U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 09-20-2007, 10:35 AM
 
Location: USA East Coast
4,445 posts, read 9,877,143 times
Reputation: 2151

Advertisements

Just thought I would post a few photos of my small tropical garden in coastal Connecticut near Long Island Sound. I’m in zone 7 along the southeast Connecticut coast. In my travels throughout the Mid-Atlantic States – I have seen some palms, bamboo, and bananas growing a few times. I have seen several taller windmill palms growing in coastal New Jersey and Delaware, and hardy bananas in sheltered areas in Maryland (Ocean City) and Long Island, NY. I always wanted to try it.

As everyone knows, the climate of East Asia (Japan, East-central China, South Korea) is pretty similar in climate to the Atlantic states from North Carolina to Connecticut. Long hot, humid summers with high rainfall, and moderate winters with below freezing temperatures, but not sub-zero cold like the Mid-West or Upstate New York/ New England.

The bamboo of course is the most hardy, and will even grow in zone 5 – but may never get large due to winter die-off and clums breaking from heavy snow loads. I have seen bamboo in Michigan, Massachusetts, and northern Ohio, but it never gets large (on average) because of the heavy snow in northern areas away form the coast. The Bananas and palms, of course, seem more fragile. I think zone 7/6b is the limit for growing a palm, so I hope mine will survive. The Bananas seem to overwinter fine as long as I mulch them after I cut them down after the first hard frost around early November.

Just thought I would show what is possible in Zone 7 without too much trouble. My yard looks more like it's in South China than in the United States (lol).
Attached Thumbnails
Tropical Garden in northern Zone 7-1.jpg   Tropical Garden in northern Zone 7-2.jpg   Tropical Garden in northern Zone 7-3.jpg   Tropical Garden in northern Zone 7-4.jpg   Tropical Garden in northern Zone 7-5.jpg  

Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-15-2007, 06:52 PM
 
2,653 posts, read 8,794,846 times
Reputation: 1245
Just want to comment that you're garden looks great! Nice job. Looks like a little extra work, but I'm sure if you love gardening, you probably don't mind.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-16-2007, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Southeastern North Carolina
2,690 posts, read 4,015,374 times
Reputation: 4776
I remember seeing a house on Huron Ave., in Cambridge, Mass.(zone6), that had bamboo growing in the front yard, and it was green all though the winter. That interested me when I lived in Boston, 'cause anything that was evergreen there was a blessing in the winter. I considered planting it in my own yard, but read that was invasive so I never did.

Down here in coastal NC (zone 8) there are palm trees, also banana trees but I think they may need protection from the cold, it does go below freezing some nights.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-16-2007, 02:33 PM
 
13,428 posts, read 19,811,706 times
Reputation: 7441
Bamboo grows easily in a lot of frigid climates. You are correct to avoid it as it can become a serious menace.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-17-2007, 05:56 AM
 
Location: Tolland County- Northeastern CT
4,462 posts, read 7,397,601 times
Reputation: 1237
My two windmill palms in Connecticut are still uncovered, and look strong and robust in the sub freezing weather over night. It looks as if the weather will moderate toward the holiday (54 by day 33 overnight) So I may not have to cover till late November or early December.

These two palms survived last winter, and grew very strongly over the summer.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-17-2007, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Mesa, Az
21,144 posts, read 40,501,627 times
Reputation: 3852
Trachycarpus Fortunei are tough buggers
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-18-2007, 12:51 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,297 posts, read 7,907,683 times
Reputation: 3804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
Bamboo grows easily in a lot of frigid climates. You are correct to avoid it as it can become a serious menace.
I planted clumping bamboo (Chusquea family) in my front yard about 4 years ago in Portland. It's about 15 ft. tall and only about 4' wide. It is not invasive like other types. I know other gardeners who have used underground barriers for some of the invasive types.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2008, 01:25 PM
 
5 posts, read 31,573 times
Reputation: 14
wavehunter, could you tell me what kind of bamboo that is? -thanks
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2023, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top