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Old 01-28-2014, 06:26 PM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,419 posts, read 40,670,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
Is that going by the updated 2012 version or the old 1990 version of the plant hardiness map? Not that it matters much since many northern areas except the Northeast have had colder than what the new 2012 plant hardiness map would suggest as being the average.
That is going by my specific topography, my local extension office, and the master gardeners in my area.
No smacking of the head required!
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Old 01-28-2014, 06:46 PM
 
Location: In climate zone Cfa/hardiness zone 8a /zip code 76131
4,062 posts, read 2,660,814 times
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Default hardiness zone in immediate area

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitt Chick View Post
That is going by my specific topography, my local extension office, and the master gardeners in my area.
No smacking of the head required!
Alrighty then well I guess that the area that you live in that has from the 1990 and the 2012 maps been labeled a Hardiness Zone 6 has a huge flaw and that they are overestimating what can be grown there. I say this because southwest Pa is almost entirely a Zone 6 based on those maps. Makes me Wonder what Indianapolis's real Hardiness Zone is rather than Going by a USDA Plant Map which is most likely Government Funded to back up their agenda. You are a Zone 5a which puts your minimum extreme temperatures on average to be between -15 and -20 degrees Fahrenheit, yet that colorful map made by the USDA seems to suggest otherwise.
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Old 01-28-2014, 06:49 PM
 
Location: southwestern PA
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Yep - weird micro-climate here.
I can have two or three inches of snow on my yard when it is pouring rain two miles away.
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Old 01-28-2014, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Northville, MI
11,882 posts, read 12,171,497 times
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I wonder how Eire PA is in the same zone as southern NJ . That just isn't right in my opinion. Eire must be classified with Cleveland and Buffalo, not Philadelphia.
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Old 01-28-2014, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Northville, MI
11,882 posts, read 12,171,497 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dakotafl View Post
I am in Zone 10a South Brevard county fl, In a freak winter we can dip into the upper 20s but almost all winters we never drop below the 30F, that is on the mainland, on the barrier islands it meets the 10b requirement.

We have Trees like Avocados, Mangos, Royal Poinciana, Royal Palms, Coconut Palms, Queen Palms ect, only in the worst winter will they be damaged.
I guess you are enjoying beautiful weather right now as well. Care to send some pics of those trees.
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Old 01-29-2014, 02:51 AM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
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I haven't a clue what zone I'm in. Is there such a one as 12? It never gets below freezing and rarely below mid fifties. Hard to grow stone fruit but tropicals do fine. There's avocados falling all over the yard at the moment. The variety is "Lehua" if anyone is tracking avocados.


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Old 01-29-2014, 02:58 AM
 
Location: In climate zone Cfa/hardiness zone 8a /zip code 76131
4,062 posts, read 2,660,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hotzcatz View Post
I haven't a clue what zone I'm in. Is there such a one as 12? It never gets below freezing and rarely below mid fifties. Hard to grow stone fruit but tropicals do fine. There's avocados falling all over the yard at the moment. The variety is "Lehua" if anyone is tracking avocados.

I would say you are at least a Zone 12 or possibly even the cool end of Zone 13 based on what you are growing there in your yard.
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Old 01-29-2014, 03:07 AM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
10,741 posts, read 20,633,653 times
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I didn't even know there was a zone 13.

The fellow who built the house in the 70's planted the avocado, tangerine, lemon, moringa and grapefruit trees. I've added bananas, low chill peach, low chill apple, several raised bed vegetable planters and papayas. Grapes and cotton for later this year. A lot of food comes from this yard and it's just a small quarter acre residential lot.
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Old 01-29-2014, 03:56 AM
 
Location: In climate zone Cfa/hardiness zone 8a /zip code 76131
4,062 posts, read 2,660,814 times
Reputation: 1467
[quote=hotzcatz;33231413]I didn't even know there was a zone 13.

The fellow who built the house in the 70's planted the avocado, tangerine, lemon, moringa and grapefruit trees. I've added bananas, low chill peach, low chill apple, several raised bed vegetable planters and papayas. Grapes and cotton for later this year. A lot of food comes from this yard and it's just a small quarter acre residential lot.[/QUOTE) I read somewhere that the plant hardiness zone system goes from 1 to 15 or 16 different zones, from -60 F to where the minimum never really deviates much below 65 F or maybe 70 F? Which the upper limit would be strictly closer to the Equatorial climates.
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Old 01-29-2014, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,607 posts, read 1,596,097 times
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I feel that our zone 6B is accurate, as we can grow evergreen southern magnolia and fig trees with little to no damage most years.
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