U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-12-2013, 08:54 AM
 
8,742 posts, read 11,917,269 times
Reputation: 10491

Advertisements

What do you do to prepare your lawn & garden for the winter and will have good growth in the spring? If you are "old pro" at this for having done it many years, share your tips with newbies who are eager to learn!

for example, I plan to fertilize & reseed my lawn but I am not sure what fertilizer is best? Is this s good time to apply weed-killers? I have bermuda but I plan to winter sow with annual rye grass. How about caring for my fruit trees? Should I fertilize it for the winter? High P and K but low N type to encourage root growth?

Last edited by HB2HSV; 09-12-2013 at 09:03 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-14-2013, 05:16 PM
 
8,742 posts, read 11,917,269 times
Reputation: 10491
Wow. After 78 views and not reply? Really?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2013, 06:41 PM
 
3,339 posts, read 8,961,353 times
Reputation: 4293
Treat the winter weeds now: broadleaf dandelions, henbit. Forget the grassy warm-season annual weeds. But don't treat weeds if you are doing a big overseeding job in the lawn.

What you want in a fertilizer (for cool season grasses like fescue and bluegrass) is quick-release food that is high in nitrogen. You don't need P and K at this time. Fertilize now and again around Thanksgiving. My turfgrass prof used to say, "Feed it at Thanksgiving! Punch the hell out of it with nitrogen -- the cheaper the better!" And he was so right. All that nitrogen is taken up by the grass and stored over winter as food. As long as the gound isn't frozen, the grass plants are developing more tillers -- and tillers are the source of new grass blades. With a bunching grass like fescue, you want tiller development, and the more nitrogen the grass has over winter, the better. Come springtime, your lawn will be thick and green and you probably won't have to feed it.

I got an A in turfgrass science, by the way.I hated working on lawns until I had that professor.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2013, 01:17 AM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
11,033 posts, read 22,605,079 times
Reputation: 10803
Sorry, we don't do much special for fall and winter. I'm planting the cooler weather varieties of lettuce, although I doubt that sort of advice would do you much good.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2013, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Aiken, South Carolina, US of A
1,794 posts, read 4,661,438 times
Reputation: 3664
HB,
I know nothing about fruit trees. Sorry.
You really can't hurt Bermuda grass in any way, so you can just
seed with the annual rye. Be careful not to over fertilize your exsisting
lawn if you want rye to grow.
I don't do that to my lawn because its not good for your exsisting grass,
but then again, it is Bermuda.
Don't put down any weed killer is you are seeding rye.
You'll have to water it every day.
You'll also have to cut it in the winter, itll get longish.
Personally I look forward to the winter when the grass so asleep and mowing
is finally over for the season. LOL.
So it's brown, who cares? No work to do either.
Good Luck with that rye grass.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-16-2013, 02:10 PM
 
8,742 posts, read 11,917,269 times
Reputation: 10491
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinaMcG
What you want in a fertilizer (for cool season grasses like fescue and bluegrass) is quick-release food that is high in nitrogen. You don't need P and K at this time. Fertilize now and again around Thanksgiving. My turfgrass prof used to say, "Feed it at Thanksgiving! Punch the hell out of it with nitrogen -- the cheaper the better!" And he was so right. All that nitrogen is taken up by the grass and stored over winter as food. As long as the gound isn't frozen, the grass plants are developing more tillers -- and tillers are the source of new grass blades.
Thanks. This I can do and it will get the grass healthy for spring.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Butterfly4U
Personally I look forward to the winter when the grass so asleep and mowing is finally over for the season. LOL.
So it's brown, who cares? No work to do either
Thanks guys for your replies. Good advices overall. I am rethinking about the overwinter rye grass sowing (less work part). Maybe I'll just lay back, enjoy a hot coffee while watching freaking cold lawn in the winter.

