Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-08-2019, 08:07 PM
 
13,811 posts, read 27,433,048 times
Reputation: 14250

Advertisements

If my income were so high it made me carefree about paying someone to change out my lightbulbs I would instead save that money and use it to fix my bad knees. Just me though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-08-2019, 08:17 PM
 
1,914 posts, read 2,241,772 times
Reputation: 14573
Quote:
Originally Posted by wheelsup View Post
If my income were so high it made me carefree about paying someone to change out my lightbulbs I would instead save that money and use it to fix my bad knees. Just me though.
Thanks for sharing, sweetie. You know nothing about me, my medical condition, or any comorbidities that might affect the kind of treatment I can safely tolerate. But somehow you feel qualified to judge my choices and ridicule me. Yeah, you're a lot better than I am.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-08-2019, 08:18 PM
 
2,333 posts, read 1,960,879 times
Reputation: 1321
Some of you are not dealing with honest businesses. Not all of the higher prices quoted in this thread are dishonest, but some of them are not quite right.
The Car Dealership Quotes for low tire pressure, and the $600+ for the minor AC Service, and hot water heater are highway robbery.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-08-2019, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,448 posts, read 7,580,581 times
Reputation: 16456
Quote:
Originally Posted by blktoptrvl View Post
I have a feeling that the cost of many services and merchandise in America would be much lower if people here were a little more DIY minded. But it seems that most don't want to be bothered - until they see the bill.

As an example, I was in the car dealership waiting for a part when I overheard a customer complaining about a $500 service charge for having a bulb changed. "I didn't expect it would cost this much!"

The more people are willing to have services "done" for them, the more service providers will increase prices. IMO, the cure for many price increases is to force service people to complete with "almost free" labor.

What is the last project or task around your house that you normally would have called a service company for, or an item that you could have purchased for a high price - that you actually ended up doing or making yourself?


How DIY are you?
Some newer vehicles require the entire front end to be disassembled in order to reach the bulb. My neighbor has one. That's why it can get rather expensive.

As for me, I do as much work around the house and on my vehicles as possible. I do all my own oil and filter changes on my vehicles and equipment, such as generators, lawn mower and snow blower. I winterize and dewinterize my travel trailer, and I take care of things like plugged toilets, changing out faucets, replacing burned out bulbs, replacing furnace filters and any other things that need to be done. I'm retired, so I have plenty of time and I grew up in era when men were expected to be able to take care of their homes and vehicles and learned to do so from their fathers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-08-2019, 11:11 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,448 posts, read 7,580,581 times
Reputation: 16456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
OTOH, I had a Volvo XC90 that needed one of the two center brake light bulbs replaced. One worked fine and I wasn't concerned about the functionality of this entirely secondary indicator. Every time it was serviced, the writer tried to push me to have it replaced... for something like $67 or $107 or such. I had it on the list to do myself when... well, the car went to the ex.

A year later a service writer terrorized her into replacing it and I was b*tched at about it, halfway across the country. I told her, "[Our son] could have replaced it in five minutes with a $3 bulb."

So it goes both ways - some small jobs really are costly in time, but things like this, and the typical $60-75 charge for replacing the cabin air filter (which took me fifteen minutes on my Odyssey only because I didn't have a flat screwdriver at hand to pop the retainers easily) are simply gouging. Often high-pressure gouging. A kindly grandmother could replace either one.
Your ex is the one who should have been b****ing, not you. You let that bulb go for how long before the car went to the ex? And then you didn't tell her about it or have your son replace it? When my Jeep's message center alerted me to a burned out bulb I went right over to Napa and got a replacement and installed when I got home.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2019, 12:01 AM
 
Location: Tulsa
2,230 posts, read 1,713,838 times
Reputation: 2434
Ever considered retiring abroad? like some COL places such as Thailand?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2019, 01:01 AM
 
Location: Henderson, NV
7,087 posts, read 8,629,910 times
Reputation: 9978
I am not handy, so any home related thing I have someone else do outside of light bulbs, AC filter changes, and the absolute basics. I'm handy with technology, though, so I rarely need any help related to that.

