves into spending more based on that bs line that you pay more for quality and something that lasts longer. its not always true or necessaru.
No, most expensive does not always equal best quality, it's true. But if you buy the best quality you can afford, that's the idea.

For me and DH, we like decent quality linens. DH particularly likes nice sheets on the bed. I like huge, fluffy towels. These are not worth buying cheap, but we get the best quality we can afford, watching sales, etc. Now, washcloths? Cheap all the way, baby. Neither of us cares about washcloths, so we just buy the cheap ones that come in a ribbon-bound pack. As they get raggedy, they get demoted to cleaning cloths, then shop rags, then trash.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2013, 10:37 PM
 
2,135 posts, read 4,275,845 times
Reputation: 1688
Agreed. A lot of times the "most expensive" items you will be paying for the brand name. An Ipad might be great...but there are other just as great opportunities that are cheaper....plus I like android.

Same with Nike. Some of the prices of those shoes are ridiculous. Having cheap, crappy shoes can affect you more than just your shoes falling apart...your back...posture. but my New Balance shoes that were less than $50 are very comfortable, have lasted me over 2 years, and I wear them almost everyday. Great purchase.

Certain things though can be bought on craigslist used or cheap. Simple tools (wrench set, hammers, etc.) rarely break and you can use old ones. Fish tanks if you know how to reseal them. I bought my 180 gallon for $400....brand spankin new would be over $1000 very easily.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2013, 10:40 PM
 
48,502 posts, read 96,924,900 times
Reputation: 18305
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
It does not save any money to buy cheaply made junk that is going to fall apart quickly. Often, the most frugal way to live is to buy quality that will last for decades so that you don't have to replace it next month.

They say it costs a lot less to be rich than it costs to be poor. That's true. There are several reasons for that, but one of the reasons is that the wealthy buy quality.

Mr Gotbucks pays $500 for a well made pair of leather boots with a leather sole that is stitched on, and he can wear those boots for 20 years and pass them on to his son. He takes good care of the boots and has them resoled when needed.

You buy cheap shoes for $20 and the sole come unglued 2 month later. You throw them away and buy another pair that last 2 month.

Do the math. Who has really paid more for their shoes?

The same with tools, and cars, and even clothing. Buy something that will last and you will save money over time. Not to mention that it is pretty darn nice to have stuff that works when you need it.
Exactly why I quit buying Bg 3 cars ;they were sellign lemaon they knew about and as workers later admitted letttig the deal deal with it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2013, 09:35 AM
 
47,525 posts, read 69,752,438 times
Reputation: 22474
I agree.

I was one who was unwisely frugal when it came to shoes. I bought cheap shoes and ended up with plantar fasciitis until I almost couldn't walk and was ready to spend money on a podiatrist. Instead I decided to try expensive shoes and bought a pair of Berkenstock shoes and all foot problems went away. I was also having back and neck pains that went away with the better made and more expensive shoes.

It's like when you're building a house. It can be frugal to save on replaceable items like carpet or linoleum but it's frugal when it comes to the foundation.

You might buy a poorly fitting suit at Goodwill to go to a job interview when something a little more expensive will give you a much better appearance.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2013, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Vallejo
21,886 posts, read 25,201,372 times
Reputation: 19110
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
It does not save any money to buy cheaply made junk that is going to fall apart quickly. Often, the most frugal way to live is to buy quality that will last for decades so that you don't have to replace it next month.

They say it costs a lot less to be rich than it costs to be poor. That's true. There are several reasons for that, but one of the reasons is that the wealthy buy quality.

Mr Gotbucks pays $500 for a well made pair of leather boots with a leather sole that is stitched on, and he can wear those boots for 20 years and pass them on to his son. He takes good care of the boots and has them resoled when needed.

You buy cheap shoes for $20 and the sole come unglued 2 month later. You throw them away and buy another pair that last 2 month.

Do the math. Who has really paid more for their shoes?

The same with tools, and cars, and even clothing. Buy something that will last and you will save money over time. Not to mention that it is pretty darn nice to have stuff that works when you need it.
Likely "you" paid less.

The only way someone has a pair of boots last 20 years is if they work in a office and occasionally play dress-up and put on some cowboy inspired clothes. So, that's $500 of junk you didn't need to buy since you don't use the boots. Dressup clothes aren't really a necessity. Second, you forgot to mention that it's not free. If you're walking 100 miles a day in your boots, about what's necessary to wear out of a cheap pair of sneakers in two months, you'll be dropping $100 at least once a year to have your dressup boots worked on, and probably much more than that. My dress shoes typically get resoled every 5 years or so. I don't wear them everyday and I don't walk 100 miles. I also have sneakers (although they cost $50) that are 3-4 years old and still perfectly fine since I don't wear those daily or walk 100 miles a day either. Not much to look at anymore.

Hitting the middle ground is usually where the best value is. I'm sure a $5000 Kiton suit is going to last a bit longer than the crap you can pickup at Mens' Warehouse for $200. It might even last 25 times as long, provided you don't get tired of the suit, the moths don't eat it, it doesn't get ripped or stained, or you don't get fat. But that likely depends on wear. I still have the $300 suit I bought when I was a junior in college. Expecting the Kiton to last 150 years seems... excessive. To mention nothing of present value.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top