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Old 04-14-2012, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Great Falls, VA
772 posts, read 1,250,270 times
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There are so many weeds in my back yard, that you can't even walk there, it's like being in the jungle. Its ridiculous. So I went to Lowes and they recommended using Roundup to kill them.

The thing is, I also have four really big pine trees. For the most part, the RU I used didn't touch the green foliage of the Pine trees, just the base of the tree. However, one of the lower branches of the biggest tree was totally trapped under vines. So RU definitely did get on the green foliage of this branch.

Do you think that can kill the pine tree?
I probably should have done more research before using RU, I would be so sad if I kill the big trees.
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Old 04-14-2012, 06:37 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
31,714 posts, read 57,729,725 times
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If you cut off that bench quickly after the Roundup hits it you will be fine. It's a systemic killer, goes through the leaves/needles into the branch and down to the roots. If it's too late, what will likely happen is part of the tree will die, not enough will get all the way down a big tree to kill it normally.
When dormant, the effect will be less on a tree. If it's started to push new growth the roundup will do much more damage.
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Old 04-14-2012, 07:25 PM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,497,016 times
Reputation: 3518
The best way to deal with weeds that are growing near trees or other plants you care about, is to pull them out by hand or to cut/mow them.
Even if you use Roundup and the weeds die, you still have to cut or remove them. The yard isn't going to look any better with a dead "jungle" so you might as well just pull them or mow them in the first place.

Without knowing where these weeds are growing or what kind, all I can say that I believe the best way to deal with weeds is to prevent them from getting there in the first place. You can do this from creating a shady environment, correcting drainage problems, using pre-emergent herbicides, using liberal amounts of mulch (if planting beds), improving the health and density of your lawn (if this is a lawn).
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Old 04-14-2012, 10:33 PM
 
Location: earth?
7,288 posts, read 11,238,915 times
Reputation: 8956
Roundup is evil. You are destroying the natural ecosystem in your yard.
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Old 04-15-2012, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
74,915 posts, read 87,324,236 times
Reputation: 45476
Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
The best way to deal with weeds that are growing near trees or other plants you care about, is to pull them out by hand or to cut/mow them.
Even if you use Roundup and the weeds die, you still have to cut or remove them. The yard isn't going to look any better with a dead "jungle" so you might as well just pull them or mow them in the first place.

Without knowing where these weeds are growing or what kind, all I can say that I believe the best way to deal with weeds is to prevent them from getting there in the first place. You can do this from creating a shady environment, correcting drainage problems, using pre-emergent herbicides, using liberal amounts of mulch (if planting beds), improving the health and density of your lawn (if this is a lawn).
I somewhat agree but it is a lot easier to rid them if you start with a weed killer. wE don't use it on grass, but hubby does on the rocks. As soon as the weeds die he either pullls them or rakes the rocks and everything is wonderful for 3 months or so. He does it twice in the spring and summer. By the time they think they should return it is winter.
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Old 04-15-2012, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
74,915 posts, read 87,324,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imcurious View Post
Roundup is evil. You are destroying the natural ecosystem in your yard.
you are right, but what if we had no such thing as killers for pests, etc. Think about the days prior to the discovery of a chemical to rid the cotton farmers of bull weavels? Most of us try as hard as possible not to depend on poisons of any kind, it isn't always possible, especially if you have a very large yard and/or garden.
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Old 04-15-2012, 08:44 AM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,497,016 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
I somewhat agree but it is a lot easier to rid them if you start with a weed killer. wE don't use it on grass, but hubby does on the rocks. As soon as the weeds die he either pullls them or rakes the rocks and everything is wonderful for 3 months or so. He does it twice in the spring and summer. By the time they think they should return it is winter.
It takes a little more effort to reduce dependency on chemicals.

It also takes time for the herbicide to do its thing. So rather than going out there and removing the weeds right away, you're going to have to look at them for a longer period of time and then you're still going to have to remove them. I guess I just don't have the patience for that.

