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Old 06-10-2019, 09:47 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
32,632 posts, read 47,975,309 times
Reputation: 78367

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Quote:
Originally Posted by aileesic View Post
A whole lot of people live in rental properties. ...... Landlords do not want DIYers ..........

That's true that renting cuts back the options of saving money by DIY. Tenants are paying someone else to do it, although that is the very reason that many tenants like to rent. It is so they don't have to fix anything.


Working on the house and working on the car aren't generally allowed in a rental. But there are other DIY options for tenants. Places to save money by DIY.


Tenants can do their own pedicures. Tenants can groom their own dog. Tenants can cook their own meals instead of paying a restaurant to cook for them. They can do their own furniture and decorating shopping and design instead of paying the fancy store to do it for them.


They can sew buttons on instead of paying to have it done. They can do their own laundry and ironing instead of sending it out. They can sit down with their kids to do homework instead of paying a tutor to teach the kids.


They can go camping for vacations instead of paying a full service fancy resort.


They can go to the do it yourself car wash and vacuum instead of paying quite a bit more to have it done professionally. (possibly can't wash the car in the driveway of the rental.)


They can keep the rental unit clean on an ongoing basis instead of giving up their deposit to have the landlord clean when they move out.
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Old 06-10-2019, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
1,110 posts, read 1,378,055 times
Reputation: 901
I'm kinda tight with my budget so I DIY as much as possible. But if you have the money, just buy new or ask for professional service and help your local economy.
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Old 06-10-2019, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,448 posts, read 7,580,581 times
Reputation: 16456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tn_eddy View Post
Why would anyone DIY a landlord's property ? Call them, let them do it. Heck, back when I had rental units, that was the exact OPPOSITE of the problem. Tenants would let a sink trap leak to the point of rotting out the bottom of the cabinet and not bother to mention "Hey....it's wet under there"...and that's NOT something you see in a casual occasional inspection folks.


I NEVER had a tenant that seemed to give a flip about my properties....and these were NICE, fairly new single family houses, not low end HUD stuff. One of the reasons I sold them off was 'tenant mentality' where they have no respect for my property.
Depends on the landlord. The last time I was between houses I had to rent for two months. I noticed that the kitchen sink faucet had to be wiggled around to get it to shut off. Landlord's solution was to wiggle it to get it to turn off. Which could take a while. The master bath toilet wouldn't flush unless you kept the handle pushed down for the entire flush cycle. Landlord's solution was to keep the handle pushed down until the flush cycle was complete. Nice way to wake up out of a deep sleep at 3 am. When the shower doors fell out of the roller retaining clips due to improper installation, I just fixed it on my own, because the landlord's solution would have been to push really hard to open and close the doors.

So that works both ways. Now that we have two houses, I don't ever foresee myself ever renting again.
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Old 06-11-2019, 06:37 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
32,919 posts, read 36,316,341 times
Reputation: 43748
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
Depends on the landlord. The last time I was between houses I had to rent for two months. I noticed that the kitchen sink faucet had to be wiggled around to get it to shut off. Landlord's solution was to wiggle it to get it to turn off. Which could take a while. The master bath toilet wouldn't flush unless you kept the handle pushed down for the entire flush cycle. Landlord's solution was to keep the handle pushed down until the flush cycle was complete. Nice way to wake up out of a deep sleep at 3 am. When the shower doors fell out of the roller retaining clips due to improper installation, I just fixed it on my own, because the landlord's solution would have been to push really hard to open and close the doors.

So that works both ways. Now that we have two houses, I don't ever foresee myself ever renting again.
That's my son's landlord!
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Old 06-11-2019, 07:51 AM
 
2,605 posts, read 2,708,972 times
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As a person who has done party related DIY (totally unnecessary and takes way too much time & could have kept it simple), I don't think it is efficient for everyone to DIY. The money you waste on buying supplies to DIY that 1 item and than the materials sit around wasted. But I like micro economy where friends and neighbors all are good DIY-er at one thing or another. Have our small little community where everyone isn't doing their individual DIY but collectively its getting done without going to big corporation.
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Old 06-11-2019, 08:02 AM
 
18,547 posts, read 15,572,959 times
Reputation: 16225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
So there's no gradient between doing simple routine maintenance that costs you thousands a year, and doing major service or remodeling work? Your income-time is so precious that ten minutes to replace a bulb or fix a light switch is best done by someone else for an hour to several hours of your income?
Take it from someone who outsources just about everything, actually it is a lot more time than you think for someone who does not normally DIY. For someone who is accustomed to outsourcing these tasks, the time it takes must include the time it takes to figure out where to buy the necessary tools, then to go buy them, the time it takes to do them, and then the time it takes to clean up. Perhaps even these are rather trivial in the case of changing a light bulb, but more complex DIY tasks can quickly become daunting to someone who is not set up to do them or is not accustomed to doing them.

