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Old 03-09-2012, 10:14 AM
 
4,246 posts, read 11,568,831 times
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So I'm going to build a garden out of bricks I have and want to use a gutter to fill a barrel when it rains. This will be about 4ft above the ground to the bottom of the barrel. I will run a small hose under the ground about 6" to the garden which will be 10ft away.


This will be gravity feed and on a timer. What should I use to water the plants in the garden? Some type of low volume low pressure sprinkler head? A small home made soaker hose and use as many small hoses coming frome the barrel to insure even watering?

Got any better ideas? I plan on growing vegatables.
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Old 03-09-2012, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Aiken, South Carolina, US of A
1,794 posts, read 4,646,080 times
Reputation: 3664
Daniel,
You can't use any water for your veggies that comes down from a roof.
The roof tiles are poison.
It will be fine if it just goes into the barrel from the sky when it's raining.
You won't get as much water though.
Plants it's fine.
Don't use any water that runs off your roof for food that you will eat.
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Old 03-10-2012, 10:27 AM
 
4,246 posts, read 11,568,831 times
Reputation: 3149
That sux. Guess I'll just use the faucet then. Thanks for posting before I made the mistake.
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Old 03-10-2012, 12:42 PM
 
10,135 posts, read 26,206,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Butterfly4u View Post
Daniel,
You can't use any water for your veggies that comes down from a roof.
The roof tiles are poison.
It will be fine if it just goes into the barrel from the sky when it's raining.
You won't get as much water though.
Plants it's fine.
Don't use any water that runs off your roof for food that you will eat.
Quote:
Originally Posted by danieloneil01 View Post
That sux. Guess I'll just use the faucet then. Thanks for posting before I made the mistake.

OK, I'll bite.

The proof of this is exactly what?
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Old 03-10-2012, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
543 posts, read 1,100,248 times
Reputation: 461
Quote:
Originally Posted by Butterfly4u View Post
Daniel,
You can't use any water for your veggies that comes down from a roof.
The roof tiles are poison.
It will be fine if it just goes into the barrel from the sky when it's raining.
You won't get as much water though.
Plants it's fine.
Don't use any water that runs off your roof for food that you will eat.
People have been using water from their roofs to grow veggies for years.
Here's a test for your roof. If there are plants growing around the downspouts where the rainwater hits the ground, then it is safe. If it looks like everything dies (like roundup hit it) with the water, then it's not.

Cedar shingles can have added poisons in them... but do the same test. Harvesting rainwater is a good thing.
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Old 03-10-2012, 03:56 PM
 
10,135 posts, read 26,206,592 times
Reputation: 8361
Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsydoc View Post
People have been using water from their roofs to grow veggies for years.
Here's a test for your roof. If there are plants growing around the downspouts where the rainwater hits the ground, then it is safe. If it looks like everything dies (like roundup hit it) with the water, then it's not.

Cedar shingles can have added poisons in them... but do the same test. Harvesting rainwater is a good thing.

Hundreds of millions of people around the world rely on rooftop rain water runoff, and they often drink it without treatment, so I am looking forward to an authoritative source that says you can't even use it on a garden.
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Old 03-10-2012, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
543 posts, read 1,100,248 times
Reputation: 461
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
Hundreds of millions of people around the world rely on rooftop rain water runoff, and they often drink it without treatment, so I am looking forward to an authoritative source that says you can't even use it on a garden.
In your situation seems like the best thing to do is take some roof water and have it tested. Not sure of the cost, but I imagine each situation is different.

This link has several responses from several toxicology and biology scientists. It is a longer text but has several points of view based on their science. Also, several states are represented.

Safety of Rooftop / Rain Barrel Collected Water

This link is on biologic and sand filters:
Using roof water on a vegetable garden | Biological sand water filters and roof water harvesting

This link goes to rainwater quality tests and various materials:
Innovative Water Technologies - Rainwater Harvesting Projects | Texas Water Development Board

You'll need to weigh this information and maybe gather more before making a final decision. There are many variables to consider... what part of the country you live in, roof composition, temperature of the roof - if too warm, more leaching will occur, location of industries close by, etc.

