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Old 03-06-2015, 04:37 PM
 
Location: San Diego
38,110 posts, read 34,121,965 times
Reputation: 22293

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Quote:
Originally Posted by forestlover View Post
Here's an article about how predators, including crows, are tricked into not eating certain animals like baby birds or domestic farm birds' eggs.

http://www.great-group-activities.co...-control.html/

Crows are territorial and teach their young, so once "trained" they inadvertently scare away other predators that would eat the animals because they're just protecting their territory. Plus, they tend to teach their young which animals to avoid. The article starts out telling how this was done with coyotes and other larger predators, but also discusses predator birds including crows. The process doesn't seem simple. But once done, it appears it can create years of peace for homeowners, farmers and ranchers. The process might not be allowed legally in some locations.
That sounds good in theory but realistically, for Crows, they cover too much ground each day. Once they get their mob built out they all know each other and any 'electric dead baby bird' might only teach a few. Crows can be pretty vicious on song birds by ripping out nests and eating the eggs and young. We use an airsoft bb gun. It's legal and can sting them enough to beat it.


Plus, great entertainment for the kids



Real guns are the only permanent cure for these black devils. The song birds worst nightmare.
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Old 03-06-2015, 04:50 PM
 
Location: North West Arkansas (zone 6b)
2,741 posts, read 2,217,284 times
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here's an interesting story about a girl who gets presents from crows that she feeds. I found it fascinating.

BBC News - The girl who gets gifts from birds
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Old 03-06-2015, 04:50 PM
 
716 posts, read 980,401 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1AngryTaxPayer View Post
That sounds good in theory but realistically, for Crows, they cover too much ground each day. Once they get their mob built out they all know each other and any 'electric dead baby bird' might only teach a few. Crows can be pretty vicious on song birds by ripping out nests and eating the eggs and young. We use an airsoft bb gun. It's legal and can sting them enough to beat it.


Plus, great entertainment for the kids



Real guns are the only permanent cure for these black devils. The song birds worst nightmare.
Crows are very intelligent animals. Native Americans held them in high regard. I don't understand holding song birds are put on such a pedestal that people will actively try to destroy anything that might "interfere" with them. I have even seen where people hired out hunters to shoot the birds in their area that they didn't approve of.

Sorry song birds around my house...I don't think you are that special. No more birdseed for you!
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Old 03-06-2015, 06:20 PM
 
1,242 posts, read 1,322,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andthentherewere3 View Post
I had to blink a couple of times, at first I thought the title read, "Cows preying on baby birds".
Interesting you mention that. I just read an article about how deer and cows will go out of thier way to eat birds.
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Old 03-06-2015, 07:12 PM
 
1,681 posts, read 3,157,328 times
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Crows are like the hyenas of the bird world. They're ugly, obnoxious, and they harass other animals to keep them away or take their food.

Look at these two brave (stupid) crows harassing a bald eagle while it eats. Eagles, hawks, and owls are predators of crows.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TlPOaQa_vzk
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Old 03-06-2015, 08:21 PM
 
1,059 posts, read 826,017 times
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Rose bushes are a nice place for cardinals nests. Crows are too big to find a way in.
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Old 06-29-2016, 11:46 AM
 
1 posts, read 889 times
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Default Crows grrrr

Hi - I just ran across this site and this thread in particular, because I googled "Do crows eat baby birds." Yes, apparently they do.

This spring, a pretty mama Robin (I call her Mrs. Robin) built a lovely nest in the upper corner of my porch, and she laid her eggs. I watched her sit on that nest, coming and going, and was looking forward to seeing her tend her babies. Well, that wasn't to happen. Where I sit at my computer, I can see that nest through the window. for the last couple of days, I've watched the mama and papa feeding those babies and marveled at how the babies stick their heads up with their little mouths open even when the parents are not there.

Today I've not seen the babies' heads. A couple of minutes ago, I saw a crow land on the porch railing, and he looked very pleased with himself. I jumped up and ran out the front door and scared him away. He sat on the telephone wire across the street until he decided I wasn't leaving, then he flew away. Well, after a few minutes, I glanced back out and saw one of the babies with his head up and mouth open. He didn't stay that was long, but ducked back down into the nest.

I understand about nature and the order of things, but I just can't stand the thought of those crows eating those little naked babies right in their nest.