And third, it's bad enough most homes have lawns, which are the farthest thing from being "green", but to rely on hazardous chemicals for the rest of the landscape, just out of convenience, is not exactly being a good steward of the land. To use them on patio pavers or rocks or something like that, I can understand why someone would use roundup, but there's other ways of dealing with the weeds.
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Old 04-15-2012, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
74,915 posts, read 87,324,236 times
Reputation: 45476
Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
It takes a little more effort to reduce dependency on chemicals.

It also takes time for the herbicide to do its thing. So rather than going out there and removing the weeds right away, you're going to have to look at them for a longer period of time and then you're still going to have to remove them. I guess I just don't have the patience for that.

And third, it's bad enough most homes have lawns, which are the farthest thing from being "green", but to rely on hazardous chemicals for the rest of the landscape, just out of convenience, is not exactly being a good steward of the land. To use them on patio pavers or rocks or something like that, I can understand why someone would use roundup, but there's other ways of dealing with the weeds.
normally I would agree with you and we never used anything until we moved here but, we have a drive way that runs from one street to another that is all rock, we have a driveway on the other side of the lot that runs almost as far and rocks other places. Some areas we do not spray, but the first summer here, hubby dug and dug, daily until the temps got up around 100 degrees with high humidity, it took him the entire summer, as well as facing the crigger problem in the rock. Finally, by the end of the summer he had them under control, only to have them back again within a few weeks. Now, if you wnat to come and weed our rocks or can afford to pay a garderer to do it, we would welcome that, otherwise, remember there is no perfect solution. For us, spraying and then pulling is the only answer. I do keep them out of the rock area by our front porch and hubby keeps them out of the flower beds, but the rest is close to impossible.
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Old 04-15-2012, 04:00 PM
 
588 posts, read 1,241,147 times
Reputation: 594
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
you are right, but what if we had no such thing as killers for pests, etc. Think about the days prior to the discovery of a chemical to rid the cotton farmers of bull weavels? Most of us try as hard as possible not to depend on poisons of any kind, it isn't always possible, especially if you have a very large yard and/or garden.
I try hard to use as few chemicals as possible. I plant flowers and other plants that attract beneficial insects to take care of the bad ones, I use natural "treatments" such as egg shells in the soil of my tomatoes, compost as fertilizer, and manual killing of bad bugs such as grubs, horn worms, gypsy moth catepillars, etc. I use bone meal to feed my bulbs and insecticidal soap if necessary, but harsh chemical use is extremely limited.

HOWEVER... I do apply a pesticide to my yard. Each spring, I apply Spectracide to control ticks. Even though I keep my grass fairly short, ticks are a SERIOUS problem in my area and I am terrified of being bitten by a tick and having a tick-borne illness transimitted to me. Even with the Spectracide, I do find about three ticks per year from my "travels" in my yard, and about a dozen more from walks through my neighborhood. Thankfully, I find all of these ticks long before they bite me, but them even crawling on me or my clothes freaks me out.

I also do use a few other chemicals as needed to control bugs--

1) Deet. I use it on myself, though, not on my yard. I've tried natural bug sprays and picardin, but they just don't keep mosquitos at bay as effectively as deet does.

2) Wasp killer as needed. We have a yellow jacket issue in my neighborhood. If they build their nest far away from my house and I don't have much interaction with them, I leave them be. But if they build a nest next to my front door, or somewhere else that is a hazard to me, I use wasp killer to spray the nest and kill the yellow jackets.
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Old 04-15-2012, 04:12 PM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,497,016 times
Reputation: 3518
@nmnita,

I understand where you're coming from as I maintain a gravel road. To do driveways and patios and things properly, so they don't get weeds is several compacted base layers and some thick fabric. If they aren't done that way, it's a continual maintenance problem.

One trick I've learned that works pretty good for me is early in the season when the weeds are still newly emerged and tender, try driving over them. They've just used all that energy to put out leaves then they get fatally squashed. If they come back, it takes a long time. Then again, if it's 100 degrees already where you live, you may have some pretty heavy duty weeds.
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