I didn't realize there was an issue.. seemed like old roofs would have been done with their leaching already. I do live in the Pacific Northwest, and it mostly rains when it's really cold. We don't usually get ANY rain from the end of June until September, so summers are dry here. Rain is cold, so may not have as many contaminants.

The other issue of buying clean, organic food at the grocery stores is also a concern. Organic is quite expensive. Non-organic has the herbacide and pestacide contaminants. In fact, here's a list of the 12 dirtiest and 15 cleanest fruits and vegetables.

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/ar...tables/240492/

If it's not one thing, it's something else!!!
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Old 03-10-2012, 09:02 PM
 
10,135 posts, read 26,206,592 times
Reputation: 8361
Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsydoc View Post
In your situation seems like the best thing to do is take some roof water and have it tested. Not sure of the cost, but I imagine each situation is different.

This link has several responses from several toxicology and biology scientists. It is a longer text but has several points of view based on their science. Also, several states are represented.

Safety of Rooftop / Rain Barrel Collected Water

This link is on biologic and sand filters:
Using roof water on a vegetable garden | Biological sand water filters and roof water harvesting

This link goes to rainwater quality tests and various materials:
Innovative Water Technologies - Rainwater Harvesting Projects | Texas Water Development Board

You'll need to weigh this information and maybe gather more before making a final decision. There are many variables to consider... what part of the country you live in, roof composition, temperature of the roof - if too warm, more leaching will occur, location of industries close by, etc.

I didn't realize there was an issue.. seemed like old roofs would have been done with their leaching already. I do live in the Pacific Northwest, and it mostly rains when it's really cold. We don't usually get ANY rain from the end of June until September, so summers are dry here. Rain is cold, so may not have as many contaminants.

The other issue of buying clean, organic food at the grocery stores is also a concern. Organic is quite expensive. Non-organic has the herbacide and pestacide contaminants. In fact, here's a list of the 12 dirtiest and 15 cleanest fruits and vegetables.

The 12 Dirtiest and 15 Cleanest Fruits and Vegetables - Marion Nestle - Health - The Atlantic

If it's not one thing, it's something else!!!

You did notice, I hope, that the links you posted were just bloggers with no more credibility than the poster i challenged. The one governmental link simply said there were few studies. Not to be disagreeable, but just because you read it on the Internet doesn't make it true.
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Old 03-11-2012, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
543 posts, read 1,100,248 times
Reputation: 461
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilson513 View Post
You did notice, I hope, that the links you posted were just bloggers with no more credibility than the poster i challenged. The one governmental link simply said there were few studies. Not to be disagreeable, but just because you read it on the Internet doesn't make it true.
I'll try again here.
Safety of Rooftop / Rain Barrel Collected Water

If you bother to scroll down on this link above, you will see PLENTY of viable credentialed scientists quotes all compiled together. If that isn't enough, then good luck to ya! Sorry to be snippish, but it appears you may have judged too quickly.
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Old 03-11-2012, 06:22 PM
 
Location: the hills of TN!
283 posts, read 862,887 times
Reputation: 305
We have metal roofs, and collect water for household use. Took a sample from the tank to the county for testing, and it came out really clean. We have the rainwater flow directly down the spouts to the underground storage tank (cistern), with a diverter for the first flow of water to help flush off contaminants that collect on the roof and gutters (dust, possible birdy stuff). We also have a water filter attached where the water enters the house for extra cleaning.

We also have rain barrels for the short roof areas for garden use specifically. The downspouts on the rainbarrels also have flush diverters. Many of my neighbors grew up on their farms, and pretty much all have rain water collection cisterns that have been in place for generations. They also have deep wells.
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