U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-22-2012, 10:57 AM
 
588 posts, read 1,240,991 times
Reputation: 594

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
I'll make this short.
Whatever #1 is, I'd remove it and replace with mulch.
Take care of that tree.

Why remove it and replace it with mulch? Lily of the Valley is not going to suck nutrients from a tree. In fact, many, many forests have grown quite successfully with Lily of the Valley growing on the forest floor.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-22-2012, 12:33 PM
 
2,063 posts, read 6,707,289 times
Reputation: 2723
Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
I'll make this short.
Whatever #1 is, I'd remove it and replace with mulch.
Take care of that tree.

Very strange advice to remove something you can't identify. It is Lily of the Valley and the way it was planted the original gardener understood that it was not a good mixed garden plant for other perennials but it does absolutely no harm to trees and provides cover in shady situations where very little else will grow. It is often planted on purpose with azaleas, rhododendron and Hosta as an understory/woodland type setting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2012, 03:05 PM
 
Location: zone 5
7,329 posts, read 13,813,438 times
Reputation: 9648
I love Lily of the Valley. The scent is heavenly. Just know that it will encroach steadily into the lawn. I would be OK with that, but some might not be. And don't decide to transplant a few of them into your flower beds.
As to the half-dead shrub, I'd cut it near to the ground and see what happens. If it doesn't come back, I'd take it out next spring.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2012, 03:47 PM
 
Location: zone 5
7,329 posts, read 13,813,438 times
Reputation: 9648
I just thought of something else about Lily of the Valley. I don't know if you have pets, but the plants will have berries later in the year, and they're toxic. I didn't know this at first, and my dogs weren't interested in them, but that might not be true for all pets.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2012, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
33,076 posts, read 61,908,019 times
Reputation: 55506
Lily of the valley makes a great shade ground cover, which is probably why it was planted under the tree in the first place. It spreads, but it's easily controlled. If it meanders into your lawn, mow it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2012, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Australia
4,004 posts, read 5,455,985 times
Reputation: 6803
Far out lol.

I don't know any of these plants but a weed is only a weed in the eye of the beholder.

I was born in NZ where convulvulus is considered a weed, in Australia you can buy it at the nursery!

If it's pleasing to the eye and doesn't take over, why not leave it?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2012, 04:19 PM
 
Location: The Great State of Arkansas
5,981 posts, read 16,648,812 times
Reputation: 7618
Quote:
Originally Posted by J&Em View Post
Very strange advice to remove something you can't identify. It is Lily of the Valley and the way it was planted the original gardener understood that it was not a good mixed garden plant for other perennials but it does absolutely no harm to trees and provides cover in shady situations where very little else will grow. It is often planted on purpose with azaleas, rhododendron and Hosta as an understory/woodland type setting.
So it's okay with hostas and ferns and won't take them over? I have a traditional southern garden in front - all azaleas, hostas and ferns. It needs a little pep, though, and I was looking at Lily of the Valley. Once I started reading it was a little discouraging, though.

I'm looking for something to fill in the gaps under a huge old oak tree that drops one million acorns every year, meaning I get to pluck one million baby oaks. It gets tiresome....is Lily somewhat drought tolerant? I have one spot that nothing will grow - no rose, not enough sun. No azalea has hung in there, no hydrangea because not enough water. Our sprinkler system was put in when everything was fairly young and does need to be tweaked (if the repairman ever shows). I wanted something taller than ajuga but I'm fairly tanked on hosta.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2012, 09:17 PM
 
2,063 posts, read 6,707,289 times
Reputation: 2723
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam I Am View Post
So it's okay with hostas and ferns and won't take them over? I have a traditional southern garden in front - all azaleas, hostas and ferns. It needs a little pep, though, and I was looking at Lily of the Valley. Once I started reading it was a little discouraging, though.

I'm looking for something to fill in the gaps under a huge old oak tree that drops one million acorns every year, meaning I get to pluck one million baby oaks. It gets tiresome....is Lily somewhat drought tolerant? I have one spot that nothing will grow - no rose, not enough sun. No azalea has hung in there, no hydrangea because not enough water. Our sprinkler system was put in when everything was fairly young and does need to be tweaked (if the repairman ever shows). I wanted something taller than ajuga but I'm fairly tanked on hosta.
Lily of the Valley seems to be more invasive in cooler gardens (3-5, possibly 6) and less of a problem in warmer areas (in zones 7-8). Of course this is not any kind of guarantee -- if you are a gardener you know there are always exceptions. They prefer some moisture but can be quite drought tolerant once established. When first planted they will need a little more tender care with some regular moisture and additional soil amendments to provide a start. Once the first ones are established they will gradually take off and fill in BUT note (for anyone else thinking about using them) that they do not always stay visible for the entire season much like bleeding hearts. This is one the reasons people inter-plant them with Hosta, Ferns, Ajugas and even Astilbe. In my former garden (zone 5) they stayed green throughout the summer and every once in a while would put out some blooms up to early fall. For the most part they were happy to peak out from between the Hosta and Astilbe they were planted with.

Very few things will grow in very dry shade under old trees since the soil is usually quite compacted. You should always try to provide a layer of soil that has been amended properly for any new plantings or they will look just like the current grass or weeds that are just holding on. Many people create a bit of a raised bed area for plantings to compensate, but make sure that the area immediately around the trunk of the tree(s) is left free so it does not become damaged.

If you don't want any Hosta there are several ferns and and even Hellebore which may be work well in the area under your tree. I have walnuts, hazelnuts, as well as oak babies, to yank all the time (courtesy of the neighborhood squirrels and someone who feeds them the nuts) so I can understand how tiresome it could get. You may still get them even with plants thriving beneath the trees.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2012, 03:40 AM
 
Location: The Great State of Arkansas
5,981 posts, read 16,648,812 times
Reputation: 7618
Thanks for the info! Maybe I'll just put out some big ol' grabber huge hostas in lime green or something. This garden has zero interest in the fall and winter, but I can't seem to find an evergreen I'm happy with either, and this is a dense shade area. Hostas do well - sometimes you just gotta work with what you have!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2012, 08:53 AM
 
29,986 posts, read 38,266,689 times
Reputation: 12784
Sam I Am, have you considered planting succulents in the dry area where you say nothing will grow?

Sedum gives nice fall color. 17 Top Sedums

A tree trimming/thining to let in dappled light may also be in order.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top