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Old 09-12-2010, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,810 posts, read 16,204,423 times
Reputation: 33001

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No one picked beans for me while I was on vacation for two weeks so what came in while I was gone is now overly mature. Some are completely dried, which I will save for seed for next year, but the rest are in varying stages past their prime and are probably no longer tender. Can they be salvaged and processed some way so they won't be stringy and tough or should I just let all of them dry out and use them as dried beans? I canned about 10 quarts earlier in the summer when they were green and tender but I'm leery about what to do with these last-of-the-season ones. Any suggestions???
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Old 09-12-2010, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
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Like they say, whatever you do to them, they aren't going to improve by freezing or canning...I would just use them for seed.
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Old 09-14-2010, 07:11 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
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Use them for shelly beans. They are quite good. You remove the beans from the pod and mix them with your green ones. Saute onion in bacon grease, add your beans, bacon, and some water and cover with a lid. When the water has cooked down check them. If the beans are still a bit firm add a little more water and cook longer. YUM!
My MIL went on vacation one year and told me I could pick her green beans while she was gone. I was new to gardening and when I saw the drying green beans I thought they weren't edible for humans so I fed them to my BIL's goats. Boy was my MIL mad. Then I found out that you could use them for shelly beans. hehe
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Old 09-14-2010, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Little Rock AR USA
2,457 posts, read 7,379,749 times
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Phawk57 is correct and I will add to that. I grew up in the country here in AR and Granny always saved and dried her excess beans and we had beans all winter. You cook them as you would the dried beans you buy in the store. (If y'all do that out there)
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Old 09-14-2010, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Little Rock AR USA
2,457 posts, read 7,379,749 times
Reputation: 1901
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArkansasSlim View Post
Phawk57 is correct and I will add to that. I grew up in the country here in AR and Granny always saved and dried her excess beans and we had beans all winter. You cook them as you would the dried beans you buy in the store. (If y'all do that out there)
And shelling those dried bean pods would eat our fingers up!
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Old 09-14-2010, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,810 posts, read 16,204,423 times
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Thanks for the suggestion. That's what I did this evening--shelled them and set the not-quite-dry ones out to finish drying along with the already-dry ones. Not a whole lot of beans without the pods but that's OK. I already have seven quarts of the green ones canned earlier.
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Old 09-15-2010, 08:35 PM
 
1,963 posts, read 5,621,334 times
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The one's that aren't shriveled up can probably cooked like flat Romano beans. My mom braises them with herbs & garlic & chicken stock for 30 min. If they're overgrown Blue Lake you can probably reduce the time. Also if the pods are simply overgrown but still somewhat tender you can pass them through one of those Frenching slicer gadgets and cook as usual.
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Old 09-22-2010, 08:08 PM
 
2,794 posts, read 4,155,087 times
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Glad I read this thread! I have some Logan's Giants that are about 6-8 inches long, & unsure of what to do w/ them! They are huge!
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Old 09-23-2010, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Neither here nor there
14,810 posts, read 16,204,423 times
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I'm so glad I asked the question about overly mature green beans. I've harvested a couple of cupfuls of dried beans from the latecomers on the bean plants--I let them stay on the plant until the pods are dried up and then harvest them.
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