Maybe I'll just build another lasagna flower bed over the winter...
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-17-2013, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
46,536 posts, read 57,937,299 times
Reputation: 84634
I've been told not to fertilize centipede grass in the fall, so we don't. It just goes dormant anyway. Once it gets cool, we will prune the shrubbery, and tidy up the beds, replacing mulch if necessary. We will replace any plants that need it. Right now, for some reason, the Indian hawthorn on one side of our front porch is dying, while the one on the other side is fine. Not sure why, but we will most likely rip them all out and plant something else, to keep the symmetry.
We really like to spend crisp days out in the yard, but here in GA we have to wait until November or so.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-17-2013, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Aiken, South Carolina, US of A
1,794 posts, read 4,661,438 times
Reputation: 3664
HB2,
Tina gave you advise for COLD season grass, not Bermuda.
Bermuda is a warm season grass, which means it goes to sleep when the
temps get below 40 degrees.
You can fertilize Bermuda grass, but usually it is not recommended because the
grass is going to go to sleep, It won't hurt Bermuda, nothing kills Bermuda.
I would wait til February, Valentines Day, and apply a Preemergence on the lawn.
Then you can start fertilizing your Bermuda 2 weeks after it wakes up and turns green again.
Go to the Internet search bar and type in The Bermuda Bible and read it.
It will tell you everything you need to do and when for your lawn.
By the way, I love the idea of another garden.
Winter gardening in the south is awesome! Delicious crisp lettuce
and no bugs or mosquitos!!!!! LOL.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-18-2013, 10:16 PM
 
4,740 posts, read 9,922,929 times
Reputation: 4172
Ack, you just missed the Fall Turf Maintenance class at the Huntsville Botanical Garden (last Saturday), but note that the Fall Plant Sale is October 12th and 13th. I don't know if they'll have flowering lasagna on sale...

Before applying Phospate to your soil, get a soil test from Auburn (test kits available at the Madison County Extension office on Cook Ave next to Krispy Kreme). The soil in our area generally has more than enough phospate in it already without having to add more.

If you're going to fertilize your bermudagrass, do it soon with a low N zero P low K (potassium might help root growth over winter). Fertilizing bermudagrass too late in the fall can hurt the lawn if we have a warm spell (i.e., Indian Summer) that interrupts the dormancy (making the grass succeptible to winter damage, disease, and insects).

If you weren't thinking of overseeding with rye grass, now would be a good time to apply pre-emergent (to prevent cool season weeds like henbit and poa annua), else apply after the rye is established.

I'm not a big fan of overseeding bermudagrass with rye grass - IMO it uses nutrients that should be available to your permanent bermuda lawn, plus it can delay and weaken Spring bermuda growth.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-19-2013, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,470 posts, read 15,763,459 times
Reputation: 6505
I'm in MD and we have new regulations about fertilization to prevent runoff into waterways. I personally would not recommend adding fertilizer at the beginning of winter. I have a feeling it would just wash off. This sounds harmless, but excess nutrients can be harmful to the waterways we all enjoy. MD has provided some guidlines for residents which may be helpful if you are planning to fertilize your lawn:
http://mda.maryland.gov/resource_con...zerwebpage.pdf


Other things I do for my yard in Fall:
1. Mulch - I mulch with leaves and regular mulch.

2. "Prune" unwanted trees/shrubs/brush - It is not too cold, so my hands don't freeze, and fewer leaves mean that the limbs are easier to see, cut and haul away. I finally used vinegar as an herbicide, and it really works!

3. Remove Invasive vines - Honeysuckle and oriental bittersweet were all over the woods killing trees, but a couple of years later they are gone or under control in most areas. I didn't use any chemicals, I just pull these up in Autumn.

4. Plant and Transplant - A lot of native wildflowers need a cold period to germinate. Fall is a great time to scatter seeds for plants such as aquilegia, echinacea, evening primrose and milkweed. I plant lilies, hyacinth and peony roots in Autumn. Now is also a good time to divide peonies in my zone. I notice squirrels seem to be less likely to dig up freshly planted items in Fall than they are in Spring.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:48 PM.

© 2005-2023, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top