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Old 09-09-2023, 04:57 PM
 
2,048 posts, read 990,078 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JOinGA View Post
I am purging by giving away a steady stream of items on a FB Buy Nothing site. The relief at seeing things go out the door to people who can use them is tremendous. I am looking forward to moving with a lot less stuff.
Enjoy the purge! It's a liberating feeling not being burdened with so much stuff. I do a purge 1-2 times a year, and if I don't truly love something, out it goes...usually back to the thrift store where I found it in the first place. Donating unused items is an easy way to be charitable and I never bother trying to sell things for money (with the exception of vehicles), better to pass them on to someone in need.

 
Old 09-09-2023, 05:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wile E. Coyote View Post
I do not think you can have too many bathrooms.
Are you sure? Sometimes I read the real estate ads of these absurdly huge mansions (actual mansions, not McMansions) that have, say, 7 bedrooms and 15 bathrooms. WTF? Why does one dwelling need so many bathrooms? For guests and parties? Ridiculous.

I must confess I'm guilty of wanting my own bathroom, especially in situations sharing with the opposite sex. I grew up in a large house with four bathrooms so cannot relate to hearing about families sharing one bathroom. There must have been fights, especially with teens! The lack of privacy and always feeling like I have to hurry up would not work well for me.
 
Old 09-09-2023, 05:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vicky3vicky View Post
We had less "crap" and today I think most people now tend to have too much of it. As a matter of fact, almost 20 times as many people living in larger homes are renting storage units to store more stuff. Why? i don't understand.
I don't get it either. There's a bedroom community in my area that in the past two years has EXPLODED with storage units. Acres and acres of storage buildings. Such an eyesore! There's even a site currently under construction where one can purchase a storage unit in a complex for something like $150,000, "a place to keep all your toys" as it's advertised. Sounds like a bad investment to me.
 
Old 09-09-2023, 05:15 PM
 
Location: PNW
7,492 posts, read 3,219,325 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heavymind View Post
Are you sure? Sometimes I read the real estate ads of these absurdly huge mansions (actual mansions, not McMansions) that have, say, 7 bedrooms and 15 bathrooms. WTF? Why does one dwelling need so many bathrooms? For guests and parties? Ridiculous.

I must confess I'm guilty of wanting my own bathroom, especially in situations sharing with the opposite sex. I grew up in a large house with four bathrooms so cannot relate to hearing about families sharing one bathroom. There must have been fights, especially with teens! The lack of privacy and always feeling like I have to hurry up would not work well for me.

There is no danger of me getting too many bathrooms in my price range so I stand by my original statement
 
Old 09-09-2023, 05:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heavymind View Post
That sounds huge to me.
People are going to have different opinions of what is large or small based on their experiences. We sold our 4,000 SF house after the last child went to college and moved into a 3,200 SF townhouse. Then last year we sold the townhouse and bought an 1,800 SF condo.

1,800 SF is small in comparison to what we used to have, but for other people it may be big. And just like SF, whether or not one considers their living arrangement “frugal” will be based on what other homes have cost them and the level of their income.
 
Old 09-09-2023, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
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A note or two on the house and ranch. The ranch needed to be a minimal of 10 acres because under Texas Law, one must have at least 5 acres to pump groundwater (well) without a permit and at least 10 to be able to shoot on their own land. The house is 2100 sq feet for I figured that was the max that one woman could take care of alone and it is designed as a Tier IIA safe house (private residence convertible to such). Not saying if others are right or wrong, just giving the concepts I am coming from.

A thing I do wonder about is when people say they got rid of all of this stuff, just what kind of stuff are they getting rid of? Grand Aunt's china and crystal ware? Okay, I can understand that, I went through that myself. Books? Well, sigh, modern Kindle world. Things from childhood? Okay even if it seems people are losing imagination. Etc, etc, etc..

BUT, as I go through life in the past score or so, so often it is finding out that what I had really wasn't up to the task and I need to get something better that fits the limitations that I have. Ie, I am not a chainsaw person, have nightmares of going the Tin Woodman route in not such a nice way, so I need in the wood cutting inventory an axe, axe handles, and a machete......to go with the hatchet, bow saws, other saws that are decades old.

I wonder what people are so loaded up with that they can't find a use for or, probably more the case, where they live so they have no need of such a use.
Quote:
Originally Posted by vicky3vicky View Post
4 of us in a 3/2, somehow 2 living room 1100 square feet. And it feels fine. There were 14 of us here last weekend with plenty ofroom for more and it didn't feel cramped. [of course we spent alot of time on the back patio and the kids were outside much of the time. It felt cozy, in the nicest sense of the word]

We do have a garage with an attic so Christmas, other seasonal items, Avon inventory, hundreds of books and many other things are stored there until needed.

