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Old 04-01-2012, 07:29 AM
 
470 posts, read 1,084,514 times
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I had a Master Plan done by a landscape architect. He spec'ed some trees that are a little outside my budget. So I wanted to see if there are some inexpensive alternatives out there. I live in atlanta, GA. He spec'ed the following:

"Rising Sun" Eastern Red Bud - 7to8 ft tall
"Green Shadow" Sweetbay magnolia 8 to 9ft tall
"padicans" crytomeria - 8 to 9ft tall
"Aufantiacus" Fragrant tea olive - 6 ft tall
Candian hemlock - 10 to 12 ft height
Nature florida Azalea "orange" 4to 5ft in height
Earthshield winterthur vibournom 5 ft tall
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Old 04-01-2012, 10:39 AM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,497,016 times
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I'm not familiar with the specific cultivars mentioned with the exception of the 'Radicans' cryptomeria (note the correct spelling), although I am familiar with the species.

Suffice it to say, rare cultivars are going to be more expensive than garden varieties or species.
Redbuds are a dime a dozen. Viburnums, tea olive and azaleas are very common. And common generally means cheaper. But again, specific cultivars can be tough, especially in this market as we lost a number of growers and nurseries in recent years.

I'd forget about the hemlock.
If the heat and drought doesn't do it in, woolly adelgid or some other pest eventually will. Not to mention, you wont find those for sale in the area anymore.
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Old 04-01-2012, 11:09 AM
 
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I would ask the architect for alternatives.

Check with local or area nurseries for their recommendations on alternatives. Obviously trees that are stocked locally are the least expensive alternative to ordering specific specimen trees.

Also did you make it known to the LA that you wanted locally stocked trees. Most decent LA's have a working relationships with regional nurseries as well as other landscape material suppliers.
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Old 04-01-2012, 12:41 PM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
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You could also start out with smaller sizes.
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Old 04-01-2012, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,473 posts, read 14,349,745 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blakeas View Post
I had a Master Plan done by a landscape architect. He spec'ed some trees that are a little outside my budget. So I wanted to see if there are some inexpensive alternatives out there. I live in atlanta, GA. He spec'ed the following:

"Rising Sun" Eastern Red Bud - 7to8 ft tall
"Green Shadow" Sweetbay magnolia 8 to 9ft tall
"padicans" crytomeria - 8 to 9ft tall
"Aufantiacus" Fragrant tea olive - 6 ft tall
Candian hemlock - 10 to 12 ft height
Nature florida Azalea "orange" 4to 5ft in height
Earthshield winterthur vibournom 5 ft tall
If you decide to go with these sizes, I can suggest alternatives, but getting a smaller size may be the better way to save.

Rising Sun Redbud - These appear to be one of the most expensive, and they're popular. I looked at a couple online because I really wanted a yellow redbud! But if you don't care, a plain redbud may be cheaper. Or a Forest Pansy redbud. All redbuds produce hot pink blossoms early in Spring and have heart-shaped leaves. Rising Sun is cool because the leaves are yellow (it is rare!) but I think the leaves turn green, anyway. Forest Pansy is equally cool, but more common. Forest Pansy's leaves stay red/purple all year and look like hearts.


"Green Shadow" Sweetbay magnolia - Can't you get a plain Sweetbay magnolia? The straight species enjoys moist soil and full sunlight. It is also called "swamp magnolia" If the landscaper planned to put it in a moist area, perhaps a native betula/birch would be an alternative.

"padicans" (Radicans?) crytomeria - I wanted a cryptomeria once. They're beautiful, but I heard a lot of them are getting cercospora(sp?) blight because of the wet weather. I do see quite a few healthy ones, but ensure it gets good air circulation. This is a fast-growing evergreen that has a soft/fluffy look, and gets pretty tall. Alternatives may be green giant arborvitae. It also grows fast, is evergreen and "fluffily" conical and is more common.

