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Old 10-24-2013, 08:26 AM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,244 posts, read 7,125,559 times
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$200/month is about right for me, too, when it comes to food (for home cooked food), for a single person. Like you I do shop quailty, and certain specialty items (like herbs and spices...I cook a lot with these... and better cheese and higher-quality baked goods like bread & pastries....) drive the price up
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Old 10-24-2013, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Upstate NY 🇺🇸
36,754 posts, read 14,680,135 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZugZub View Post
,... you do not buy any prepackaged food, ....

You hit the nail on the head, as this is one of the keys to not wasing money. You wouldn' t believe the number of people not only at the prepared foods aisle, but also tossing pre-cut, sliced, etc. produce into their carts.

I saw a cooking show on Food Network the other day in which contestants had a budget to shop for certain foods to be used in recipes. One young girl picked up a package of sliced zucchini for $3.99, which brought her just over her spending limit. She ended up returning spices instead of simply exchanging the packaged zucchini for unpackaged.

People who waste money like this in the real world are their own worst enemies.
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Old 10-24-2013, 12:00 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
4,244 posts, read 7,125,559 times
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Quote:
You hit the nail on the head, as this is one of the keys to not wasing money. You wouldn' t believe the number of people not only at the prepared foods aisle, but also tossing pre-cut, sliced, etc. produce into their carts.
Well...i'll buy frozen veggies, but thats as far as I'll go. I figure for a salad i can chop my own stuff up.
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Old 10-24-2013, 01:01 PM
 
1,614 posts, read 2,058,939 times
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I'm curious to see how cheap I can get. Partially because we spend a lot on food and eating out - seems like on some level, we'd be eating a lot healthier by budgeting ourselves. Right now we spend about 500 on groceries and then probably another few hundred on eating out.

I bought huge bags of rice and beans... I love curry, I'll have to look into that...
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Old 10-24-2013, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Miami, FL
8,087 posts, read 9,755,898 times
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My bill for two is about $500 per month to include inedibles-soap, paper towels, etc. Wife and I BOGO quite a bit. We rarely eat out due to our home cooking being so superior in taste and health values compared to restaurant food.(thanks to joining myfitnesspal.com!) We did eat out every weekend earlier this year and last year but scaled back to once per month as a date night.
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Old 10-25-2013, 10:09 PM
 
64 posts, read 134,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alamosakid View Post
I eat on about $50/month. No joke. Including drinks & the occasional doughnut, soda, and lunch with coworkers/friends (which comprises a good 40% of my budget).

Grocery list:
1. Spices, spices, spices! A MUST in terms of "investments" when you're on a tight budget.
2. Flour, for making Chapati (kind of tastes like a thicker, chewier tortilla but can be seasoned to anyone's taste and 8 of these [silver-dollar pancake size], a huge meal, works about to 20 cents!)
3. Cooking oil, for making Chapati
4. Ramen. Ramen is cheaper than other types of pasta, and works out to a 15-30 cent meal (depending on how hungry I am lol). Nuff said.
5. Rice. Can be seasoned to anyone's taste and costs, at least where I live, about $1/lb
6. Potatoes. I live in a region that is the second largest grower of potatoes in the States and when I can't get them for free, I end up paying no more than 50 cents a pound.
7. Bread. Bread and butter works, too, at least if you get your bread on the discount shelf for <75 cents/loaf

Yeah, my diet sucks @ss but it keeps me alive and lets me work less and enjoy life more!
Your example is EXACTLY what I was discussing on another thread about people surviving on certain amount of money for food (the thread discussing gov't lowering food stamps). Either one will buy expensive items and run out of money, and be hungry and/ or malnourished, or live on staples such as you mentioned and get overweight - and BOTH will eventually mess up your health. Neither way is healthy.

