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Old 08-10-2013, 09:03 PM
 
Location: In climate zone Cfa/hardiness zone 8a /zip code 76131
3,958 posts, read 2,500,152 times
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Here Just North of Indianapolis, In Noblesville Indiana I noticed, Golden Euonymus(Marginally Hardy to area,Zone 6), Liriope Muscari Varigata grass(Marginal), and 3 different Varities of Crape Myrtles being sold!! The Cultivars of Crape Myrtle I saw were 'Seminole', 'Victor', and 'Centennial'; never thought people up here would have the nerve to sell Crape Myrtles in Central Indiana!!!However, I see they can attain large shrub size near Cincinnati,Ohio in a town called Lawrenceburg,Indiana, so apparently they survive just fine near the Ohio river in extreme southern Indiana. I know a man who touts crapes as being "root hardy" here in central Indiana, but I wonder just how far north are these Crape Myrtles considered to be "root hardy"? Down in Indianapolis, I noted the that they were selling Hardy Cultivars of the Southern Magnolia tree such as the 'Edith Bogue' and Eagle Creek Nursery was daring to sell the 'D.D. Blanchard' cultivar as well as the aforementioned 'Edith Bogue'.
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Old 08-11-2013, 04:30 AM
B87
 
Location: Surrey/London
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Avocados and date palms.
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Old 10-05-2013, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Miami,FL
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soursop(zone 11b)
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Old 10-07-2013, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,472 posts, read 14,689,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miamihurricane555 View Post
soursop(zone 11b)
Mmmmm Soursop! For anyone else who may miss the tropics, and is forced to live in a cold area, the native American Pawpaw tastes almost exactly like soursop. Plus the leaves are big and relatively "tropical" looking.

Our nurseries seem to be pretty responsible, and I haven't seen too many plants sold as hardy here. Normally they sell perennials from warmer zones as "annuals." For instance, begonia, elephant ears and cannas.

I did buy a parrots beak "on sale" from a local nursery. I was pissed. It was marked only as "perennial." Sadly, not in my zone. By the time I'd researched it, I'd already taken it out of the pot, divided it into several pieces and planted it. Now I try to take a list and resist buying unknown plants.
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Old 10-08-2013, 01:52 PM
 
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Here in NW Ohio, zone 5b, I believe, a friend of mine grows banana plants. She has one that's taller than she is.
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Old 10-10-2013, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Oviedo
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KuKui (Candlenut) trees (also zone 11b) in 9b (naturalized now...finally)
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Old 10-10-2013, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Miami,FL
2,889 posts, read 3,521,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
Mmmmm Soursop! For anyone else who may miss the tropics, and is forced to live in a cold area, the native American Pawpaw tastes almost exactly like soursop. Plus the leaves are big and relatively "tropical" looking.

Our nurseries seem to be pretty responsible, and I haven't seen too many plants sold as hardy here. Normally they sell perennials from warmer zones as "annuals." For instance, begonia, elephant ears and cannas.

I did buy a parrots beak "on sale" from a local nursery. I was pissed. It was marked only as "perennial." Sadly, not in my zone. By the time I'd researched it, I'd already taken it out of the pot, divided it into several pieces and planted it. Now I try to take a list and resist buying unknown plants.
I wonder If I can buy some of that pawpaw to eat. I've never heard of it before but if it tastes like guanabana(soursop) I definitely want to try it .
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Old 11-07-2013, 11:23 PM
 
Location: In climate zone Cfa/hardiness zone 8a /zip code 76131
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Fuzzymystic, I forgot to mention that people here in the Indianapolis area also have been successfully growing Banana plants for years(since about 2005 or thereabout) I believe the brand of Banana plant that your neighbor is growing is the same as what people are growing in Indianapolis, which is the Japanese Hardy Banana(Musa Basjoo), and just FYI, Northwest Ohio, most of it anyways, is Actually a Hardiness Zone 6a, under the Revised 2012 USDA Hardiness Zone map.
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Old 11-08-2013, 12:02 AM
 
1,964 posts, read 2,761,807 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
Fuzzymystic, I forgot to mention that people here in the Indianapolis area also have been successfully growing Banana plants for years(since about 2005 or thereabout) I believe the brand of Banana plant that your neighbor is growing is the same as what people are growing in Indianapolis, which is the Japanese Hardy Banana(Musa Basjoo), and just FYI, Northwest Ohio, most of it anyways, is Actually a Hardiness Zone 6a, under the Revised 2012 USDA Hardiness Zone map.
You're right, these are grown as perennials in colder areas.

Regarding Edith Bogue, I wonder how the Edith Bogue fares farther up north during snowstorms. The long, sweeping limbs of the southern magnolia tend to get pretty weighted down when rare snowstorms come down south.

In NC, I attempted to grow a cold hardy variety of almond (hall's I think) twice and failed. It was sent bare-root and froze due to my negligence the first time. The second time the scion died and only the rootstock sent up some leaders. I also attempted a pomegranate which never yielded fruit. Here in L.A., I've seen people attempt to grow things that require greater chill hours with some limited success such as apples, lilies, and some varieties of peaches.

As any gardner knows, just because something doesn't grow in a particular area, doesn't stop the nursery from trying to sell it there!!!
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Old 11-08-2013, 12:13 AM
 
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don't know if this exactly qualifies for inclusion in the discussion but I'm still very pleased and rather surprised that a variety of plants (oaks, pines, maples, magnolias) from relatively high elevations (4500'-7000' or more) in the humid/summer wet climate of the "cloud forests" of northern and central mexico ( roughly lat. 25 to 20 north) can do as well as they do in lowland coastal Oregon with a distinct summer dry period at lat. 43 north (a roughly 1300 miles distance between the their homeland and my garden.
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