Nature florida Azalea - Are these native Florida flame azaleas? If so, why not get a smaller size. If you want to order these yourself, you can select them from Meadowbrook online or ask the landscaper to use Meadowbrook. Their prices are reasonable, and you can pick up larger sizes at the nursery if you or the landscaper are willing to drive to the nursery to pick them up. 3 gallon listed for pickup at $29 Meadowbrook Nursery: Millie Mac Florida Flame Azalea
The one gallons I bought were about 2 feet tall, excluding the rootball.


Earthshield winterthur viburnom
5 ft tall - Apparently this is a shrub with fragrant flowers that gets to about 6 feet tall. It has tart, edible fruit. Depending on the zone you are in, blueberries may be a great alternative. I bought an aronia melanocarpa (sp?) last year at about 3 feet, and it has grown a lot. I think it was $6 or $12 dollars. These also have edible fruit, and are native. The colors are also pretty. Right now in Spring, it has reddish leaves. My blueberries are looking pretty, as well. Blueberries display awesome orange/red leaves in Fall.


I don't really have any options for the other plants. BTW, why didn't you just call a nursery? They're probably cheaper than a "landscape architect."

It may also be less-expensive to have the architect draw up the plans and get a landscaper or a nursery to prepare the beds and do the planting and hardscaping.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
You could also start out with smaller sizes.
I agree 100%.
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Old 04-02-2012, 06:44 AM
 
470 posts, read 1,084,514 times
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it just didnt get a master plan just for trees - I have a small lot and wasnt sure what to do with the space so they came up with a plan - hardscapes, paths, trees, bushes, deck, etc.

However - I am starting small and since my neighbors are right up on me - i wanted to start with the privacy aspect 1st. So I need those sizes of trees - However, I would like to get alternatives. I appreciate what everyone has given me so far!! Thanks! I paid the LA a fixed fee - so to ask for alternatives would be more money. I can ask different nurseries but I thought I would try here 1st

What about an alternative to Canadian hemlock>
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Old 04-02-2012, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,473 posts, read 14,349,745 times
Reputation: 6451
Quote:
Originally Posted by blakeas View Post
it just didnt get a master plan just for trees - I have a small lot and wasnt sure what to do with the space so they came up with a plan - hardscapes, paths, trees, bushes, deck, etc.

However - I am starting small and since my neighbors are right up on me - i wanted to start with the privacy aspect 1st. So I need those sizes of trees - However, I would like to get alternatives. I appreciate what everyone has given me so far!! Thanks! I paid the LA a fixed fee - so to ask for alternatives would be more money. I can ask different nurseries but I thought I would try here 1st

What about an alternative to Canadian hemlock>
Wow...well I guess if you can afford it...I would think everything else would be costlier than the trees.

As a ballpark, for a 6 foot tree/shrub you should pay about 100 -200 per tree, which includes planting and mulching it.

If you have a small yard and would like an alternative to Canadian Hemlock, why not arborvitae? They're native and common enough that they should be inexpensive. You can get 6-10 footers from a big box store or local nursery for I would say around $50.

Canadian Hemlock - according to about.com "Slow-growing and long-lived, Canadian hemlock trees in the wild may reach 80 feet tall or higher, with a spread of 25' to 30'" If you are looking for a larger tree, you can try again green giant arborvitae, or ilex opaca.

FYI if you are planting an evergreen tree this big, ensure the lot is big enough.

If you do want a shorter, evergreen tree, I'd suggest Nellie Stevens Holly or Techny Arborvitae as alternatives.
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Old 04-02-2012, 05:28 PM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,497,016 times
Reputation: 3518
Quote:
Originally Posted by blakeas View Post
What about an alternative to Canadian hemlock>
If you want that woodsy, mountain evergreen look, I'd consider Deodar cedar. They're very adaptable to the area you're in. Lebanon cedar is another one.

These grow fairly quick once established and provide a good amount of privacy.

Southern magnolia (messy but good privacy)- not to be confused with sweetbay magnolia that's already on your list.

Someone else mentioned nelly r stevens holly. These are a dime a dozen as well. Quick growing and very good privacy screen.

I forgot about Eastern Redcedar. Native, fast growing, nice scent, repells mosquitoes. Pretty inexpensive when you can find them.
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