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Old 03-21-2024, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Argentina
268 posts, read 57,004 times
Reputation: 195

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewMexicoCowboy View Post
Well we have a pickup, a SUV and a sedan that are gasoline-powered. Most vehicles where I live are powered by gasoline. There are lots of diesel vehicles where I live. I would like to have a diesel someday. One of the reasons why I like vehicles powered by diesel is because its a safer fuel than gasoline.However I did see a EV pickup yesterday.I see so many gasoline vehicles every time I am on the road in America.
There are also diesel vehicles here, but gas-powered ones are much cheaper. I bought a new van, and a year after I had it, I adapted it to gas. That way I save at least 50% on fuel. The contra... The van's computer went crazy because it didn't recognize the gas equipment implanted.
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Old 03-21-2024, 07:48 PM
 
4,343 posts, read 2,228,168 times
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In CA, we've demonized natural gas and nuclear to go green.

I'd say our energy is imported - pretty slick, eh?
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Old 03-21-2024, 08:04 PM
 
1,861 posts, read 838,044 times
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i got heat pump, its $91 a month
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Old 03-21-2024, 11:27 PM
 
Location: The Republic of Molossia
712 posts, read 394,577 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luis Antonio View Post
There are also diesel vehicles here, but gas-powered ones are much cheaper. I bought a new van, and a year after I had it, I adapted it to gas. That way I save at least 50% on fuel. The contra... The van's computer went crazy because it didn't recognize the gas equipment implanted.
Ya most of the diesels where I live are heavy duty pickups and big rigs and stuff like that.I priced a heavy duty pickup and the diesel option was about 12,000 more dollars than the standard gas engine.I am willing to pay the premium for a diesel if I find a vehicle that suits me once I get ready for a diesel.Most of the power for the homes where I live is generated by natural gas. We also have wind and solar power in my state.We have some nuclear power too in my state.There are very few half ton and mid-sized pickups and sedans where I live that are diesel powered.I am currently thinking about getting a diesel powered sedan but I will prolly get a gas vehicle or hybrid instead.

Last edited by NewMexicoCowboy; 03-21-2024 at 11:58 PM..
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Old 03-22-2024, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Wooster, Ohio
4,140 posts, read 3,046,164 times
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Ohio electricity generation is 50.7% natural gas, 31.8% coal, and 12.4% nuclear.
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Old 03-22-2024, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
14,147 posts, read 9,043,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luis Antonio View Post
Sure, a lot of people use firewood, especially in the countryside where it's easy and cheap to get. Fortunately, most manage to keep their home free of burn.
In the countryside, however, bottling gas is also used. Here they are called "garrafas y tubos". I'm not sure what they're called in English. That's why I show you the photos to make it clearer.
We would call those containers "tanks" or "bottles" in the United States. Do either "garrafas" or "tubos" translate to one or both of those words?

Quote:
That's something I'd like to know.If you know/ever use this type of vehicle. Neither in the USA nor in Europe have I seen gas-powered vehicles, while here there are more and more. By the way, in line with that, there are more and more gas(gasoline) stations that sell gas. From the precautions that they are taken, I deduce that full them are quite dangerous, although it is very rare to hear of a car exploding. There were some cases though.
In the US, you will find some commercial vehicles — buses and light trucks mainly — that run on compressed natural gas, but gas is not used as a fuel for personal vehicles. The big push here is to spread the adoption of electric-powered vehicles as a way to reduce CO2 emissions. In many cases, EV use merely shifts the point of emissions from the tailpipe to the generating station, especially if coal is the fuel used to produce the electricity. Natural gas burns cleaner but still produces CO2 when burned as well; just less of it.