I'm not asking for advice or anything, just voicing an opinion. My loyalty is with the robins. Mrs. Robin and Mr. Robin have worked so hard bringing worms and fat bug things to feed their young'uns, and I can't stand the thought of her losing another set of eggs/babies so soon after the first. If the crows ate all the babies, there would soon be no more robins.

Those are my thoughts on the matter. :-)
Carol
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Old 06-29-2016, 12:27 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
31,712 posts, read 57,708,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carolcarp View Post
Hi - I just ran across this site and this thread in particular, because I googled "Do crows eat baby birds." Yes, apparently they do.

This spring, a pretty mama Robin (I call her Mrs. Robin) built a lovely nest in the upper corner of my porch, and she laid her eggs. I watched her sit on that nest, coming and going, and was looking forward to seeing her tend her babies. Well, that wasn't to happen. Where I sit at my computer, I can see that nest through the window. for the last couple of days, I've watched the mama and papa feeding those babies and marveled at how the babies stick their heads up with their little mouths open even when the parents are not there.

Today I've not seen the babies' heads. A couple of minutes ago, I saw a crow land on the porch railing, and he looked very pleased with himself. I jumped up and ran out the front door and scared him away. He sat on the telephone wire across the street until he decided I wasn't leaving, then he flew away. Well, after a few minutes, I glanced back out and saw one of the babies with his head up and mouth open. He didn't stay that was long, but ducked back down into the nest.

I understand about nature and the order of things, but I just can't stand the thought of those crows eating those little naked babies right in their nest.

I'm not asking for advice or anything, just voicing an opinion. My loyalty is with the robins. Mrs. Robin and Mr. Robin have worked so hard bringing worms and fat bug things to feed their young'uns, and I can't stand the thought of her losing another set of eggs/babies so soon after the first. If the crows ate all the babies, there would soon be no more robins.

Those are my thoughts on the matter. :-)
Carol
We have also had several nest with baby birds eaten by crows, mostly Junkos. We have cottontails in the area too, and often have adults and babies on our lawns. Once in a while we will see the remains of a young on after some coyote has feasted on it during the night. A few years ago my wife told me she had seen a Great Blue Heron on the backyard fence, an unusual sight. I went out and discovered that many of my 5-6" goldfish in the pond were missing. I agree with you completely, but it is nature, and there is really not much that can be done about it. My stepfather is in a rural area where you can shoot on your land, and he knocked off a crow, then hung it from a tree where the others would see it. After an afternoon of loud flying around by his pals, they left and have stayed away for over a year. One trick you could do if you find another active nest is to build a cage around it while the mother is away. Just make the opening large enough for the robins to get in and out, but not a crow, and have the opening far enough away that a crow can't reach the eggs or babies with his beak. There is the risk of the robins abandoning it, though so you have to keep an eye on it and make sure they figure out how to get in, and if not, remove it. Sort of based on the idea of the cage feeder that protects small birds from predators when feeding:

https://www.atgstores.com/bird-feede...160629182613:s
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Old 06-29-2016, 06:48 PM
 
4,581 posts, read 5,833,096 times
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Of course, predation is part of the natural order. But one thing to think about is that crows have done much better living with human communities than many other birds. They thrive on our garbage, and are able to recognize french fry bags, etc. So they have an advantage over many song birds because crows are omnivorous (eat basically anything) and are highly adaptive in human settings. So since there is more food, we see a lot more crows in our towns and cities than we would out in the wild. Since there are a lot of them, they will need lots of food, and will consume what is natural, which includes baby birds. Keep in mind that the song birds that are in more rural and wilderness areas may suffer less predation by crows than those that live in the city. Of course, there are other predators in the wild - the world is dangerous for helpless baby birds. It is definitely sad to see this, but we just have to accept it.
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Old 06-29-2016, 09:22 PM
 
3,479 posts, read 2,601,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
About forty years ago I shot one crow from a concealed (camouflaged) location. The remaining crows went nuts. They did not like the idea that they did not see it coming. I think that they pride themselves on recognizing trouble. They cawed furiously for over an hour.

I also think they can tell whether or not we have guns or garden rakes in our hands. After the one crow met his demise, crows around my house remembered me for many years (maybe twenty to thirty years or longer). They had to pass the information on to other crows. Crows had totally different reactions to me and my wife. My wife did not bother them and they would continue to eat. If they spotted me; they moved away.

It is only the last few years that this crow 'learning' experience seems to have forgiven or forgotten.
Fascinating!
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