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Old 06-13-2010, 02:20 AM
Status: "Practice random acts of kindness and goodwill." (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
19,586 posts, read 24,527,942 times
Reputation: 51913

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I want a garden that reflects my homes past. 1905-1921
I do not want anything too contrived or difficult to maintain - but I do not want plantings that do not go with the era of my house.
I think of ladies sipping lemonade under porches protected by heavy green and white canvass awnings and I like to think that as they indulge in watercress cucumber and butter sandwiches, that in May at least, that the fragrance of Lilacs would be part of the picture.

Would they and if so, what other plants, bushes and flowers would be there?
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Old 06-13-2010, 06:10 AM
 
1,028 posts, read 1,574,546 times
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Visit the Strawberry Banke garden website for lists of plants. Our Gardens
There's also a garden plan for the Thomas Bailey Aldrich 1908 Colonial Revival Garden. Colonial revival was hot in the early decades of the 20th century.
Check their lists of 19th and 20th c. plants.
I have several 1920's magazines, and gardening articles mention nasturtiums, gaillardia, phlox, calendula, candytuft, larkspur, petunias, strawflower, pansies, snapdragons, verbena, four o' clocks, marigolds, garden pinks and carnations.
One article from 1923 is about a garden designed with: Japanese yews, Canadian hemlock,English ivy,Magnolia glauca, juniperus virginiana, sumac, snowberry, wisteria, evergreen euonymous, peonies, crocus, grape hyacinth, tulips, iris cristata, arabis, forget me not, trollius,columbines, lupines, blue aster Climax, chrysanthemums, German iris, New England aster, rudbeckia triloba, dogwoods, pinus resinosa, forsythia, helenium, syringa, bush honeysuckle ( I grew up in old neighborhoods where there was always honeysuckle somewhere) lilacs, muhgo pines, rhododendrons, azaleas, trillium, cowslip, violets, foam flower, hepaticas, scillas, daffodils, Solomon's seal, funkia, monkshood, lilies, Japanese maple, magnolia, creeping phlox, violas, polemonium, Siberian iris, anemonies, narcissus, primroses, German iris, roses, pyrethrum, deutzia, boltonias.
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Old 06-13-2010, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,810 posts, read 14,383,328 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2cold View Post
Visit the Strawberry Banke garden website for lists of plants. Our Gardens
Great site!! Thanks for the link.
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Old 06-13-2010, 09:18 PM
Status: "Practice random acts of kindness and goodwill." (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
19,586 posts, read 24,527,942 times
Reputation: 51913
Thank you all! What a great link!
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Old 06-14-2010, 08:23 AM
 
7,742 posts, read 11,239,962 times
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I absolutely love the character of old homes and quaint gardens. We are fortunate to have an older home in a small rural town, and also a very deep back yard. I try to keep my plantings with the era of our home, built before 1900. Hydrangeas are in abundance, as well as shasta daisies, lilies, ivy and cool ground covers in the shade. Garden parties are always happening here for local townspeople (planning one 2 weeks from now) and I could spend days on end working and enjoying back there. Shabby Chic is still my thing, and I love those quaint touches, even a chandelier on a tree branch over a little sitting area hidden away between the pines.

Thanks for that nice site!

Last edited by rdlr; 04-27-2011 at 07:42 AM..
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Old 06-14-2010, 01:56 PM
 
Location: NW Indiana
41,103 posts, read 15,878,924 times
Reputation: 105055
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdlr View Post
I absolutely love the character of old homes and quaint gardens. We are fortunate to have an older home in a small rural town, and also a very deep back yard. I try to keep my plantings with the era of our home, built before 1900. Hydrangeas are in abundance, as well as shasta daisies, lilies, ivy and cool ground covers in the shade. Garden parties are always happening here for local townspeople (planning one 2 weeks from now) and I could spend days on end working and enjoying back there. Shabby Chic is still my thing, and I love those quaint touches, even a chandelier on a tree branch over a little sitting area hidden away between the pines.

Thanks for that nice site!
This is nice, rdlr! Thanks for sharing.
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Old 06-14-2010, 04:10 PM
 
2,063 posts, read 6,714,457 times
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Sheena there are several places to look at for inspiration right on LI and some might even have some plant lists and recommendations.

In case I didn't think of the best here is a good list of parks that include those with gardens and programs: Sierra Club: Long Island Group | Green Places

The first place I thought of was the Old Westbury Gardens. It's been many years since I was there but at the time they had people who you could talk to about horticulture of LI, including historical gardening. index (http://www.oldwestburygardens.org/index.htm - broken link)

Closer to Stony Brook is Bayard Arboretum: Bayard Cutting Arboretum - donated in memory of William Bayard Cutting. (http://www.bayardcuttingarboretum.com/index.htm - broken link)

Then there is the granddaddy of them all, which would be the NY Botanical gardens in the Bronx, not quite LI anymore but still within reach. New York Botanical Garden

I believe flowering perennials like Phlox and Shasta Daisies might have been grown back then in gardens on LI. The varieties available today would not be the same but might be more easy to obtain. I'm not sure what annuals were popular, though. I didn't think it would be so tough to find some ideas on line! You may have better luck researching Victorian era Gardens for ideas. There were a lot more formal gardens then, with Gazebos that would have carried into the first decade of the 20th century. Try this for a start:
Victorian Garden | Garden Furniture | Outdoor Garden | Garden Design

Here's a list for a period garden:http://www.strawberybanke.org/images...ardens20th.pdf

Last edited by J&Em; 06-14-2010 at 04:12 PM.. Reason: forgot link
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