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Old 03-06-2024, 03:51 AM
 
239 posts, read 108,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threerun View Post
It's the other staples that cost us the most. TP, paper products, hygiene products, sugar, flour, corn starch, soy sauce etc.. You get the picture. Proteins and vegetables we have all that pretty much covered.

For just two of us we pretty much grow or harvest 75% of our food. Bread and butter, rice and grains- things like that we need to buy.
That was AMAZING, thank you for sharing those pictures. I admire you
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Old 03-06-2024, 06:02 AM
 
3,933 posts, read 2,201,338 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Threerun View Post
It's the other staples that cost us the most. TP, paper products, hygiene products, sugar, flour, corn starch, soy sauce etc.. You get the picture. Proteins and vegetables we have all that pretty much covered.

















For just two of us we pretty much grow or harvest 75% of our food. Bread and butter, rice and grains- things like that we need to buy.
You eat Canada goose?
How do you cook them?

What about chronic wasting disease of the deer? Do you have it in your area? It is spreading..
(It is similar to mad cow disease)
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Old 03-06-2024, 10:01 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
34,754 posts, read 58,116,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
I suppose it must be possible to save money by eating at potlucks if you are one of those persons who take a little bit of cheap crap food and stuff yourself on whatever the others bring. My own experience is that when I go to a potluck I want to take something that everyone will really enjoy and that will all be eten up. Everyone else seems to have the same feeling about it because in the groups I potluck with, the food is outstanding and nobody is saving any money. They are putting forth their best efforts.

I will concede, however that it would be less expensive than everyone getting together at an expensive restaurant to have a get together and visit.
Our potlucks are superb, prepared by farmers, ranchers, gardeners, 100% home cooking, usually 100% local grown and sourced.

Not cheap, but not expensive either. Most of my dishes have ~$5 of ingredients, often from my freezer. But we have plenty to eat and a variety to share and drag home. Easily 4 meals / servings for ~$5.

Not as cheap as my $0.25 oatmeal breakfast, but well within $100/ month food outlay.

We've served 3 neighbor guest families this week alone. It's no big deal. It's all from the freezer, and there is plenty left. For our volunteer community prepared homeless meal this months we served Salmon and Asparagus and fresh salads. ~ 70 meals. (Prepared and furnished by a group of neighbors).

Today, Safeway has $0.50/lb apples and oranges, so fresh fruit salad this week.

We're very lucky in the USA to source inexpensive food (so far).

Gleaner season is coming, where we volunteer to prepare dried meals and ingredients, shipped to the needy, worldwide. Okanagan Gleaners.
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Old 03-06-2024, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Was Midvalley Oregon; Now Eastside Seattle area
13,080 posts, read 7,533,882 times
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Some food items, are cheaper buying frozen than, regardless of season, at retailer Trader Joes, than to GYO (1st profession in agriculture-food processing).

Some food items, are cheaper to get at ethnic stores:
For salami, cured meats, smoked fish we found a European grocer;
For olives and some dried fruits (raisins, apricots) a Turkiye Store (-stan countries) & TJ;
Bananas @ TJ;
Pork at Chinese stores;
Cabbage (Napa and head cabbage), radish, certain tofus @H-Mart;
Sable, branzino, trout, tilapia @ Costco;
Avocados and others misc. fruits at FredMeyer (Kroger) on their discount table (I will not buy avocados hard because I have no confidence if they will become overly bruised by stupid people pinching the product, or if the product is picked too green and will never develop properly to ripeness.
Stone fruit (peaches, apricots) at farmers' market. I will pay highly for near soft ripe and sweet-ripe fruit. (We had a peach farm)
Cherries dark (generally the cheapest) and typically found at FredMeyer-QFC (a large PNW founded grocery-kroger). Prefer Light cherries but I find crunchy Rainier Cherries, odd.

We discovered, the access to high quality food, cheaper in the urban Seattle area than in the central Willamette Valley.

Last edited by leastprime; 03-06-2024 at 11:54 AM..
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Old 03-06-2024, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
19,811 posts, read 22,703,567 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L00k4ward View Post
You eat Canada goose?
How do you cook them?

What about chronic wasting disease of the deer? Do you have it in your area? It is spreading..
(It is similar to mad cow disease)
Geese? Chile Colorado, stewed / cooked with Indian Curries, ground 50/50 with bacon for goose sliders, cured and smoked pastrami, goose jerky...

