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Old 12-14-2013, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Location: Location
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I grew up during WWII. At that time, production of consumer goods was on hold because all the factories were busy manufacturing for the military. The slogan at the time was, "Use it up; wear it out. Make it do or do without." It wasn't frugal - it was necessity.

I've pretty much lived my life that way. I'm still wearing some sweat pants I bought in 2004. They're great for sleeping in the winter. I haven't bought pajamas in years. And when you're buying clothes, always buy classic styles, regardless of price. Fads will date you.

I buy quite a few ALDI products. Yoghurt, cheese, chops, ground turkey, some produce.

And here's one example of Dollar store vs. department store - The department store has The Christmas Pickle, in a jar with a bit of shredded paper at the bottom, price $10.00
The Dollar store has the Christmas Pickle in a blister pack. price $1.00 I say finish up the grape jelly, wash out the jar, and Voila!! Saved $9.00. That's frugal.
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Old 12-14-2013, 11:49 AM
 
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[quote=jlawrence01;32609867]Have you ever seen some of those nursing homes that you go to when you cannot afford to choose? They are the type of homes where you are knocked off of your feet with the smell of urine upon entry to the building. You see the residents and they are totally unengaged with each other, parked in front if a television with a throng of other unkempt seniors. I have been to many of the "poor folk's homes" as I delivered for florists.[quote]

I have seen this exact scenario in the job I mentioned in my previous post. It is precisely as you desscribe. Not pretty.
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Old 12-14-2013, 11:53 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theatergypsy View Post
I've pretty much lived my life that way. I'm still wearing some sweat pants I bought in 2004. They're great for sleeping in the winter. I haven't bought pajamas in years.
This is too funny because I do the exact same thing. . I have a pair of sweatpants that I got as a teen back in 1984....and they were of such good quality that I still have them almost 30 years later. They are beat up but great for sleeping. My BF makes fun of me for having sweatpants (and a sweatshirt), both from the 80s, that I still wear for sleeping....but they are so comfortable .
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Old 12-14-2013, 01:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
It depends on how you define "the finer things in life". You might have roommates you really like and have wonderful relationships with. You might even cook inexpensive, but nutritious meals with them.

Psychologists who study happiness generally find that once you're a notch or two above poverty, happiness is much more dependent on stuff like relationships with others and one's spirituality than expensive watches & clothes, big houses, nice cars, etc. The happiness one gets from those things is quite fleeting. I am not knocking the "finer things" but the key to enjoying life's luxuries is that they must be easily affordable. If they're not, they are definitely not worth having. Sometimes luxury items aren't worth having even if you can afford them. I.E. The big house is more hassle to clean and maintain (even if you can afford to). The nice car feeling wears off in a year when the new model comes out and it may not be as reliable as the cheaper Honda or Toyota, etc.
I have learned that the "finer things in life" means things I can't afford.
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Old 12-14-2013, 03:56 PM
 
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Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
I have learned that the "finer things in life" means things I can't afford.
Heh, yeah I think that's what most people mean when they say that. And the evidence is overwhelming that buying goods/services you can't afford does not lead to happiness.
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Old 12-15-2013, 09:11 AM
MJ7 MJ7 started this thread
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
Heh, yeah I think that's what most people mean when they say that. And the evidence is overwhelming that buying goods/services you can't afford does not lead to happiness.
thats a terrible saying. it just means people do not understand what they like in life (hobbies)

example, i love sports cars, acoustic guitars, and producing music. these are all expensive hobbies, however, without them i wouldnt exist. they make me extremely happy. they take money to buy and sometimes i indulge where i could be cheap, but at the end of the day i know what i like
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Old 12-16-2013, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Location: Location
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
I have learned that the "finer things in life" means things I can't afford.
To me, the "finer things" don't have a price tag. Maybe that's because I never had what others consider to be the "finer things" and I never got spoiled.

I'm happy to have hot water when I want to shower. For a long time, I had to heat it on the stove.
I'm happy to have the ability to care for myself and not depend on others to do for me.
I'm thrilled to be able to get in my car and go to the store or the doctor or the theater.
I'm elated to have grandchildren who are growing up healthy and cared for.
I'm over the moon to not have to go somewhere when it snows.
I'm not all that excited about doing laundry, but I'm happy to have a washer/dryer and not have to do it by hand, as I did for more years than I care to remember.
I think the "finer things" are, for the most part, relative.
Me? I like a really good meat loaf. And chocolate eclair for dessert. That's pretty darn fine.
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Old 12-16-2013, 03:47 PM
 
Location: MO->MI->CA->TX->MA
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Again, I'll repeat: There's no clear-cut rule that Cheaper is better.. or Expensive is better.. there's a market for both cheap and expensive goods in many categories which is evidence of this fact. Everyone has different needs based on their values and circumstances.

The role that frugality plays here is to figure out what goods or services you can get by with paying less and getting a more inferior product.. and then allocating the money you've saved to enhance something else where you're not getting a satisfactory good or service.
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Old 12-17-2013, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
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Doesn't it all depend anyway? I mean, an egg is an egg and macaroni pasta is macaroni pasta, whether you get it from Whole Foods or Aldi. However, the frozen pizza's I got at Aldi were disgusting, to the point of being unedible. A tool is not a tool; if you have to use your tools frequently, then you will pay in the end if your cheap metal strips out and you have to buy again and hassle with a bigger issue.
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Old 12-17-2013, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Ayrsley
4,713 posts, read 9,655,325 times
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Originally Posted by Tallysmom View Post
How do you know this person went into debt?

The reason I ask is that a lot of people assume if someone uses a credit card that means the person can't afford it. A little over half the people that use credit cards pay them off monthly. I'm tired of the she charged it she MUST be in debt thinking.
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