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Old 03-21-2011, 12:24 PM
 
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I have a question for a hobby farmer. My brother has a small 75 acre farm. He has about a 30 acre pasture and a 20 acre patch of woodlands. We were trying to think of what we could do with the remaining 25 acres.
This lot would also be good for a pasture or cropland. We were thinking of switching the pastures every year. OR We were thinking to plant tomato, sweet corn, or alfalfa/timmothy (for winter storage)? Any ideas shared would be greatly appreciated!!!

Last edited by mossberg14; 03-21-2011 at 01:03 PM..
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Old 03-21-2011, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
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a pasture is grass for livestock to eat. I wouldn't think switching from crop to pasture and back would be advisable. You'd have to replant the pasture after harvesting whatever crop you planted, and assuming it was ready to eat off by next spring (not likely) repeat every season. you might plant the 25 into hay. It'd take a couple yrs to get really established but then would be pretty self-sustainging for 5 yrs or so, depending on the type of grasses you'd planted. I'd recommend either talking with the local co-operative extension office or a local farmer.
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Old 03-21-2011, 01:26 PM
 
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Do a web search on "market gardens." There are some real horror stories about them, the labor involved, the large chances of the crop being destroyed, and the small payback.
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Old 03-21-2011, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
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He might want to consider leasing those acres to someone who already has livestock and needs hay but does not have enough land to grow all that they need. That person would already have all the necessary equipment to grow, harvest and bale the hay and that stuff ain't cheap. Your brother wouldn't get rich quick (or even slow) but around here they usually pay a proportional amount of the property taxes. maintain the fencing and last but not least keep the land from becoming overgrown with weeds and other undesirable stuff.
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Old 03-21-2011, 03:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zugor View Post
He might want to consider leasing those acres to someone who already has livestock and needs hay but does not have enough land to grow all that they need. That person would already have all the necessary equipment to grow, harvest and bale the hay and that stuff ain't cheap. Your brother wouldn't get rich quick (or even slow) but around here they usually pay a proportional amount of the property taxes. maintain the fencing and last but not least keep the land from becoming overgrown with weeds and other undesirable stuff.
nah he wants to use it up. he has a really good job and literally farms for the love, and not the money. he would grow a pumpkin patch before he leases it out. but thanks for the thought.
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Old 03-21-2011, 06:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mossberg14 View Post
I have a question for a hobby farmer. My brother has a small 75 acre farm. He has about a 30 acre pasture and a 20 acre patch of woodlands. We were trying to think of what we could do with the remaining 25 acres.
This lot would also be good for a pasture or cropland. We were thinking of switching the pastures every year. OR We were thinking to plant tomato, sweet corn, or alfalfa/timmothy (for winter storage)? Any ideas shared would be greatly appreciated!!!
Ask around where he lives if there's strong demand for horse feeds. I have a co-worker who farms his 14 acres for hays for horse feeds. Apparently there are different grade of hays and they command pretty good prices. He says that this is a hobby and helps pay for his farm equipment, but I'd suspect he makes a pretty good income out of it.
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Old 03-21-2011, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
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yes, there are different types of hay. Horses have more finicky stomachs than cows-their hay sells for more but then a smaller market. If money isn't really an issue (color me jealous) I'd definitely do hay, and maybe a few acres of veggies or fruit trees/blueberry bushes-just for the ummm fun (?) of it.
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Old 03-26-2011, 11:47 PM
 
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Originally Posted by PAhippo View Post
yes, there are different types of hay. Horses have more finicky stomachs than cows-their hay sells for more but then a smaller market. If money isn't really an issue (color me jealous) I'd definitely do hay, and maybe a few acres of veggies or fruit trees/blueberry bushes-just for the ummm fun (?) of it.
Owners of horses I know will pay more for the "first cut" hay, swearing it has more nutrients. Also, one friend told me she only gets small square bales as large round ones often get vermin rolled in: cows can deal with it, horses can't. And organic field crops bring the most money -- but my neighbor who has them had to get the land totally free of any commercial pesticide for over 3 years prior to getting his certification.
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Old 03-27-2011, 12:34 PM
 
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grow soybeans and sell them green (Edamame), i was surprise to see most Edamame sold in grocery stores are imported from China. The US grow soybeans more than any other country in the world, we still have to buy frozen soybean from China.
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Old 03-27-2011, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Kailua Kona, HI
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What is the annual rainfall in your area? This should help you decide, as you don't want to have to irrigate if you can help it. Unless you have the equipment the expense would be very high to start out with something that needs a lot of water.

I vote for the hay crop too plus some fruit trees if your rainfall will work for those 2 things.
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