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Old 11-04-2007, 07:20 PM
 
1,174 posts, read 6,684,324 times
Reputation: 1095

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Hi guys, I need some direction on dealing with the yard in a cold weather environment. Let me explain.

For all my life I've always lived in a place where winter meant the days maxed out in the 60's to 70's and the nights only dipped in the 50's or so. There was no such thing as feezing weather, snow, or ice.

Now, I'm in a region where in winter it will snow a little from time to time, often get below freezing at night, and occasionally fail to rise above freezing during the day.

Already, I've shut off the sprinkler system and blown out the lines with an air compressor. I found that the night temps were starting to dip below 32F quite often so I didn't want anything to freeze.

I had aready observed that the lawn was no longer growing even though it was being watered. It was still green, but where I needing to mow it twice each week I no longer had any reason to even give it a lite trim.

Our maples have also dropped all their leaves, so they shouldn't need anything. However, I also have some pine trees and various junipers throughout the yard. Of course, they will remain green but their growth will be put on hold until the spring.

I should also mention that this is a new yard. The lawn has been in no longer than 8 weeks. It is the same for the trees, which have about a 3"girth.

Finally, here's the question. Do I really refrain from watering and feeding anything this winter? I can understand doing that with the maples since they are leafless, but what about the pines and junipers? They're evergreens.

I also question whether I should spray the lawn from time to time since it's still green. Some have told me that it will go dormant and turn brown (rye/fescue mix) but that it will return in the spring. It's nothing I have ever dealt with.

Since everything is pretty new and doesn't have an extensive root systems, do I need to be concerned with the existing roots drying out without any water? Perhaps I'm making things up, but I'd hate to see it all die just because I did't drag out the house once a week or so.

Thanks for any suggestions.

Last edited by garth; 11-04-2007 at 07:47 PM..
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Old 11-04-2007, 11:59 PM
 
1,174 posts, read 6,684,324 times
Reputation: 1095
I should add that I'm in Northwest Nevada up against the east slope of the Sierra Nevada. We're in the rain shadow of he mountains. Not much of the rain makes it past them to our side.

Thanks again, everyone.
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Old 11-05-2007, 04:36 AM
 
Location: NE Florida
17,833 posts, read 31,697,916 times
Reputation: 43376
garth
I would call your local extension office, They have folks on hand that love to help answer folks questions. Especially folks new to the area.
You can also see if they offer informative programs on gardening in your area.
I know in our area(Florida) our extension office has great programs on native plants, bugs in the garden, lawn issues just to mention a few.
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Old 11-05-2007, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Journey's End
10,203 posts, read 26,054,742 times
Reputation: 3931
Karla, hit the nail on the head. Advice from a local group.
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Old 11-05-2007, 06:55 PM
 
28,762 posts, read 44,517,599 times
Reputation: 37807
Tree roots grow all winter. Even here in Iowa. We give a fall feeding to our trees and the lawn, and I water everything right up to a hard freeze. If it warms up for a few days in the middle of winter I crack out the hoses and water again.

The neighbors can't figure why all my stuff looks so good!

But I agree with the above posts. Local Extension Service is your best bet.
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