We did just move here 2 weeks ago and are planning and hoping for quite a few visits from our loved ones. When they come we will make space. My oldest son, though, has told us that if too many come at once they can stay in his 7 bedroom home.

I know when I was growing up, we, like most people, lived in an 800 to 900 square foot house. There were 3 bedrooms, one for the parents, 1 for the boys and 1 for the girls. And 1 bathroom. Hair and makeup done in bedrooms and there were puke pans and bedpans my mom brought from the hospital for when more than 1 person was sick. I never felt crowded except when my brother was popping his zits or doing God knows what in the bathroom and taking up more than his share of time.

I know in the U.K most homes are still this small. "I'm not sure what happened to us as a people that a couple generations later we "need" so much room. Or why we would want it [the second bathroom I can understand.] We stillhave room to play games at the table, watch tv in the living/family room or read a book or practice the harmonica in our bedrooms. If our room mates were being loud and annoying we learned to tune them out from a young age.
Piano and saxophone were relegated to the garage. And, without realizing it at the time, we were kinder to the environment.

We had less "crap" and today I think most people now tend to have too much of it. As a matter of fact, almost 20 times as many people living in larger homes are renting storage units to store more stuff. Why? i don't understand.
Well, a question or so. Are frugal people poor? Have they no special valuables in their house? No need for safes? And if they have a safe deposit box down at the bank, is that not an example of an outside storage unit?

As far as safes go, it started as a briefcase fire safe for documents and special projects computer media, into a tall cabinet for silver and other precious metals, and finally into a safe room.

As to external storage, have never done it. Been tempted so many times but never done it for it was, to me, too easy a situation of out of sight, out of mind,.........and lost to time, forever.

Finally, perhaps a key question here, when it comes to "stuff" is.....is the person in question of specialist nature or generalist nature? Nutshell wise, in a specialist society, people have a certain job that do and when it comes to being asked to do something else, a common response may be "That's not my job!". In a generalist society, everyone is cross trained to take over for others for if the job doesn't get done, people don't eat.

Me, I'm a generalist extraordinaire, a Renaissance Lady, know so much, can do so many things. A problem with that, however, in relation to our discussion here, is that it can be so gear intensive over time. Even if you find something that is great, that you just need that because it can do so much.......you end up having so much of it. Like paracord, for instance.
Quote:
Originally Posted by heavymind View Post
Enjoy the purge! It's a liberating feeling not being burdened with so much stuff. I do a purge 1-2 times a year, and if I don't truly love something, out it goes...usually back to the thrift store where I found it in the first place. Donating unused items is an easy way to be charitable and I never bother trying to sell things for money (with the exception of vehicles), better to pass them on to someone in need.
Liberating......or feeling like a Goddess? To me, your efforts remind me of camp outs where I am out there with my pickup truck, loaded with so many things, so many goodies. At the end, I am giving the food that wasn't eaten to "poor, starving college students", the spoils of my life's adventures, the Lady of the Manor in "Robin Hood", and YES, I do love feeling Godlike.

Now, maybe, it is the same thing, liberating or Godlike, the same coin, and we just have different ways of doing it. Of course, in my case, there is that issue of where to put it until the Festival.

It's not pretty being a Mistress.......of the Lands, but someone has to do it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by heavymind View Post
Are you sure? Sometimes I read the real estate ads of these absurdly huge mansions (actual mansions, not McMansions) that have, say, 7 bedrooms and 15 bathrooms. WTF? Why does one dwelling need so many bathrooms? For guests and parties? Ridiculous.
..........
CATS! Those aren't bathrooms but cat, perhaps dog, rooms. A nice thing about bathrooms, especially with dogs, is that the floor that was designed to get wet is much easier to clean up.

Last edited by TamaraSavannah; 09-09-2023 at 06:12 PM..
 
Old 09-09-2023, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Military City, USA.
5,574 posts, read 6,500,449 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by farm108 View Post
1 - Yes.
2 - Yes.
3 - Probably for a limited time.

I'm from Europe, everything is tiny there compared to the US.
You can say that again. Went to England to nanny my first grandchild in 2006 for a few months. My American car (full size Cadillac) would NOT fit down the streets. Family was blessed to find a brand new house to rent while in the Military. 5 bedrooms, no closets, 3 upstairs, 2 downstairs. They used 1 upstairs bedroom as a walk in closet. Small bedroom on first floor was used as a dining room, second small bedroom on first floor used as an office. Small washing machine in kitchen, dryer in the unattached garage. I got home, walked through the door of my 2160 sf house with high ceilings and promptly said "I truly am a spoiled American".

