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Old 03-29-2013, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
30,585 posts, read 25,150,871 times
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You don't have to use a spreadsheet, if you don't know how to use or obtain one. But you can sit down and itemize all your income, your obligations, and your debts. Doing that will help you see where you stand.

If possible identify where you can save money. Can you discontinue cable TV and find other ways to entertain yourself? Can you grow some of your food? Can you pool resources with a friend and do some bulk buying of necessities at Costco or Sam's? Can you eat more of your meals at home, instead of eating out? I don't know your circumstances so I can only make possible suggestions.

But I do recommend putting your finances on paper to get a feel for where you stand.
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Old 03-30-2013, 09:18 PM
 
16,393 posts, read 30,273,687 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Since we hadn't had an economic depression in a lifetime few thought it would ever happen but it did. Skilled college graduates unable to find a job for years? Housing prices declining? Interest rates on savings dropping below a percent? No, never gonna happen.
I guess that you don't remember the 1979-1982 time period when unemployment rates were higher than they are now, when interest rates on home mortgages were 12%+ on a FIXED mortgage, and a car note was closer to 17% if you had excellent credit and inflation rates were much higher.
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Old 03-30-2013, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Stephenville, Texas
1,073 posts, read 1,796,899 times
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Could you ask to go to a 4 hour shift? That way you could spread the 16 hours into four days and probably wouldn't be quite as tired.
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Old 03-31-2013, 09:41 PM
 
22,660 posts, read 24,589,306 times
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Improve your health and start working more.
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Old 04-02-2013, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Central Ohio
10,834 posts, read 14,932,942 times
Reputation: 16587
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
I guess that you don't remember the 1979-1982 time period when unemployment rates were higher than they are now, when interest rates on home mortgages were 12%+ on a FIXED mortgage, and a car note was closer to 17% if you had excellent credit and inflation rates were much higher.
That was 30 years ago and to even remember the awfulness of it you would have to be 40 years old today.

I hate to tell the anti-boomer crowd it was worse in 1981 than it has been the last five years.
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Old 04-02-2013, 11:12 AM
 
16,393 posts, read 30,273,687 times
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Originally Posted by nicet4 View Post
That was 30 years ago and to even remember the awfulness of it you would have to be 40 years old today.

I hate to tell the anti-boomer crowd it was worse in 1981 than it has been the last five years.

Back then, we would NOT complain about how bad things were in the late 70s. My father would bring out the WWII photos and the grandparents would start talking about the Great Depression.
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Old 04-02-2013, 04:02 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,091 posts, read 15,432,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
I guess that you don't remember the 1979-1982 time period when unemployment rates were higher than they are now, when interest rates on home mortgages were 12%+ on a FIXED mortgage,
I had one of those!

It was owner-carried. After a few years, I tried to re-negotiate. The guy wouldn't budge, said it was his retirement income. So my Dad paid him off, drew up a contract with me and I paid my Dad 8%.
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Old 04-02-2013, 05:53 PM
 
13,005 posts, read 18,903,092 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
I guess that you don't remember the 1979-1982 time period when unemployment rates were higher than they are now, when interest rates on home mortgages were 12%+ on a FIXED mortgage, and a car note was closer to 17% if you had excellent credit and inflation rates were much higher.
True the unemployment rate went higher. But the job market recovered quicker. Interest rates certainly higher, but that was a boon to those who had saved money. Money market funds producing double digit returns.
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Old 04-08-2013, 12:27 PM
 
30,896 posts, read 36,949,177 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Since we hadn't had an economic depression in a lifetime few thought it would ever happen but it did. Skilled college graduates unable to find a job for years? Housing prices declining? Interest rates on savings dropping below a percent? No, never gonna happen.
I guess I'm the oddball, but I just think Americans are optimistic to the point of being delusional....then they bellyache about how they're being screwed when times are bad....but the signs have been there for more than 25 years now (no job stability, rising health care & education costs, etc.). If you wait until something bad happens, it's 3x harder, and sometimes impossible, to deal with stuff.
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Old 04-08-2013, 12:30 PM
 
30,896 posts, read 36,949,177 times
Reputation: 34521
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
I guess that you don't remember the 1979-1982 time period when unemployment rates were higher than they are now, when interest rates on home mortgages were 12%+ on a FIXED mortgage, and a car note was closer to 17% if you had excellent credit and inflation rates were much higher.
It's amazing how quickly people forget that stuff. I was only a kid during that time but I remember it quite well, and we were fairly comfortable during that time (i.e. my dad didn't lose his job or anything like that).
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