Yes chronic wasting disease is an issue. #1 remove the lymph glands and have them tested (free in MT). #2 debone the animal. Do not cut thru any bone. #3 Freeze the meat until test results returned.
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Old 03-06-2024, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
19,811 posts, read 22,703,567 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TruckeeTami View Post
That was AMAZING, thank you for sharing those pictures. I admire you
Thank-you!
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Old 03-12-2024, 01:50 PM
 
1,256 posts, read 1,383,340 times
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It was a bonanza at my Giant grocery store today in the meat department but I showed restraint. Lots of packages of Manager's Specials and it was noon -- way past the usual time they put those out. They did have flat cut corned beef roasts for $1.99 lb so purchased a very nice one for $6.45. I will cook it in the oven and use it for sandwiches. Also bought a Manager's Special's package of 6 thin cut bone in pork chops for $4 -- and used a digital coupon for $1 off any meat purchase so all in all a bargain day. Lots of meals for $10 worth of meat.
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Old 03-12-2024, 02:06 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
11,087 posts, read 17,557,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TamaraSavannah View Post
Okay, lessons from the campout cook....who is supplying all the food for around a max of 40 people for a weekend.

2 briskets. These days, that's not cheap as it was but shop and buy early when the prices are best, put it in a freezer, and cook up before the trip the week of.

The rest is essentially....Wally World is your friend!

Bread: shop their day old bread, perhaps a few stores, a day or two ahead.
Cheese: buy block cheese, have cutting boards, slicers, knives on site. You can go for sliced cheese packets, but that will massively drive up the cost. Here, Parmesan is considered a spice and would be with that option.
Condiments: Buy and store for the weekend. The usual such as ketchup, mustard, mayo and lots of BBQ sauce, a few bottles of Tabasco. Butter, honey, syrup
Eggs: at least 2 cartons of 18 each
Jugs of milk and OJ, 1 or 2, in the food coolers

Flour, Sugar, Bisquik. This stuff is sent out with old coffee cans for protection.
Instant Cocoa and Coffee
Tea (bags) and Ground Coffee. I do carry a box of coffee filters and the perk pot inwards just in case they aren't for Cowboy Coffee.
Sweeteners and Creamer
Baking powder & soda, instant milk

A bag of spaghetti, perhaps a box of noodles or a carton of ramen, a jar or two of spaghetti sauce or canned tomato sauce for the non meat eaters.

Graham crackers and Nestle bars for smores

In the past, I loaded up with cheap sodas but they aren't drinking that as much now, so lite on the sodas. more on the bottled water with the truck being loaded up with water coolers, too!

Spices: I send out a box with every kind of spice I can find in my kitchen, even chicken base. The idea is that if someone wants to cook up something for themselves, they can find something in the field kitchen. Carry at least a bottle of olive oil if someone wants to season their pan.

Buy most of your spices at Dollar Stores and Big Lots.

Of course, there are the associated materials such as tin foil, paper goods, soaps, bins, etc..

I tend to bake 3 pan cookies before these affairs, different flavors, which I cut up into cookie squares and baggy. Quick energy before the main course, stuff to go with coffee, etc..

Some basic considerations. Especially with the cold stuff, that first paragraph after the brisket, anything opened is TOAST! At the end of the campout, I am giving away food to the participants for three main reasons. First of all, it would be difficult for me to store it.

Secondly, most of my campers are "starving college students" and I know for them, money is tight, and they should get the spoils...........and it pleases me to be Godlike.

Finally, this is part of selling the industry I am in.

Opened dry goods vary. They can take it if they wish, but I often come home with a lot of it. They go back into my camping and emergency supplies.

So two big lessons here for how to eat cheaply. First of all, think of the basics and what can be made from there. You don't need Bisquik to make pancakes but it is cheap enough to have some. Further, for those who don't cook, the recipes are right on the box.

And secondly? Get involved in activities where there is someone like me who is the cook!

A little hint on the coffee. Instead of packing the coffee and filters, you can buy coffee bags that are just like tea bags, but with coffee. My wife found out about them several years ago when we were still camping and took them every time we went. Each person can make their coffee just as strong or weak as they want it. These are also good to keep in the house if the power goes off in your house and you cook with gas. Just boil some water and drop a coffee bag in. Around here, Folgers sells most of these.
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Old 03-19-2024, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Annandale, VA
7,004 posts, read 2,717,328 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrannyBear View Post
It was a bonanza at my Giant grocery store today in the meat department but I showed restraint. Lots of packages of Manager's Specials and it was noon -- way past the usual time they put those out. They did have flat cut corned beef roasts for $1.99 lb so purchased a very nice one for $6.45. I will cook it in the oven and use it for sandwiches. Also bought a Manager's Special's package of 6 thin cut bone in pork chops for $4 -- and used a digital coupon for $1 off any meat purchase so all in all a bargain day. Lots of meals for $10 worth of meat.
I'm an early riser so I will go the grocery store around 7am. My first stop is to the meat department to load up on all the "manager special" meats. I take what I can and put in freezer bags at home to thaw as needed.

I am a single man so I will cook once a week for lunch and dinner and reheat leftovers for the next 4-5 days. Breakfast is always prepared fresh each day. Not having to think about what I have to eat daily allows me to save because I am not tempted to hit a fast food joint.
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Old 03-19-2024, 08:51 PM
 
16,395 posts, read 30,304,377 times
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Kroger's in several markets have pork butt for $0.99/lb.
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