The ideal combination for achieving zero-emission cars would be to use electric cars that get their juice from wind, solar, hydro, geothermal or nuclear. Next best: hydrogen fuel cells, which emit only water vapor. There are a few vehicles out there thst run on these.
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Old 03-22-2024, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Argentina
268 posts, read 57,004 times
Reputation: 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
We would call those containers "tanks" or "bottles" in the United States. Do either "garrafas" or "tubos" translate to one or both of those words?
Not exactly, because "bottle" is mostly translated as "botella".
Anyway, I get the idea. It also exists in the USA. That is the important thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
In the US, you will find some commercial vehicles — buses and light trucks mainly — that run on compressed natural gas, but gas is not used as a fuel for personal vehicles. The big push here is to spread the adoption of electric-powered vehicles as a way to reduce CO2 emissions.
Electric cars are very scarce around here. Maybe because they have little autonomy, in the sense that you have to charge it quite often. Also with gas-powered cars, the range is quite limited. My van does 180 kilometers. I mean... If I have to make a somewhat long trip, say 1,000 kilometers, I should visit a gas station more than 5 times along the way. If we consider that not all gasoline stations sell gas, it is advisable to fill the tank with gasoline, and alternate gas with gasoline to avoid problems.
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Old 03-22-2024, 06:52 PM
 
24,479 posts, read 10,815,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luis Antonio View Post
Not exactly, because "bottle" is mostly translated as "botella".
Anyway, I get the idea. It also exists in the USA. That is the important thing.



Electric cars are very scarce around here. Maybe because they have little autonomy, in the sense that you have to charge it quite often. Also with gas-powered cars, the range is quite limited. My van does 180 kilometers. I mean... If I have to make a somewhat long trip, say 1,000 kilometers, I should visit a gas station more than 5 times along the way. If we consider that not all gasoline stations sell gas, it is advisable to fill the tank with gasoline, and alternate gas with gasoline to avoid problems.
Considering distances in Oklahoma 180 km does not cover SO's weekend play date. He was in AZ in March. There is no gas station every 200 miles not to mention gas-gas.
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Old 03-22-2024, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
14,147 posts, read 9,043,710 times
Reputation: 10491
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luis Antonio View Post
Electric cars are very scarce around here. Maybe because they have little autonomy, in the sense that you have to charge it quite often. Also with gas-powered cars, the range is quite limited. My van does 180 kilometers. I mean... If I have to make a somewhat long trip, say 1,000 kilometers, I should visit a gas station more than 5 times along the way. If we consider that not all gasoline stations sell gas, it is advisable to fill the tank with gasoline, and alternate gas with gasoline to avoid problems.
The range for most battery-electric cars sold in the US is 240 to 300 miles (386 to 482 km); the model with the longest range, the Tesla Model 3 Long Range, can go 341 miles (548 km) between charges. And the EV charging infrastructure has grown steadily in this country; any of these cars are suitable for medium- to long-distance trips in the heavily populated Northeast and Midwest or in California. The main drawback, then, becomes charging time. But fast (250 kW) chargers can juice a Model 3 Long Range from zero to full in about an hour, and the fastest ones can do it in half that time.

That brings the time down to the point where electric cars become acceptable alternatives to gasoline- and diesel-powered cars for long journeys. Gas-electric hybrids, which can get fuel economy as high as 80 mpg if driven right, are just about as good. (I once did Philadelphia-Harrisburg — ~110 miles each way — on three gallons of gasoline driving a Toyota Prius.)
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Old 03-23-2024, 06:12 AM
 
Location: Wooster, Ohio
4,140 posts, read 3,046,164 times
Reputation: 7274
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
We would call those containers "tanks" or "bottles" in the United States. Do either "garrafas" or "tubos" translate to one or both of those words?



In the US, you will find some commercial vehicles — buses and light trucks mainly — that run on compressed natural gas, but gas is not used as a fuel for personal vehicles. The big push here is to spread the adoption of electric-powered vehicles as a way to reduce CO2 emissions. In many cases, EV use merely shifts the point of emissions from the tailpipe to the generating station, especially if coal is the fuel used to produce the electricity. Natural gas burns cleaner but still produces CO2 when burned as well; just less of it.

The ideal combination for achieving zero-emission cars would be to use electric cars that get their juice from wind, solar, hydro, geothermal or nuclear. Next best: hydrogen fuel cells, which emit only water vapor. There are a few vehicles out there thst run on these.
My school district does have some buses that run on propane. Long ago, when I was in school, all of the buses had gasoline engines. Only one bus had an automatic transmission. In fact, one rear-engined bus had manual steering.
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