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Old 04-27-2012, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Lilburn
453 posts, read 1,551,018 times
Reputation: 601

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My wife and I are considering planting a tree in our front yard, its not a big yard and we dont want a big tree. I think a japanese maple maturing to about 20-25ft would be perfect but I worry about the roots damaging underground pipes and sprinklers. What do you think would be a good tree for this area? Here's a pic and the black circle where I would like to put the tree.
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Old 04-27-2012, 07:48 AM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,496,331 times
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Definitely not.

JMs aren't the best adapted to GA, and although it looks like that's the north side of the house, it's still going to bake in the sun. You really would be best planting those in some shade.

You've got room for a bigger tree there. One that would truly add value to the property once it matured.
Maybe something along the lines of a pepperidge/ blackgum , sourwood, lacebark elm or magnolia just to name a few.

As for damaging pipes. Tree roots only exploit pipes that are already broken or leaking. Trees are smart but they aren't that smart. They don't feel around for pipes with their roots and go "Oh here's a water main. I think I'll tap into this"

Whatever you decide to plant, don't plant it as deep as that maple next to the water meter and it's good idea to keep mulch 6 inches from the trunk.

Just as a side note, you might want to get with the HOA or whoever owns that land behind the house about those large dead trees.
I can't tell how far away they are but I wouldn't want them coming down on the house, swingsets, fences, stuff in the yard etc.

Last edited by cittic10; 04-27-2012 at 08:06 AM..
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Old 04-27-2012, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Lilburn
453 posts, read 1,551,018 times
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Thanks for the suggestions Cittic but the blackgum, elm and magnolia are too big for what we want-we want ornamental trees. Nothing thats going to overpower the house and block what little sunshine the existing plants get-this is the northside of the house. Funny what you say about the japanese maple because we planted two in the back and they get full sun all day and are doing very well. Now that sourwood does look nice-I will add that to the list. As for the pipes, I know some tree roots are intrusive and can damage smaller pipes(sprinkler) but I think a smaller tree should be ok.

The dead tree behind the house is actually behind my neighbors property, I told him to contact the HOA and have that taken care of. Oh and I didn't know that about the mulch-why is that?
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Old 04-27-2012, 11:26 AM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,496,331 times
Reputation: 3518
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAB6120 View Post
Nothing thats going to overpower the house and block what little sunshine the existing plants get-this is the northside of the house.
Have you lived in GA long? Shade is in very valuable. It's silly to pass up the benefits of a shade tree just so that some shrubs and foundation plants can thrive. Not that they wouldn't thrive. I didn't suggest anything that would "overpower the house", which unfortunately is a common but really silly reason not to plant a tree.


Quote:
Originally Posted by LAB6120 View Post
Funny what you say about the japanese maple because we planted two in the back and they get full sun all day and are doing very well.
Trees that aren't well adapted can appear to be doing very well, especially now in the springtime but come summer they start to suffer. Many trees will look ok on the surface but won't be able to ward off pests or disease as well and they may one day just die suddenly.

Take a look around. How many mature JMs do you see???

Quote:
Originally Posted by LAB6120 View Post
As for the pipes, I know some tree roots are intrusive and can damage smaller pipes(sprinkler)
If your irrigation system is leaking, it can attract roots which may grow towards it.

Just to clarify though... we are talking about Georgia, United States, yes?
Is that or is that not a bermudagrass lawn which requires no irrigation except during times of drought, at which times we are normally prohibited from watering lawns anyway?

I see nothing else there that requires irrigation.


Quote:
Originally Posted by LAB6120 View Post
Oh and I didn't know that about the mulch-why is that?
Mulch against the tree invites pests such as insects like the kind that attack stressed JMs and rodents that may damage the trees by gnawing on the trunk and also traps moisture against the trunk creating the ideal environment for fungi and rot.
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Old 04-27-2012, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,473 posts, read 14,348,153 times
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Redbud (cercis canadensis) - There are a lot of pretty cultivars. One of my favorite ornamental trees. The hot pink flowers are FAbOO in Spring, and the leaves are shaped like hearts.

Magnolia - I don't know a lot about these, but there are cultivars which are small, and they're pretty (imo) all year. I see a lot of really pretty smaller varieties. Perhaps someone can suggest the names.

