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Old 03-12-2013, 03:38 PM
 
374 posts, read 510,286 times
Reputation: 289

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TinaMcG View Post
I strongly urge no one take the advice given above.

Feeding our lawns is not what is making people sick. Pesrticide overspray might be a problem, but feeding your lawn IS important, and it is safer for the user (and the lawn) to apply nitrogen in the form of a granule than by using household ammonia. Throw those Jerry Baker books away, please.

All have opinions here,otherwise you'd have your own site 'just ask Tina'.

You don't have to be so rude.
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Old 03-12-2013, 04:45 PM
 
3,339 posts, read 9,364,010 times
Reputation: 4313
Quote:
Originally Posted by pokesalad4u2 View Post
All have opinions here,otherwise you'd have your own site 'just ask Tina'.

You don't have to be so rude.
When it comes to science, opinions don't count, and horticulture is a science. I learned what I learned from credentialed sources. What you posted was wrong, plain and simple, and I would hate for anyone to get the idea that they can begin raiding their pantries and cleaning supplies to make things to spray on their lawns.

These methods have been discounted time and again. Look for websites with an ".edu" extension in the web address using Google advanced search. Your results will include articles only from universities. Here's a good one from an Extension agent at the University of Michigan State University.

MSU Extension
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Old 03-13-2013, 08:08 PM
 
374 posts, read 510,286 times
Reputation: 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinaMcG View Post
When it comes to science, opinions don't count, and horticulture is a science. I learned what I learned from credentialed sources. What you posted was wrong, plain and simple, and I would hate for anyone to get the idea that they can begin raiding their pantries and cleaning supplies to make things to spray on their lawns.

These methods have been discounted time and again. Look for websites with an ".edu" extension in the web address using Google advanced search. Your results will include articles only from universities. Here's a good one from an Extension agent at the University of Michigan State University.

MSU Extension

I took hort in Gerogia. And the whole class there was treehuggers and green peacers.

We set up many of the 1996 olympics with plants on top of all the studies we had. Had to make blueprints and build greenhouse, irrigation systems, biology,id plants with names,mix formulars and everythign from bud graphs to sowing.But the insecticide class was the worse,even the young honor role students were crying in the halls.
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Old 03-15-2013, 12:09 AM
 
4,739 posts, read 10,453,246 times
Reputation: 4192
Let's see what one of the nations's finest Horticulture schools - the University of Georgia - has to say about fertilization (I bolded some phrases):

Quote:
Organic fertilizers contain the element carbon and come from plant or animal material. Examples are processed sewage sludge (Milorganite), bone meal, cottonseed meal and manures.

Inorganic fertilizers are sometimes referred to as chemical fertilizers. They are derived primarily from chemical compounds such as ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates and potassium chloride. It should be understood that whether nutrients come from organic or inorganic sources, the nutrients are chemicals.

There are advantages and disadvantages to both organic and inorganic fertilizers. Plants absorb fertilizer elements primarily in the inorganic form. Elements in organic fertilizers must therefore be converted to the inorganic form before being absorbed.
Fertilization for Lawns | CAES Publications | UGA

To the OP - this site has some great information about soil and how to amend soil.

To pokesalad - it would be better to drink the beer and then pee on your lawn, rather than use your 'formula':

Quote:
Urine contains large quantities of nitrogen (mostly as urea), as well as significant quantities of dissolved phosphates and potassium, the main macronutrients required by plants, with urine having plant macronutrient percentages (i.e. NPK) of approximately 11-1-2... Undiluted, it can chemically burn the roots of some plants, but it can be used safely as a source of complementary nitrogen in carbon-rich compost... The fertilization effect of urine has been found to be comparable to that of commercial fertilizers with an equivalent NPK rating.
Urine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

To TinaMcG - if I could rep you more I would - your comments are right on!
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:31 AM
 
3,339 posts, read 9,364,010 times
Reputation: 4313
Aw, thanks Reactionary. I don't know about peeing on the lawn, though, for the reason you state, plus the trauma it would cause our neighbors!
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Old 03-15-2013, 08:18 AM
 
2,063 posts, read 7,795,197 times
Reputation: 2757
Thanks Reactionary! It's good to see facts instead of fantasy here.

Infant Gerald as all the others have already said your lawn is there, it is just sparse. Builders often will throw seed from a "builders mix" on top of the mish-mash of soil and sub soil they leave behind. It comes up very quickly and looks green enough to look like a lawn is growing in. The trouble is that a big chunk of that grass is an annual ryegrass that doesn't make it past winter. What you now have growing looks like healthy spring grass, but it looks wet and like there is a lot of old grass and dead leaves mixed in. The soil itself doesn't look bad, but pictures can be deceiving. Either your neighbors have had a few seasons to grow their lawn or they had it sodded. Either way you can catch up with some care this year.

The leaves need to be raked up and you need to see what soil you have so that you can fertilize accordingly. Get in touch with the local Cooperative Extension office to find out about getting a soil test done so you know what you are growing the grass in. Then you will need to go out in the next few weeks and buy seed mixed for your area and seed away. That should be followed with some light fertilizer application if the soil test shows a need. Some of us are lucky and have super rich soils that require very little added, but most of us need some soil help.

WSU Master Gardener: Frequently Asked Questions -- Lawns

Washington Grass Seed

If your yard is perpetually wet, the grass sparseness may also be because the soil is a wetland based one and it may need different seeding and care than a standard lawn. The soil test may reveal some of that information and the rest you might be able to observe. If that is the case you will need to go to a more specialized seed mix. The following is an example of the kind of grasses you might need to consider:
Hobbs & Hopkins Ltd. | ProTime Lawn Seed | Wet Land Seed Mixes
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Old 03-15-2013, 03:30 PM
 
Location: near bears but at least no snakes
26,658 posts, read 28,727,992 times
Reputation: 50557
I don't know where you live but in my part of the country you will have to add lime to your lawn every year, either spring or fall. That's because the soil is too acidic. Have you noticed your neighbors spreading something white over their lawns? That would be lime. You have leaves on the grass and that will add more acidity.

So if you have acid soil, lime will help. Something that helps even more is bonemeal because it will not only take away the acidity but it will provide some nutrients. It is more expensive but it's great stuff.

IF the problem is acidic soil, no amount of fertilizer will work until the soil has a neutral ph. There's a lot of great information here already but I just thought I'd add the part about the type of soil because so often that's the answer or a large part of the answer.
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