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Old 02-17-2013, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,472 posts, read 14,708,836 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by selhars View Post
QVC just had a gardening/outdoor living day...
I couldn't help it!...I bought:

- a set of 10 sun patiens (all kinds of various colors/annual)
- a set of 4 WINTER HARDY perennial snapdragons (yellow, pink, white)
- a set of 3 ice plants (blooming evergreens perennial --pink and red)
- a set of 8 hens and chick (perennial/red, pink, blue)
WOW there are perennial snapdragons?!! I'd better go see if I can get some for zone 7.
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Old 02-17-2013, 11:39 AM
 
7,957 posts, read 8,399,816 times
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RE: perennial snapdragons....

Yes. Obviously I don't have the ones I just bought yet -- BUT I gave a friend some snapdragon seeds (I don't even remember from where, Walmart or a nursery) that she planted SEASONS ago, and sure enough she tells me they come back every year. (She's in northern VA, Zone 7, too)

As for my other purchases...
This is the first time I've bought anything from Roberta's or Cottage Farms -- and of course I won't even get them until April. They don't ship until is time to plant in your zone. All their annuals are guaranteed for the season and perennials for a year.

I'm super excited....AND of course I'll STILL be going to my local nurseries. You didn't think this purchase means no nurseries trips, did you? Can't wait for that either. (And I technically don't even have room for all this.)

The sets I bought will be split among family....

That's the one thing I always hesitated about with QVC and Roberta's and Cottage Farms, their sets are so big. 4,6,8 plants -- or more....who needs all that. I wish they had a per plant option. I'd have bought a lot more before now.

I really only need ONE of each. That's why the local nursery is so good for me I can buy only ONE of anything I want.
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Old 02-18-2013, 08:37 PM
 
9,428 posts, read 11,682,980 times
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Well I've ordered a cute sack for growing potatoes. I'm going to experiment with that and my raised bed, see which does better. Tomatoes have sprouted on the kitchen window sill and looking good. I think the dill seeds I had were goners, they weren't doing a thing, so I bought some more today. Will see how those do.
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Old 02-19-2013, 12:19 AM
 
7,957 posts, read 8,399,816 times
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QVC had this 8-piece tomato plant set I was thinking of getting (they're sold out now so I likely missed them but who knows.)
I hesitated....1) because of the price....and 2) tomato plants/seeds are soooo available, didn't really think it was necessary.

"eight-piece chef's choice heirloom tomato garden from Cottage Farms.....two of each of the following four varieties:
-- Sunset's Red Horizon, a red, sweet, heart-shaped tomato native to Russia
-- Principe Borghese, a red, plum-shaped, Italian heirloom tomato with very few seeds
-- Abraham Lincoln, a meaty and dark red tomato
-- Pink Oxheart, a glossy pink, meaty tomato that dates from 1925."

Now, granted THESE may not be at the local garden center.....
Anyone had these?
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Old 02-19-2013, 10:13 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,472 posts, read 14,708,836 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by selhars View Post
QVC had this 8-piece tomato plant set I was thinking of getting (they're sold out now so I likely missed them but who knows.)
I hesitated....1) because of the price....and 2) tomato plants/seeds are soooo available, didn't really think it was necessary.

"eight-piece chef's choice heirloom tomato garden from Cottage Farms.....two of each of the following four varieties:
-- Sunset's Red Horizon, a red, sweet, heart-shaped tomato native to Russia
-- Principe Borghese, a red, plum-shaped, Italian heirloom tomato with very few seeds
-- Abraham Lincoln, a meaty and dark red tomato
-- Pink Oxheart, a glossy pink, meaty tomato that dates from 1925."

Now, granted THESE may not be at the local garden center.....
Anyone had these?
Sadly, I haven't but hey sound delish.
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Old 02-20-2013, 05:10 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
77,610 posts, read 90,183,444 times
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Yes, the fever has started and I put 2 sweet potatoes in jars yesterday. They will have plenty of time to sprout their roots before they go into the ground. Now, the fever is going out a little, just temporarily; tonight we are due for some wintery weather, including a possible ice storm. We haven't had one in over 4 years...I don't think it will be anything like the last one, but even a little one takes the wind out of the gardening sails...
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Old 02-20-2013, 08:25 AM
 
11,223 posts, read 9,413,328 times
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My garden plans were radically changed night before last, when an 80 year old conifer came crashing down during a windstorm, taking branches of nearby shrubs and a sour cherry tree down with it. The tree service we called arrive promptly and got it cut into manageable pieces and hauled away (except for five trunk sections I had them leave for garden seating), but I have a big gap in the row of conifers near my back property line (bad), much less privacy (bad), damaged shrubs, some of which were cut back farther due to damage (mostly bad), and more light (good). We plan to replace this tree with as large a tree of the same kind as possible, as soon as possible, but realize that we'll never personally enjoy another 80 year old tree in that place, sadly...

Our backyard was last professionally landscaped in the late 1940s, and originally included two large deciduous trees which were part of a fence row on the historic estate from which the neighborhood was carved in the 1930s. One of those giant trees remains, about halfway back the backyard and we intend to keep it. Our soil is alkaline and rich, but contains some clay and can become dry in the summer. Obviously the yard is considerably less shady than it was 48 hours ago! There are two neglected perennial beds (on either side of the back part of the yard) which we plan to have cleared of overgrowth (mostly ivy and periwinkle - both of which are going to be a bear to dig out without disturbing the more desirable flowers) and partially replanted when spring arrives, salvaging the surviving bulbs and perennials. With the loss of the big nearby tree, both beds will receive more sunlight.