Now that I am alone, I love my current home, for me as a single. If hubby was still here we would need more room. I could do away with the second bedroom and second full bath and definitely live in a smaller home. I think I could live in a tiny house. I am no longer "sentimental" to all my "stuff".
 
Old 09-09-2023, 05:36 PM
 
11,412 posts, read 7,799,958 times
Reputation: 21923
Quote:
Originally Posted by heavymind View Post
I don't get it either. There's a bedroom community in my area that in the past two years has EXPLODED with storage units. Acres and acres of storage buildings. Such an eyesore! There's even a site currently under construction where one can purchase a storage unit in a complex for something like $150,000, "a place to keep all your toys" as it's advertised. Sounds like a bad investment to me.
I think there are 2 types of storage unit folks:

Those like me who had a short term unit after we sold and hadn’t yet bought another place. After we bought and completed our reno, everything was moved to the new place, sold or donated as quickly as possible. Paying $300 a month for any longer than necessary wasn’t something I was going to do.

Then there are those who pay for one for YEARS. I have a SIL who’s had one for TEN years because she can’t face sorting through and getting rid of her parent’s stuff. And she’s not the only one. When we had our unit, we met a couple who was there almost every weekend either adding to their unit or rummaging through it looking for something. They told us they’d had their 10’ x 20’ for 5 years and were planning on cleaning it out…. someday. Even if their cost started lower than ours did (which I’m sure it did) that’s still a likely cost of 10-12k during that time. What a phenomenal waste of money!
 
Old 09-09-2023, 05:41 PM
 
2,048 posts, read 990,078 times
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I had a friend like that, who kept mom's stuff in a storage unit for something like 5 years after she died. I totally understand how it can be difficult to deal with, but five years? Ten years? What would bother me more is sitting on a bunch of stuff that could be put to good use by someone who really needs it. Just pull out the photos and personal mementos, and let all the other crap go...
 
Old 09-09-2023, 06:07 PM
 
3,934 posts, read 2,184,548 times
Reputation: 9996
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetgraphics View Post
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khrushchevka

In America, you'll find single family housing (SFH), whereas in the former USSR, you'll find block after block of 5 story apartments, made of panelized concrete and compact in comparison to American counterparts.
Typical apartments of the K-7 series have a total area of 30 m2 (323 sq ft) (one-room), 44 m2 (474 sq ft) (two-room) and 60 m2 (646 sq ft) (three-room). Later designs further reduced these meager areas.
[ A typical American "starter home" is between 1200 and 1400 sq ft ]

64,000 units (3,000,000 m2 (32,000,000 sq ft)) of this type were built in Moscow from 1961 to 1968. The Khrushchyovkas were cheap, and sometimes an entire building could be constructed within two weeks.

I could find no specific tally of the number of Khrushchyovkas built across the Soviet Union. Vague references to millions having been built - and nothing more.

https://www.aljazeera.com/gallery/20...ure-in-ukraine

The bulk of the Ukrainian capital’s housing stock dates from the times of Soviet leaders Joseph Stalin, Nikita Khrushchev, and Leonid Brezhnev. These housing blocks – containing dozens of apartments with four to six square-metre kitchens, thin brick walls, midget hallways and one to three rooms – are known as Khrushchyovkas and represent a big percentage of total housing in Kiev today: 3,055 buildings that include some 211,512 apartments.

: : : : : : : : : : :
Humorous music video showing the peculiarities of the khrushchyovka. Pioneers of the "tiny house" concept, indeed. From the movie : Stilyagi ("Hipsters").

https://youtu.be/UavmKtLIV3Y?t=597
That type of housing was due to the devastating housing and other losses Russia/USSR suffered in 1 revolution and 3 wars - the World War I, their 5 years of civil war after the revolution and their most obliterating World War II .

They had cities and towns completely destroyed by Germans bombing and shelling.

After the war they had to build cheap and fast.
As we know you only can have 2 out of 3 in construction:cheap, fast, good.

Their country have chosen cheap and fast. I have read that they even used German prisoners of war to build- not professionals

It didn’t help that according to their laws - their housing was provided FREE - their population did not know what mortgage is.

Not sure about sound transmission - the walks of those apartments are at least 25-30 inches and internal walls are at least 8”.

I was showing a new development to a Russian and he had admired the model house in a fancy golf course development.

His admiration turned to horror when he saw the house being build : he couldn’t believe that the walls were made of plywood and 2x 4 lumber.
He called it cardboard houses

Last edited by L00k4ward; 09-09-2023 at 06:17 PM..
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