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Old 01-08-2013, 12:27 PM
 
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Ok, folks, I need suggestion.
I want to cover one side of my fence with green hedge of a kind, to NOT see neighbor's property there. Mobile homes.
It's a long strip, about 200 feet, fenced with chain link fence.
To make things worse, I have tall trees growing along same side, that suck all nutrients out of soil.
So far, I tried vines, they died, and any shrubs I set there did not grow either.
My wife says, nothing will grow, because of the trees. Of course, pest shrubs do fine, but they are not tall and dense enough to create green hedge.
Using laurels or other common green hedge shrubs is cost prohibitive and takes long time to grow dense.
We keep that area as, basically, clippings dumping zone.
What I am looking for is something that will grow FAST, dense, and will catch. Mof, soil is quite nice, as it's all fluffed by tree roots. Plenty of moisture, it's Pacific NW.

Any suggestions? I know there are some wild shrubs that grow in matter of year or 2 into dense wall, just don't know which ones. Oh, yes, did I mention - I am cheap?

Thank you.
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Old 01-08-2013, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Little Rock AR USA
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One problem that keeps things from growing there may be the tree roots. You didn't write what the trees are, but some puts out a toxic chemical to prevent other plants from growing and crowding them. Also, I have found that any shrub/plant that grows fast, often becomes invasive or short lived. Good luck. Looks like you need it.
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Old 01-08-2013, 04:13 PM
 
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Tall pines. No, no toxins, like I said - junk green grows fine. It's lay strip anyway, sort of where we stick rocks and clippings, about 200 by 7 feet. I don't care about hedge looks, just need dense and taller than 6 feet.
I considered using those green strips you can stick into the fence links, but it's cost prohibitive for the length, and you can still see through. Also, they will know, that I am covering fence not to see them. With live hedge, it's "natural".
Pisses me off, neighbor 500 feet or so down arterial has entire RV park solid in vine green hedge. SOLID. Soooo envious.
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Old 01-08-2013, 04:23 PM
 
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Hazelnuts (filberts) are perfect for your area. They can be copice managed as well. They are however, deciduous.
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Old 01-08-2013, 05:07 PM
 
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Thank you. Need something staying green and solid. Squirrel would have been happy though.
Come to think, I have 2 hazelnuts growing in front of that strip (well attended by the above mentioned lady). They are too spread, not dense enough.
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Old 01-08-2013, 09:05 PM
 
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Knowing where you are would help with suggestions because it would help determine moisture, winter temperatures and other conditions that limit what grows. What works for me won't work for someone in Maine or North Dakota or Florida. Right now it sounds like hollies (Nellie R Stevens and American Holly come to mind), a few yew varieties (especially Taxus X media ‘Hatfieldii’) and rosebay rhododendron (Rhododendron maximum) and a cherry relative called Portugal laurel (Prunus lusitanica) might work for you. If you want to narrow your search try a Google search looking for "understory shrubs and trees" in your area (USDA zone or your region), then look for those that are evergreen and you may come up with a few more. Some people have compiled native plant lists for their state and that can be another source for shrubs that will grow without too much extra care. I hope that gets you started on your green screen.
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Old 01-08-2013, 10:00 PM
 
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I guess I did say - Pacific NW, North West.

But looking at laurel (and I have very well doing ornamental short hedge of it, about 60 feet long) brought me to this:

Most hedges are best maintained at 8-10 feet tall. This is the height that most people can easily and safely maintain their hedges and still get the desired screening. When shearing, remember to prune so the top is narrower than the base. This is to insure that all parts of the hedge receive sunlight. Otherwise the bottom becomes shaded and bare. For a healthy, manageable hedge, you should plan on a regular maintenance program of annual or even bi-annual shearing.
The following evergreen shrubs are amenable to shearing and thus make good 8-10 foot tall hedges:
Glossy Abelia: glossy green leaves flowers
Escallonia: glossy dark green leaves, pink flowers
Canadian Hemlock: lovely narrow needled hedge, susceptible to root rot
Chinese Holly: glossy almost rectangular leaves, red berries
Japanese Holly: looks like boxwood, narrow green leaves, and black berries
Columnar Juniper: various varieties, blue green foliage, can get mites and root rot
Portugal Laurel: better than English, slower growing, darker leaf, white flowers
Osmanthus: leathery attractive foliage, small white but fragrant flowers
Japanese Privet: green oval leaves, white flowers widely used
Yew: various varieties, tolerates shade, susceptible to root rot


This should give me some search starter
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Old 01-08-2013, 10:07 PM
 
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Which out of all, I had privet in mind for quite a while, as I like its density. Laurel I know grows real well here.
Look at this pic. See, in the mid right section of it, fence with the house? THat's part of the area I am trying to cover.
Laurels is short hedge in the center, plenty of whatever the background is (some sort of cypress, I believe. Pain to trim continuously)

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Old 01-09-2013, 10:30 AM
 
Location: WA
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I've used Leyland Cypress with good results.
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Old 01-09-2013, 11:21 AM
 
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yes, that's what my outside hedge is out of. They kinda pricy and slow growing. Wish I could find something that grows like on yest.
I watched one of them garden shows several years ago, and guy showed some wild shrubs, that grow 6-8 feet in one year, don't care about what they are growing on, and create not pretty, but thick privacy fence. They are considered a pest, but for areas where beauty is not concern, but time of growth is, they should work. Wish I had their name written down. He showed several kinds, that do same.
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