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Old 12-27-2023, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Boston
20,153 posts, read 9,043,504 times
Reputation: 18815

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why wash plastic bags? You can buy them on Amazon by the thousand and they're pretty cheap. $25-30.
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Old 12-27-2023, 01:40 PM
 
24,612 posts, read 10,936,326 times
Reputation: 47011
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
I really appreciate all of the municipalities and their efforts to ban plastic bags which represent about 0.05% of the plastics in the average grocery store.

Now that they have accomplished that, why not try something a lot more significant including:

1) the replacement of all plastic beverage containers with recyclable aluminum and aseptic containers or even better, RETURNABLE milk, soda and beer containers that we used to have.
2) The elimination of plastic packaging for all produce. Why does all produce need to be packaged in clam shells? It never used to be?
3) the elimination of heavy plastic containers for liquid detergent and perhaps, a return to powdered detergent that can be conveniently shipped in recyclable cardboard boxes.


For years, you could buy Ocean Spray juice beverage concentrates in aluminum cans or aseptic containers eliminating those heavy plastic bottles. Not any more since THOSE containers are not sold and only used in products sent to food banks.
Please work up the overhead for:
1) Production, transport, sterilization of reuseable containers.
3)Reconfiguration of production, packaging, containers, shipping anf washmashines to go from liquid to powder; especially HE mashines.
2) Is it necessary to refer to produce packaging as "dam"? Please make a workable suggestion on how to ship, store, sell small lettuces?

It never used to be - things change!
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Old 12-27-2023, 01:44 PM
 
24,612 posts, read 10,936,326 times
Reputation: 47011
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
Please. Trying to turn washing reusable shopping bags into an environmental sin is ridiculous. Realistically, how frequently does any non-germaphobe need to wash shopping bags? Not very. Don't you launder other household items and why on earth wouldn't you simply add a cloth shopping bag to those other items when the time comes? A bag or two would require a miniscule additional amount of your precious water or polluting soap. Surely you can dream up better environmental straw dogs than those!

FWIW, I've been using the same set of unbleached canvas shopping bags for decades. Someone gave me a conveniently-sized plastic coated cloth bag for some reason years ago and I've been using it for potentially leaky things like fresh produce/meat ever since. It wipes clean in a blink. If some grocery item does have the audacity to leak on the way home, I wipe or rinse the bag or add it to a load of sheets, towels or whatever. I've probably needed to wash any of them less than 5 times over all those decades. They aren't filthy, don't smell, don't contaminate food, don't harbor roaches or anything else. They have successfully hauled hundreds if not thousands of items from store to kitchen. After being unloaded, they are parked by the door where I hang my keys or get tossed back in the car ready for the next shopping trip. I'm not sure I could count the number of single use plastic store bags I have NOT NEEDED to pay tax on, recycle, return, or (shudder) toss over all those decades.
https://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/3338...N3&csp=f&pos=1
Some of mine haf 30 years and a couple of grocery and flight miles on them. They do fine in the washer.
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Old 12-27-2023, 04:47 PM
 
Location: on the wind
23,332 posts, read 18,903,694 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skeddy View Post
why wash plastic bags? You can buy them on Amazon by the thousand and they're pretty cheap. $25-30.
Someone really missed the whole point of re-use!
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Old 02-25-2024, 02:56 PM
 
Location: northern Alabama
1,094 posts, read 1,278,803 times
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Our' local Publix store and Fresh Market sell beautiful seasonal bags. I have a set for each holiday. The cloth handles are easier for me to hold. They are plastic and washable.
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Old 03-17-2024, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Elysium
12,392 posts, read 8,168,105 times
Reputation: 9199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
Someone really missed the whole point of re-use!
Then again the OP specifically references avoiding the government imposed, fee, tax and/or regulation that made it illegal for me to give a bag to my customer. So that is a political argument with a libertarian bent of fighting against the majority forcing its will on them.

On the other hand on the Green forum there was a thread complaining that the throw away bags got thicker. Since retailers were faced with customers thinking they were cheated when charged the state imposed price for a bag. So as a good retailer the bags, at whatever rate they are reused became more robust than the ones which were given away.

Then there is convenience, and what is ignored more often in this Frugal Living forum, the time cost. It is cheaper to just roll off the next bag that Amazon delivered to than to buy the bag at the point of purchase. And throwing it away when you are done with the bag saves you time. Because for the pennies you have wasted you have gained seconds to do something that you want to do as most don't want to clean. Cleaning is work, something costing us fun time, it is the reason most of us are paid to work.
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Old 03-18-2024, 08:47 AM
 
24,612 posts, read 10,936,326 times
Reputation: 47011
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taiko View Post
Then again the OP specifically references avoiding the government imposed, fee, tax and/or regulation that made it illegal for me to give a bag to my customer. So that is a political argument with a libertarian bent of fighting against the majority forcing its will on them.

On the other hand on the Green forum there was a thread complaining that the throw away bags got thicker. Since retailers were faced with customers thinking they were cheated when charged the state imposed price for a bag. So as a good retailer the bags, at whatever rate they are reused became more robust than the ones which were given away.

Then there is convenience, and what is ignored more often in this Frugal Living forum, the time cost. It is cheaper to just roll off the next bag that Amazon delivered to than to buy the bag at the point of purchase. And throwing it away when you are done with the bag saves you time. Because for the pennies you have wasted you have gained seconds to do something that you want to do as most don't want to clean. Cleaning is work, something costing us fun time, it is the reason most of us are paid to work.
The bags at Sprouts are imprinted with x-number of uses per bag.
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Old Yesterday, 02:10 PM
 
1,922 posts, read 1,283,896 times
Reputation: 1976
I don't have plastic bag tax where I live. Do you buy trash bags? If so, you should consider doing what I do by using the plastic grocery bags as trash bags. It may come out cheaper than actual trash bags.
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Old Today, 02:34 PM
 
23,607 posts, read 70,467,118 times
Reputation: 49297
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
Someone really missed the whole point of re-use!
Sometimes re-use is simply not a good idea. If you happen to be in the middle of a drought where water use is restricted, wasting water washing a bag is not financially, ecologically, socially, or time-management sound.
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