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Old 05-06-2011, 05:13 PM
 
15 posts, read 58,207 times
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I just completely redid my back yard. We planted grass and lots of shrubs. A lot of the shrubs seem to be dying. We are in Denver sandy soil the whole yard was amended when we planted the grass with a good compost. Since we have planted we have had freezing temperatures, only at night. Most of the shrubs have only been in the ground a month (or less). I was watering 4 times a day in short spurts so as not to flood the back, but then i turn it off for a couple days, Now im just doing once a day 10 min. Are these plants not getting enough water, was it the cold temperatures? I bought these at Home Depot and they will return anything...should i return and start over.

Pics:
First two are japenese barberry one is really withered the others not so bad
3rd is forsythia it looked a little sick
4th-5th the sadest my purpleleaf sand cherry one is really witthered it looks like the others will get there
last is climbing hydrangea it looked a little frost nipped

Please help
Attached Thumbnails
Any help? Plants seem to be dying...-plants-036.jpg   Any help? Plants seem to be dying...-plants-037.jpg   Any help? Plants seem to be dying...-plants-038.jpg   Any help? Plants seem to be dying...-plants-039.jpg   Any help? Plants seem to be dying...-plants-040.jpg  

Any help? Plants seem to be dying...-plants-041.jpg   Any help? Plants seem to be dying...-plants-043.jpg  
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Old 05-06-2011, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Columbus, Ohio
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Did you research the soil requirements? I know you mentioned the soil was amended but did you check to see if it was correct for the bushes? Usually HD will only sell plants that will thrive in your area so the freeze should not have been an issue I do not believe.

Did you plant them deep enough?
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Old 05-06-2011, 05:31 PM
 
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i planted the shrubs per the instructions...i may have gotten a little lazy and done 1.75 deep instead of twice the depth of the pot (hope that isnt the problem). a local nursery told me to amend the soil with 2-3 yards of compost per 1000 sq/ft. for the grass seed. the shrub instruction was to amend the hole with compost. so i wouldnt think that would be it
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Old 05-06-2011, 07:21 PM
 
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Bildivarian, they don't look as though they have been watered. Have you watered them? Newly planted plants need lots of loving attention especially with water. Your plants could also be suffering from transplant shock, depending on how roughly you handled them prior to and during the planting process.

I recommend watering them and adding a root boost to the soil around the plants. This ideally should have been added during the planting process, but if you carefully put the root boost in the soil around each plant and then water it in, it should do the trick.

Good luck! If you are not sure what a root boost is, ask the nursery where you bought the plants. They will be able to lead you to the correct product.
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Old 05-06-2011, 07:41 PM
 
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Thanks a lot for the replies. I was just out watering everything. at first i thought things were getting too much water. I have sprinklers or drip lines by all the plants but i think what is happening is the soil is so dense and absorbs water very slowly, as evidence of water running off every where in the yard including away from the shrubs when i water. I will give everything extra attention and water and also try the root booster. Do you think these shrubs will snap back? O also i used miracle grow time release fertilizer in the hole when i planted these...Could i insert a dripline into the soil down to the root ball to help penetrate the stubborn soil? Or would that be to much water?
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Old 05-06-2011, 08:40 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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I'd go the other way. If the soil is so dense and you didn't dig very deep, the original soil is making a dense bowl that keeps the water in the mulched area around the roots, and these plants cannot take that much water, they will get root rot and eventually die. There is a reason they suggested the larger holes. Also, shallow planting means that despite the hardiness of the plants, the roots can freeze right at 32. With deeper planting they'd be good a lot colder. Really though, if it's getting that cold it's too early to be transplanting
except for bare root.
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Old 05-06-2011, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
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I am going to assume you made sure the plants are hardy for your area and suited for the conditions in your yard.
1. Do not fertilize. Newly planted trees and shrubs do not need fertilizer for at least a year. Fertilizer applied can burn their roots and foliage and decrease the amount of water they can absorb. Take up the stakes etc.

2. Hardy nursery plants can sometimes get foliage damage from freezing temps. This is because they've been in a 'protected' environment and may not have hardened off. Frosts can cause some leaf damage, but may not kill the plant.

3. Water deeply and once a week - you are harming the plants by doing shallow watering. The roots won't grow deep so that the shrubs can survive. If water is not staying on the soil here are tips:
tip - make a little basin in the soil around the root area to capture water so it stays around the roots when you water.

tip - Mulch around each shrub. Leave a couple of inches free of mulch around the stem. Mulch on the ground will retain moisture in the soil for the water that you'll only apply weekly (approx).

tip - when watering, it sometimes pays to wet the soil first, and then water in little spurts to make sure the water's absorbed. Again, pls water deeply and less often.
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Old 05-06-2011, 09:19 PM
 
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kinkytoes does it look these shrubs can recover?
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Old 05-06-2011, 11:26 PM
 
Location: rain city
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Unfortunately you have not told us where you are. Location matters.

Your soil looks poor. Low in organic matter, dry and hard. From the condition of the soil I will also assume you are in a semi-arid area which usually includes high temperatures for much of the year, both day and night.

Mulch will help will help to hold in moisture and will break down to add organic matter to your dry dusty soil. So mulch is good.

But it will not make your plants thrive.

I think you need to choose your plants more carefully. See how the barberry is doing relatively well while the forsythia is suffering. Forsythia is pretty tough but is probably not well suited to your climate and soil conditions. Barberry is a more drought tolerant plant.

Most hot/dry areas also suffer from more alkaline soil conditions. You need to choose plants that will tolerate poor soil, alkaline soil, heat, and dry conditions. Choosing such plants that are better adapted to your growing conditions will bring greater success and less stress for you.
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Old 05-07-2011, 09:51 AM
 
15 posts, read 58,207 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bildivarian View Post
We are in Denver...sandy soil in the whole yard was amended
: original post
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