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Old 02-17-2014, 10:32 AM
 
Location: SC
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This will be my first spring in SC and I need advice on planting some annuals in outdoor hanging planters or deck rail planters. Is this a viable option in the summer heat in the south? Even up north I had to water my outdoor potted annuals carefully to avoid them burning/drying out in the summer heat. Geraniums, petunias, sweet potato vines, etc., are what I am used to, but not sure how well they tolerate the heat down here?

How do you handle your potted annuals?

What are popular and hardy annuals for pots in the SE? This is not Florida, so we are not tropical. I need plantings that can handle southern exposure.

I plan on buying some deck planters today, are there any soil amendments I should add in the bottom of the planters to help keep moisture in?

Any advice is appreciated. I feel like I have to start over learning all of the differing plants down here; it's tough after living up north my whole life and being so familiar with all of the perennials and annuals in that region. I feel lost as far as what to plant here.

Here are the planters I am looking into buying:

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Old 02-17-2014, 11:32 AM
 
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You can add water retaining granules to the soil. As you water the plants, the granules will swell and drink up some of the water. As the soil dries out, the granules will release the water into the soil. It will allow you to water less often.
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Old 02-18-2014, 01:38 AM
 
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Several of the potted plants on my Southern facing porch were fried. It has a stone floor though so I imagine the poor things were just baked. I do recall some Impatiens surviving in some hot situations however I could be mistaken..
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Old 02-18-2014, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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You might want to invest in self watering pots sold all over the internet garden sites. Expensive but they will save you from ruining some plants, or even killing them. i live in N.C. and I know about porch plants and planters but I avoid all south facing areas (in the ground). Even on my sheltered south facing front porch I have to water twice a day in the true heat of the summer. They sell some very good potting soil at the big box stores so you shouldn't have to add anything. just be sure to have excellent drainage. Forget about trying to use moss baskets as they dry out too much. The annuals you mention will do well but contact or look at your county's extension service to see what they recommend for your zone.
If you will be a Southerner from here on out I would recommend taking the Master Gardeners Course put on by your extension service. Valuable for all kinds of plant choices as well as maintenance.
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Old 02-18-2014, 04:17 PM
 
Location: SC
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Thanks for the info. I stopped using the fiber/moss baskets even up north because they let too much warm air in around the roots and were too hard on my baskets.

If anyone else from SC or Georgia reads this, would love to hear what annuals you use in pots and planters.
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Old 02-18-2014, 04:25 PM
 
1,964 posts, read 3,062,247 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
You might want to invest in self watering pots sold all over the internet garden sites. Expensive but they will save you from ruining some plants, or even killing them. i live in N.C. and I know about porch plants and planters but I avoid all south facing areas (in the ground). Even on my sheltered south facing front porch I have to water twice a day in the true heat of the summer. They sell some very good potting soil at the big box stores so you shouldn't have to add anything. just be sure to have excellent drainage. Forget about trying to use moss baskets as they dry out too much. The annuals you mention will do well but contact or look at your county's extension service to see what they recommend for your zone.
If you will be a Southerner from here on out I would recommend taking the Master Gardeners Course put on by your extension service. Valuable for all kinds of plant choices as well as maintenance.
There are still some things that thrive in southern facing areas in the ground! As long as it isn't in pots or on porches. My tea olive, rabbit eye blueberries, persimmons, and various other fruit trees are thriving on the South side.
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Old 02-18-2014, 10:01 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RoaminRebel View Post
There are still some things that thrive in southern facing areas in the ground! As long as it isn't in pots or on porches. My tea olive, rabbit eye blueberries, persimmons, and various other fruit trees are thriving on the South side.
Of course there are many many things that thrive in the ground with a southern exposure but this OP is asking about annuals.
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Old 02-19-2014, 09:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Of course there are many many things that thrive in the ground with a southern exposure but this OP is asking about annuals.
Through the course of reading the thread I might've forgot that detail..
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Old 02-20-2014, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Aiken, South Carolina, US of A
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Bmachina,
Welcome to South Carolina! Hope you enjoy your first summer here, or growing
summer.
It's a smart thing to plant in pots here, I live in the Midlands in the sand hills, and
our soil is terrible. So pots are great, and less weeds.
I grow pansies, have them out front now, they last all winter and will probably
stop blooming by the end of May.
Marigolds, really, almost any annual will do well here in pots.
If you have to have the pot in full sun, in June, July and August, EARLY
in the morning, or at night, just give your plants a good drink. You will have
to check the soil to see if they need it, but don't be surprised if you water
almost every night.
They will take the sun. I love dahlia in pots, they come back here.
They are beautiful, and are annuals up north, but not here. Cannas are perennials
down here too!
Hope you have fun at the nursery this year!
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Old 02-21-2014, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
45,166 posts, read 56,485,563 times
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I am a northern transplant too, and although I used to have great success at planters up north, I have had to give up in dismay in Savannah. Perhaps you are far enough north to fare better. Things I cannot grow here are staples like geraniums (I've heard the night temps are too hot), shade impatiens, and petunias. Sweet potato vines do OK.
Part of the problem is things dry out so fast that it is hard to keep them moist in containers.
You have a fighting chance if you stick to things that like to bake in the sun. Lantana is one, and although they're perennials, repeat blooming daylilies do well.
In my large planters I have finally settled on some sun loving perennials like salvia and some small flowering shrubs. I have some tulips coming up in them now.
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