Serviceberry - pretty flowers and edible fruit. Lovely Autumn foliage. There are various cultivars.
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Old 04-27-2012, 12:54 PM
 
25,627 posts, read 31,472,339 times
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See those two Crepe Myrtles on the side of your front window.

Transplant one of them there and I would move the other one also.

Or you could plant a new tree and move those to the back.

Here pick one. 20ft+ cultivars at the bottom.

Crape Myrtle Culture | CAES Publications | UGA

That maple might be just fine. Check to make sure the root collar of the tree is not below ground and definately get the bark at least 3-6 inches away from the trunk. If the collar is below the dirt line you might want to think about lowering the dirt level. I assume you have a mound of dirt behind those wall stones not just a foot of bark.

Last edited by Bulldogdad; 04-27-2012 at 01:05 PM..
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Old 04-27-2012, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Lilburn
453 posts, read 1,551,018 times
Reputation: 601
Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
Have you lived in GA long? Shade is in very valuable. It's silly to pass up the benefits of a shade tree just so that some shrubs and foundation plants can thrive. Not that they wouldn't thrive. I didn't suggest anything that would "overpower the house", which unfortunately is a common but really silly reason not to plant a tree.
I have been here 6 years and I know its hot-I like hot-I dont want a tree towering over the roof of the house.


Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
Trees that aren't well adapted can appear to be doing very well, especially now in the springtime but come summer they start to suffer. Many trees will look ok on the surface but won't be able to ward off pests or disease as well and they may one day just die suddenly.

Take a look around. How many mature JMs do you see???
I have had these JM since 2007. They are doing well



Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
Just to clarify though... we are talking about Georgia, United States, yes?
Is that or is that not a bermudagrass lawn which requires no irrigation except during times of drought, at which times we are normally prohibited from watering lawns anyway?

I see nothing else there that requires irrigation.
I have a hill full of plants in the back and we were in drought conditions the past couple of summers and here in Gwinnett county were allowed to water on odd/even days



Quote:
Originally Posted by cittic10 View Post
Mulch against the tree invites pests such as insects like the kind that attack stressed JMs and rodents that may damage the trees by gnawing on the trunk and also traps moisture against the trunk creating the ideal environment for fungi and rot.
good to know, I will move the mulch back
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Old 04-27-2012, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Lilburn
453 posts, read 1,551,018 times
Reputation: 601
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldogdad View Post
See those two Crepe Myrtles on the side of your front window.

Transplant one of them there and I would move the other one also.

Or you could plant a new tree and move those to the back.

Here pick one. 20ft+ cultivars at the bottom.

Crape Myrtle Culture | CAES Publications | UGA

That maple might be just fine. Check to make sure the root collar of the tree is not below ground and definately get the bark at least 3-6 inches away from the trunk. If the collar is below the dirt line you might want to think about lowering the dirt level. I assume you have a mound of dirt behind those wall stones not just a foot of bark.
I was thinking of maybe putting another Crepe there-Is there a reason I should move the ones by the window?
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Old 04-27-2012, 02:10 PM
 
25,627 posts, read 31,472,339 times
Reputation: 23139
Quote:
Originally Posted by LAB6120 View Post
I was thinking of maybe putting another Crepe there-Is there a reason I should move the ones by the window?
Biggest reason is they look awkward and they really wont ever be able to reach there full potential right up against the house. I'm not real happy about the placement of those purple bushes/trees right in front of those beautiful bay windows. It's all rather akward IMO.

Landscaping should always enhance the architecture of the house not detract from it.
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Old 04-27-2012, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Lilburn
453 posts, read 1,551,018 times
Reputation: 601
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldogdad View Post
Biggest reason is they look awkward and they really wont ever be able to reach there full potential right up against the house. I'm not real happy about the placement of those purple bushes/trees right in front of those beautiful bay windows. It's all rather akward IMO.

Landscaping should always enhance the architecture of the house not detract from it.
Ok, I forgot what species of crepe these are but they don't get much taller than what you see. The purple bushes are lorepetulum shrubs-I just shaped them to look like small trees. When I purchased the house all it had was some low growing junipers-I think this looks much better. Dont know about enhancing the architecture but I like my current plants.
Edit:by the way folks, I can take the criticism but I am not a professional landscaper and everything you see, I planted- I am just trying to make the yard look good on a limited budget.
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