Where are the veggies and fruits or fish? (fish can get costly, depending, but canned tuna in water - low sodium, is almost always on sale) This would be a good temporary survival food lets say for young college students who are skinny as a rail. Eventually, one will put on mass weight eating nothing but bread, butter, potatoes, rice, pastas. My lord, wait till the diabetes sets in and heart problems to mention a few! I pray for you that your eating habits are not lifelong. All those carbohydrates and gluten..... if I ate like this, it would very possibly be life threatening (for those who don't know me here, I have LUPUS).

Also, I didn't get to quote something that Dayton Sux mentioned in this thread somewhere.... I don't remember word for word. I also see for example people throwing in all kinds of sliced items from the deli in their carts, ok, once in a blue moon for a sandwich treat, but the amount of salt in deli meats are insane! Yes, costly too. If I want an occasional sandwich (very rare for me, either a tuna salad, or I will make a roast or bake a chicken, and use those meats). Of course, sales, sales and more sales. My problem is I have access to a grocery store whos prices are high, and just today I was lucky to work out a ride to a store quite a way from home and I got the same items for about half the price normally! I will find a way to shop there from now on! More fresh produce!!!! Yes!
Alamosakid - I do hope you get regular check ups from your doctor and blood work at labs regularly. You could get sick ****snap! just like that overnight! My thoughts and support are here for you, I understand the need financially, yet know what suffering is like when one has illness.
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Old 10-26-2013, 10:00 AM
 
1,721 posts, read 1,616,851 times
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I usually use the shredded cheese that come in a package because it's easier. My daughter says it doesn't have the flavor of cheese that you shredded yourself and she's so right. I'm not only saving money by buying a block of cheese and shredding it myself but mmmmmmmmm the taste difference.
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Old 10-26-2013, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Upstate NY 🇺🇸
36,754 posts, read 14,680,135 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayton Sux View Post
Well...i'll buy frozen veggies, but thats as far as I'll go. I figure for a salad i can chop my own stuff up.

Frozen food is not "prepared food" any more than canned food is when we're speaking of price. In addition, it's also more healthful, as it's frozen at its peak of freshness. Who even knows how long the "fresh" produce has been sitting on that nicely-sprayed display, or how long it took to get there in transit?
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Old 10-26-2013, 01:56 PM
 
3,971 posts, read 3,987,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yukiko11 View Post
Your worst enemy is convenience foods followed by fast food.
Your best friend is your freezer and your electric plastic bag vaccum sealer.
When I cook, items like pasta, sauces, soups, beans and rice I cook in family sized quantities. This cuts down on my utilities. It takes just as much power to cook a lb of rice as a 1/2 cup. I package everything in single servings and put it in the freezer.
I buy meat products in large packages when it is on sale and package it in single servings.
When I am feeding more than one, I just pull additional packages.
That leaves me with a grocery list of fresh/frozen vegetables, bread, and fruit.
I will occasionally purchase fast food. For instance, I can get a fresh baked 18" 12 slice pizza at Costco for $10.00. When it cools, I package it two slices at a time and freeze it. I sprinkle a little olive oil on the crust and re-heat it in the toaster oven. It tasts just like fresh baked.
It takes some money to set up a proper pantry with staples and lots of spices etc, but once you have established that it is easy to replenish within your budget.
What I have described is not a fixed 150/month. Sometimes it is more, mostly it is less.
I like the pizza idea. How long can you freeze it before it's no good?
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Old 10-26-2013, 02:19 PM
 
1,236 posts, read 1,350,899 times
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On Friday's in my area Harris Teeter sells an 8 piece bucket of fried chicken for $4.99 -- you can also get 8 pieces of baked chicken. I know it might not be the greatest for you but that is pretty cheap -- and the fried chicken is amazingly good. I am also a super "cherry picker" at the grocery store -- studying the weekly flyers and particularly looking out for BOGO free items. If I have a coupon that is a double bonus in savings for me. For instance this week whole grain Arnold bread is BOGO and I have a $1 coupon if you buy two -- that means I am paying $2.99 for two loaves of good whole grain bread. I double wrap the loaves in plastic grocery bags for extrta protection and then freeze them. When I defrost them I use the plastic bags for the kitty litter box.
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