You have to be really careful with contractors, though, because some will absolutely rip you off big time. I had a time pressure to get this dry wall repaired in my house (mostly a hole from a fish tank pipe / hookup) before we listed the home, and I didn't have the chance to get bids or anything like that, I just trusted my agent. The guy shows up 4 hours late, but he doesn't even do the work, he has a younger assistant do the work and then heads out after collecting my check. $700 for 3 hours of this guy doing basic drywall repair, and he used MY paint that I already had handy. That is the definition of highway robbery. I told my agent because we have a few minor corrections now that the house is sold that I won't use him again and costs need to be clearly state as a per hour rate plus material costs and not one penny above that. If it's $75/hour, fine, but the drywall repair should have cost maybe $300 not $700. I had a much larger drywall repair project done in my last condo and the guy charged me $400 and brought everything himself and showed up on time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2019, 01:24 AM
 
Location: Dayton OH
5,760 posts, read 11,358,171 times
Reputation: 13539
My Dad was a 110% DIY person. I can never recall him calling somebody to fix something in the house or on one of our very old used cars. When he went used car shopping, he would look for two used cars of the same type. At any one time, only one of the two cars was usually in running order. If he needed to fix something on the good car, he would take what was needed off the "spare parts" car. Then, he would go to the junk yard and eventually find the same item for the "spare parts" car. Eventually the "spare parts" car would get into running order and it would become the good car, at least for awhile. Needless to say, I picked up some of his DIY capability.

With DIY, you need to know your limits. These days, many things are not as easy to fix as older technology that was all mechanical and all analog. Some DIY jobs require expensive, special tools. If it is for a one-time fix, that special tool might cost much more than getting the job done by someone else. Sometimes, you can rent a special tool, if it is not too exotic.

Some DIY jobs are literally not worth risking your life to do by yourself. A major tree trimming or tree removal job is a good example. Significant rooftop work on a house that has a pitched roof is another one. One little mistake and you are dead or severely injured for life.

I like to DIY for basic car maintenance, 100 percent of my bicycle maintenance, and a variety of other household tasks. I am retired so I've got plenty of spare time. Sometimes I need to do a little research, but that is good brain exercise. DIY brings out your creative and problem solving skills. It is also satisfying to fix something - it boosts self confidence. Yes, it saves money, but I like DIY for these other reasons too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2019, 01:26 AM
 
6,768 posts, read 5,481,691 times
Reputation: 17641
I am neither mechanically inclined nor an engineer.

My father graduated college with a general engineering degree, and was mechanically inclined. A product of the depression and war, he had a knack for fixing things. While i used to "help " him, i never knew just exactly what he was doing, even with explaining to me, and i certainly retained anything like a sieve.

My FIL was an ELECTRICAL engineer, BUT thpught he could engineer or fix anything, also a product of the depression and war. Some of the cob jobs he "manufactured " , well lets say i think could have done a better job not knowing anything. More often than not he had to call a professional to fix the damage he did THEN fix the actual problem.

I dont know a resistor from a capacitor so electronics are out, and i never could understand a schematic.

My OH is like me, so most of the time we dont know anything about anything. So we have to hire most things done.

Coupled with my bad back,hips and knees, the fact i get around with a cane, cant get up off the floor or ground without help, and cant climb a ladder anymore, i have no choice but to hire things done.

Some of us just cant DIY.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2019, 01:39 AM
 
Location: Dayton OH
5,760 posts, read 11,358,171 times
Reputation: 13539
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodHombre View Post
Ever considered retiring abroad? like some COL places such as Thailand?
I am spending most of the summer season in Germany. Here in the cities, most people live in multi-story apartment type dwellings, and don't have a workshop or a good place to work on cars or household stuff (like in the garage). As a result, people who fix household stuff are in demand, and their job title is "Hausmeister". Yes, you understand some German, it means House Master. And yes, they fix almost anything that needs repair in the home.

Many immigrants from Southern or Eastern Europe bring a wealth of mechanical, electrical and plumbing skills, and have found success as Hausmeisters. They make a good living and usually charge reasonable prices for their labor. The expensive thing can be the cost of materials or items to repair, often much higher than in North America. There are some big box home stores, but prices are pretty high, maybe because there are fewer DIY shoppers?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top