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Old 11-06-2013, 10:52 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
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I'm curious... how low do you set your thermostats in the winter?

I've been experimenting and trying to make small changes in hopes of seeing some smaller electric bills.
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Old 11-06-2013, 11:24 PM
 
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DOE has done empirical testing in real households -- if you use a setback thermostat for eight hours or more you can save about 1% per degree dialed down. 10 degrees less eight for eight hours equals 10% less fuel used, going much lower than 15 degrees gets impractical as you risk the house cooling off too much and pipes freezing / more energy used to warm house...

Thermostats | Department of Energy
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Old 11-06-2013, 11:33 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
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Wintertime thermostat setting: 63 degrees Fahrenheit.
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Old 11-07-2013, 01:21 AM
 
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Well -- where I live we don't get extreme temps. But I keep mine at 65-67. It comes on at 9AM, off at 11:30 AM (when we go to work) and back on at 4PM till midnight. The low set point at night is 60 degrees. Furnace very rarely ever comes on at night.
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Old 11-07-2013, 01:52 AM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
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Normally, the thermostat is on 68-70 when someone is home and 60 if no one is. Then if I don't have house guests, I put it on 56 or so at night -- I like cold rooms for sleeping!

I just had a pellet insert installed in my living room fireplace, though, so I'm still figuring out the optimal temps. The oil furnace hasn't come on at all since I got the insert (yay!!), but it's only been a week and a half. Last night I put the insert's thermostat on 60 with the oil thermostat on 55 so it will kick in if anything goes wrong with the insert (eg running out of fuel in the middle of the night).
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Old 11-07-2013, 05:50 AM
 
Location: MMU->ABE->ATL->ASH
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From 3p-10p 69f 10p-3p 64f (1st floor) (unless I'm working from home/Weekend then 69f)

From 4a-6a 70f 6a-6p 64f 6p-10p 69f 10p-4a 66f (2nd Floor)

NatGas (in Atlanta).
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Old 11-07-2013, 07:17 AM
 
Location: Camberville
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About 60 degrees. We have oil heat in Massachusetts and even at that temp, it's over $300 a month through most of the winter. One winter when I was sick and needed to bump the temp for 2 weeks while I was also staying at home, we went through 100 gallons of oil (close to $400) in 3 weeks. This is for a 1000 square foot, top floor apartment.

Most nights, I can see my breath in my room. The room with the thermostat gets passive sunlight so the heat doesn't kick on until it's horrendously cold in the bedrooms.
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Old 11-07-2013, 07:46 AM
 
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We now set ours at 64-66 in the rooms we frequent. It is pretty comfortable with a little appropriate clothing. We have radiant heat in the floors and a tight, well insulated house. We have found that the type of heat distribution system, tightness of the home, humidity, and insulation all make a difference in how it feels.

For example while a recent house had a forced air distribution system, which we liked in the summer for A/C, we felt that it was 'drier' and more drafty than others. This resulted in us feeling a little colder. To feel similarly comfortable (clothing and activity being similar...) we might have to set it a few degrees higher.

A previous house with baseboard oil heat, and so-so (by modern standards...) insulation and draft control also required the higher settings for similar comfort.

I suppose we are also less tolerant of feeling cold as we age...
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Old 11-07-2013, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Ayrsley
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Usually between 68-70 on average. Actually, we tend to keep the thermostat at about 70 year round.

We will adjust the heat lower when we're not home, and we have a separate thermostat on each floor (3 floors), which helps keep costs down.
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Old 11-07-2013, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Boise, ID
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You people all like cold temperatures. My office and my house are both usually at 73. At that temperature, I'm usually wearing extra clothes. Last night, I curled up under a blanket to read for a while. We set it at 66-68 overnight while we are asleep, which is just right for us, but 73 during the day, year round.

Our house is only 1250 square feet though and built well, so our heating bills are still pretty reasonable. A super cold month (where it never gets above freezing the whole month) might top $200, but that is pretty rare.
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