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Old 07-30-2011, 01:37 PM
 
10 posts, read 13,872 times
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Hi everyone! I am currently looking to shack up in a state where someone can get a decent piece of land for an inexpensive price and somewhere, specifically where farming is relatively possible year round. Dont have too many other requirements.. so.. Where are some good places in the US?
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Old 07-30-2011, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC dreaming of other places
983 posts, read 2,526,617 times
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I would say California but since you said inexpensive the head to the south where it rains most the year. North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia are great for gardening.
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Old 08-01-2011, 09:57 AM
 
Location: The Mitten
845 posts, read 1,342,349 times
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Hmm, why year round?

I'm sure it won't be year-round unless you head further south towards Florida or closer to the Equator.

I live in Michigan and there is still a lot of areas for good farming land. It's not possible to farm year-round here but there is still a need for farming.
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Old 08-01-2011, 10:09 AM
 
Location: The Triad
34,091 posts, read 82,438,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrianWS View Post
a decent piece of land...
an inexpensive price...
where farming is relatively possible year round.
It doesn't exist.
Trim your sails some or at least quantify your terms more.
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Old 12-12-2012, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Athens, Georgia
38 posts, read 119,352 times
Reputation: 69
The land near Sebring Florida seems ideal to me. The area south of Lake Placid is known as the Caladium capital of the world. There are lakes everywhere and you don't need to dig deep to hit water. It has an elevation above 90 feet and a high lime content in the soil. I grow just about every fruit tree possible in Athens Georgia, but vegetable gardening is almost impossible from DEC - FEB. There seems to be a lot of inexpensive real estate in the Sebring area due to over building and the economic downturn. Some folks will tell you about the heat, bugs, and lack of night life, but to a true garden enthusiast, I can't think of a better place than south central Florida... for the money.
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Old 12-12-2012, 10:42 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,785 posts, read 23,946,607 times
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I would most definately say south carolina and ga ... i would stay with those two florida is too hot and humid and you sweat to death while out gardening ... Ugh . and yes they have bugs in florida that will eat everything in sight and you wont stand a chance without a whole lot of pesticide in florida either so there you have my take on it . I know i lived in florida 18 yrs before finally watching everything go down hill and then I left and now Im headed to sc ... something I m going to very much enjoy .so yes south carolina for me . I want to have corn and tomatoes left after I plant them not stems and seeds LOL .
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Old 12-12-2012, 05:29 PM
Status: "Mistress of finance and foods." (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
49,966 posts, read 63,265,686 times
Reputation: 92398
Perhaps the Carolinas are Ok, but I can tell you that SE Georgia is not good. I don't know what kind of crops you want to grow, but I was an OK gardener in NE Ohio, but have failed miserably in GA.

It is too hot too soon to grow the typical northern crops in GA, I got no decent tomatoes, for example, and yet it is too cold to grow things like citrus in GA. Perhaps it is my fault, and I will keep trying, but to me, GA gardening stinks.
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Old 12-12-2012, 05:32 PM
Status: "Mistress of finance and foods." (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
49,966 posts, read 63,265,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fredmertz100 View Post
The land near Sebring Florida seems ideal to me. The area south of Lake Placid is known as the Caladium capital of the world. There are lakes everywhere and you don't need to dig deep to hit water. It has an elevation above 90 feet and a high lime content in the soil. I grow just about every fruit tree possible in Athens Georgia, but vegetable gardening is almost impossible from DEC - FEB. There seems to be a lot of inexpensive real estate in the Sebring area due to over building and the economic downturn. Some folks will tell you about the heat, bugs, and lack of night life, but to a true garden enthusiast, I can't think of a better place than south central Florida... for the money.
I know Lake Placid and the place I visited is near abundant caladium and citrus groves. The neighborhood where we visited had beautiful palms of all kinds. If this is what you want to grow, go for it. Any tender plant that you see at your local home improvement store probably would do fine. Vegetables? I doubt it.
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Old 12-12-2012, 10:35 PM
 
Location: oregon
899 posts, read 2,930,008 times
Reputation: 678
My vote hands down is the Willamette Valley of Oregon, great soil ,good year around climate and lots of savy gardeners and nurseries galore..
We moved up here from Northern California and I'm amazed at what a great place it is to play in the dirt...
Well thats my 2 cents worth..
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Old 12-12-2012, 11:00 PM
 
7,099 posts, read 27,098,242 times
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Most farmers don't have vegetables, etc. year 'round. They grow enough to can or freeze the extra for the off seasons.

Tomatoes are a good example. If you want them more than just a couple of months when they are in season, you'll have to learn how to can. It's a matter of the temperatures for what they need to sprout, then grow, and then finally set fruit and ripen.
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