U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-21-2013, 10:25 AM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
22,435 posts, read 28,896,468 times
Reputation: 62003

Advertisements

I invested in a few hydrangea bushes for my "new" old home. They are, to me a very classic 1920s shrub with beautiful blooms.

They are wilting and look terrible!

No, I do not live in a hop climate and they are in partial sun.

No aphids.

Used fertilizer that was suggested at the nursery.

I live in Northern Ohio. Could that be too far North? If so, why are other people's hydrangeas doing well?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-21-2013, 10:53 AM
 
Location: NC
8,593 posts, read 11,868,570 times
Reputation: 18738
Transplant shock? Bad soil? If you bought them in full bloom and have just replanted them, you might also want to cut them back so that the roots don't have to support so much above ground material while the roots are getting established. As far as bad soil, consider what other plants were there previously, and if there were no plants, why was that?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2013, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
77,804 posts, read 97,252,394 times
Reputation: 49090
that is too bad, we love them and we have to put up the wilting from this time of year until the weather cools off.

Our problem isn't just the wilting, but this year we did not get one single bloom. I have no idea what happened. We did have a horrible hot summer last year, but they came back this year with lovely green leaves and then NOTHING!!!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2013, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,472 posts, read 15,582,735 times
Reputation: 6495
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
I invested in a few hydrangea bushes for my "new" old home. They are, to me a very classic 1920s shrub with beautiful blooms.

They are wilting and look terrible!

No, I do not live in a hop climate and they are in partial sun.

No aphids.

Used fertilizer that was suggested at the nursery.

I live in Northern Ohio. Could that be too far North? If so, why are other people's hydrangeas doing well?

Fertilizer Burn?


The fertilizer may be stressing them out. The first year or so they're in the ground, the roots need to grow to support the plant, and sometimes excess fertilizer burns the new roots which are just stretching out. I made the same mistake with some shrubs, and I had to water like heck to leach the fertilizer out of the ground.

I haven't noticed that hydrangeas need any fertilizer at all. Maybe once every couple of years if the soil is poor and you don't mulch. If these are new plants, I'd water them well and deeply until they are established. After that, you can decide whether or not they need fertilizer.

Too Much Afternoon Sun?


Hydrangeas are OK with some sun depending on the variety, but mine do the best in light shade, with no or minimal direct sunlight. If you are getting sun in the afternoon directly on the hydrangea leaves, this may be too hot for them. The time of day matters with sunlight intensity. Many shade-loving plants can deal with morning sun, but sun in the afternoon is very hot, and even an hour or two of direct afternoon sun may stress them. If you leave them there and they survive until next year, they may have a stronger root system in order to cope with the direct sun. Otherwise, I'd suggest moving them to someplace where they get light shade or only morning sun. BTW I am in zone 7.

If you review the amount of sunlight, and it turns out the spot is in fact too sunny, you can try hydrangea paniculata.

Planted in Summer?

I just went to my big box store, and I noticed they were selling hydrangeas now...in summer. Now is not a good time to plant hydrangeas, because they're actively growing and it is hot. If they survive, it may get better next year. The best time to plant deciduous shrubs is Fall, when it is a bit cooler.



BTW, I have macrophylla, quercifolia, arborescens and serrata hydrangea which are doing ok.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2013, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,502 posts, read 50,628,320 times
Reputation: 47755
The only kind of fertilizer I ever use on anything when freshly planted is a transplant fertilizer which helps with transplant shock. The last thing a shrub or tree needs when getting used to a new environment is fertilizer! Water like crazy to run that fertilizer out and check to see how much sun they are getting. I've found that only morning sun is all mine ever need. How did you prepare the soil? are they mulched well?

I'll bet that nursery worker recommended the fertilizer we use on established plants and did not know it can cause harm on something freshly planted.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2013, 08:58 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
38,838 posts, read 69,819,340 times
Reputation: 46621
Even in our cool summer Seattle climate I have to water our 4 Hydrangeas about every other day or they wilt, and they get very little sun. They are water hogs, but need good draining soil or can suffer from root rot. The most common reason for lack of blooms is improper pruning. They should be pruned in spring when the buds start to swell, and then you should cut below the dead blooms from the last season but above the first pair of bus. That's where the new flowers come from. If you prune too low there will be no blooms.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2013, 10:01 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
42,589 posts, read 56,763,172 times
Reputation: 120625
OP your area is just fine for growing hydrangeas. You didn't mention what type of fertilizer you were sold at the nursery. Was it a real nursery or a garden center in a home improvement store. There's a big difference in quality and informed people between these outfits.
It sounds as if you have fertilizer shock from burning the new tender roots. Or your root ball fell apart and it's in plain ol transplant shock. You need to watch your watering and do not fertilize until next spring.
Here is a good informational site for growing hydrangeas successfully:
Planting, Transplanting, and Fertilizing Hydrangeas
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2013, 10:32 AM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
22,435 posts, read 28,896,468 times
Reputation: 62003
It was a real local nursery. They were not planted in Summer, but in Spring. I thought that it might be that the roots needed to take hold. I'd honestly never heard of transplant shock before. How ling does it last.

I used very little fertilizer. I was also given something to help with the color.

I am not an accomplished gardener and I am new to "serious" gardening. Before this, my gardening was limited to planting some easy annuals for color each year, and living with what ever the previous home owner had planted. Now I am in "the house" - most likely my last; if we have it our way.

We'd like to establish a garden that will give us joy year after year.
Plantings that came with the house include azaleas, rhododendron, flowering plum and hostas.

I have planted echinacea, and black eyed susan's and they are doing well. So are Asiatic Lillies.

In the Fall, I plan to plant tulips, daffodils and crocuses for and early Spring display. My goal in to have something blooming at all times possible.

I was also attracted to hydrangeas for their long blooming period.

We were defiantly cautious when it came to the fertilizer.

And trust me, too much sun has not been an issue here. I don't think that we've had more that a few days of full sun.

Thank you for your help!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2013, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 8,525,330 times
Reputation: 13779
I feel your pain, sheena! I love hyrdrangeas, especially the macrophyllas, but I have had some issues with them. I live on a cold, windy hill (even though it's in the city) with clayey soil, and some of my hydrangeas have suffered. Two types that should do well in your area, even in part sun, are the arborescens (best known cultivar: 'Annabelle') and the paniculatas (frequently pruned into small trees), both of which bloom on new wood. The macrophyllas and the quercifolias do better in afternoon shade even in the north, and since they bloom on old wood, they need good siting and possibly winter protection. Hydrangeas should only be pruned right after blooming for best blooms next year.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2013, 02:18 PM
 
8,545 posts, read 15,391,936 times
Reputation: 14199
I have had problems with mine also. We are in upstate NY and was told not to cut them back as they won't bloom. We transplanted them in the spring and only had one bloom, so maybe next year. We were out on Cape Cod and the hydrangeas there are amazing! All colors and huge blooms.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top