In my case, I move rather frequently and almost never have any real garage space or tools, so for me to do even an oil change myself would be 5-10X the total time investment compared to someone who does it regularly, after accounting for all the indirectly related tasks.
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Old 06-11-2019, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Floribama
18,949 posts, read 43,571,506 times
Reputation: 18753
I have learned a lot of watching the pros do their work. I recently had the galvanized plumbing in a rental I’m remodeling replaced with PEX, and I never realized how relatively simple that stuff is to work with. My plumber is getting ready to retire soon, and he told me “man, if you’ll just go invest in your own tools from Home Depot you can save a ton of money by not having to pay a plumber. He showed me exactly how to use the tools, so now when I need to replace a valve or run a new line, I can do it right then without having to wait days for a plumber.

He also showed me how to use those expanding rubber balloons to clear clogs. Somehow I had never even seen those before. You can buy them for $15 rather than calling someone to clear the clog.

https://www.amazon.com/Cleaning-Blad...JCT3EDX1W25V0G
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Old 06-11-2019, 03:25 PM
 
4,991 posts, read 5,282,508 times
Reputation: 15763
I grew up in a DIY household. As one of my brothers pointed out a few years back, everything is a project. You don't enjoy it because you're always fixing stuff.

Fortunately, we have an income that allows us to hire some things out. We save money in other areas like not going out for entertainment every week. I like to eat out, but I don't like wine or beer so I rarely drink. I keep a vehicle for as close to ten years as I can. I used to change my own oil, but city living makes it harder when you don't have a place to store excess equipment. I paint the one story rooms and doors. Anything over that gets a professional. I can take apart some drains, but hire out for other things. I plant flowers, but someone else does the mowing and edging.

I've rented, but that's because I knew where I was living was only a short term situation. It had nothing to do with diy. Owning a home costs money too. I'm not convinced it saves money particularly in the short term. Owning a home has value elsewhere.
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Old 06-11-2019, 11:00 PM
 
Location: Gulf Coast
1,458 posts, read 1,168,878 times
Reputation: 3098
Some people are just born mechanically inclined. I am blessed to have a husband like that. As a kid he liked to take things apart and put them back together. He fixed the family boat motor and he was a teenager.


I'm the tool girl and flashlight person as he does the work most times. He has fixed multiple things on our 11-yr-old car. Like rebuilding the gears on the automatic window switches.. pumps, brakes, ac things, tires, etc. He has replaced the inner tubes in our bikes.



Together we took out uneven floor tiles and replaced. He just put a new element in our flat top stove. We've replaced or fixed ice makers in refrigerator/freezers; changed light fixtures. We do our own lawn care. However, I understand why some people don't do these things. One is having enough $ that it isn't an issue. Or not having the correct tools, or the right physical ability. That is our problem now, things are getting harder and harder to do. We're cautious with ladders. We recently hired out the trimming of our trees.


I know a single working woman who fixes everything she can by watching videos just to help her budget. I know we've saved a ton of money over the years being able to do this and I feel very blessed.
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Old 06-12-2019, 08:43 AM
 
Location: SC
8,793 posts, read 8,157,503 times
Reputation: 12992
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Answers View Post
Some people are just born mechanically inclined. I am blessed to have a husband like that. As a kid he liked to take things apart and put them back together. He fixed the family boat motor and he was a teenager.


I'm the tool girl and flashlight person as he does the work most times. He has fixed multiple things on our 11-yr-old car. Like rebuilding the gears on the automatic window switches.. pumps, brakes, ac things, tires, etc. He has replaced the inner tubes in our bikes.



Together we took out uneven floor tiles and replaced. He just put a new element in our flat top stove. We've replaced or fixed ice makers in refrigerator/freezers; changed light fixtures. We do our own lawn care. However, I understand why some people don't do these things. One is having enough $ that it isn't an issue. Or not having the correct tools, or the right physical ability. That is our problem now, things are getting harder and harder to do. We're cautious with ladders. We recently hired out the trimming of our trees.


I know a single working woman who fixes everything she can by watching videos just to help her budget. I know we've saved a ton of money over the years being able to do this and I feel very blessed.
I think you hit on one of the most important aspects of DIY here. Having the tools. Even if you might save money doing a certain job itself, sometimes getting the needed tools is too expensive a proposition.

If you have been a DIY person for most of your life, it is more likely that you will already have most of the tools you need, and if there some unique tool you don't already have, it is also likely you won't mind spending for one more.
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