So - we have rhododendroms beneath the row of conifers near the back property, a couple of dogwoods in the same vicinity, blue spruces in the corners (also very tall now), the big deciduous tree about halfway back, surrounded by an overgrown ivy bed which is mostly periwinkle now, a companion ivy/periwinkle bed across from the big tree bed, honeysuckle hedge along one side of the back part of the yard (the corresponding hedge was cut down during a misunderstanding concerning a neighbor's new fence along the other side property line - it's growing back very slowly), and some overgrown bushes of various kinds - invasive bush honeysuckle, blazing bush, azaleas - nearer the house on the same side as the "trimmed" hedge. There are also two tall evergreens just behind the overgrown bushes. The opposite side is okay - garage, edged by viburnum and a flowerbed in fair shape.

So - what shrubs would you recommend to replace or supplement these overgrown, damaged, not first-choice-but-mature-and-providing-privacy current things? We value our privacy, and the yard has a woodland feel, with the mature trees and surrounding greenery, accented by shade loving flowers here and there. The yard is at the bottom of a gentle slope and is level, with a southern exposure. The grass also needs some work and replanting, but that's an easy fix by comparison with the other issues.

Shrubs and small trees we're considering include redbud, spirea, flowering quince, fringe tree (hard to find, native, used to have one and loved it), hydrangeas, spicebush (native but likes a lot of water), and azaleas and rhododendrons, which require more acid soil to do their best (most of ours are planted beneath those conifers, which compensates for our alkaline soil). Using native plants would be nice, if nursery grown specimens can be found.

We enjoy sitting out in the back yard and occasional outdoor entertaining during pleasant weather, but do not want to create a patio or other paved area. We do have paths with mulch and stepping stones here and there which blend nicely with the woodland garden look.

Suggestions and ideas are most welcome - our spring gardening plans have just been changed radically by Mother Nature!

(Edited to add that our property is in central Kentucky.)
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Old 02-20-2013, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,472 posts, read 14,708,836 times
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For alkaline soil with a combo of shade and sun, I'd second the redbud. Redbud trees are fine in somewhat alkaline soil and I think they are so beautiful in spring. The heart-shaped leaves are lovely all year round.

Redbud seems like such an inadequate name for such a lovely tree. There are cultivars which have interestingly colored leaves all year round in addition to the pretty leaf color such as Hearts of Gold and Forest Pansy. I have a straight cercis canadenis. It has grown pretty quickly in my alkaline (yep I tested the soil) field near white pines.

BTW I am so JEALOUS of your invasive bush honeysuckle. I wish you could send me some! I am trying to repair a wooded area with a very alkaline and mostly barren dry, shady slope. I'm actually planning to BUY bush honeysuckle this year.
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Old 02-20-2013, 05:55 PM
 
11,223 posts, read 9,413,328 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
For alkaline soil with a combo of shade and sun, I'd second the redbud. Redbud trees are fine in somewhat alkaline soil and I think they are so beautiful in spring. The heart-shaped leaves are lovely all year round.

Redbud seems like such an inadequate name for such a lovely tree. There are cultivars which have interestingly colored leaves all year round in addition to the pretty leaf color such as Hearts of Gold and Forest Pansy. I have a straight cercis canadenis. It has grown pretty quickly in my alkaline (yep I tested the soil) field near white pines.

BTW I am so JEALOUS of your invasive bush honeysuckle. I wish you could send me some! I am trying to repair a wooded area with a very alkaline and mostly barren dry, shady slope. I'm actually planning to BUY bush honeysuckle this year.

Thanks for the support for redbud - it is one of my favorites, too. It's always so good to see that early spring brilliant color.

Please do some additional research prior to planting bush honeysuckle - it's not native to the U.S. and will crowd out everything else! It's a major problem in wooded areas here in central Kentucky - it sprouts additional branches if you cut it back, hydra-like, and its fruit is not especially nutritious for birds and animals. About the only way to permanently erradicate short of uprooting it it is to cut it back to the ground and apply herbicide to the stump.

Redbud is much, much better!
How about trying red cedars instead? They like dry, poor, alkaline soil - about the only evergreen which does like such conditions, in fact.
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Old 02-20-2013, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,472 posts, read 14,708,836 times
Reputation: 6464
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
Thanks for the support for redbud - it is one of my favorites, too. It's always so good to see that early spring brilliant color.

Please do some additional research prior to planting bush honeysuckle - it's not native to the U.S. and will crowd out everything else! It's a major problem in wooded areas here in central Kentucky - it sprouts additional branches if you cut it back, hydra-like, and its fruit is not especially nutritious for birds and animals. About the only way to permanently erradicate short of uprooting it it is to cut it back to the ground and apply herbicide to the stump.

Redbud is much, much better!
How about trying red cedars instead? They like dry, poor, alkaline soil - about the only evergreen which does like such conditions, in fact.
I think we may be talking about different plants. I'm considering diervilla lonicera (northern bush honeysuckle) and diervilla sessilifolia (southern bush honeysuckle)

Northern Bush-honeysuckle (Diervilla lonicera)

According to the sources I've read, these are natives.

I did get rid of an "amur honeysuckle"...as usual I had no idea what it was until I looked it up. I cut it way down and cut the sprouts, and it seems to be dead. I didn't have to use any herbicides.
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