U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 11-05-2014, 08:31 PM
 
1,316 posts, read 2,329,746 times
Reputation: 1300

Advertisements

Hello!
I am a gardener located in eastern Pennsylvania. I rooted several cuttings of Hydrangea paniculata grandiflora or the PG Hydrangea at the half-ripe wood stage back in late Spring. I don't know how to hold them over for the Winter. Someone suggested a cold frame, but I don't have one.

Some years it is possible to hold things like this over just in the pot left outside. Usually, however, some of them die in very late Winter, just as things are going through that thaw/freeze again cycle. BUT enough of them survive to make this a fun and worthwhile thing to do. Some background: I like to pot up tree and shrub seedlings and grow them in pots for a few years before finding them new homes. It is taking a chance to leave them just in the pots. This time I don't want to lose any of them. Really, any time I don't want to lose any of them.

Could they be put in an unheated garage and watered as needed? Should they be buried in the pot, healed in but in the pot?

I also have several spruce trees, assorted native hardwoods, an oak seedling and a few others, notably a Gingko biloba seedling and some Lilacs and rooted bits of old roses of great sentimental value. Many of these were grown in pots on the back patio to keep them from deer. If they are buried in the pot, they will need to be protected from deer.

How do I hold these all over the Winter so they don't die? I know that leaving them in the pot is taking way too great a chance this year.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-06-2014, 12:47 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
32,482 posts, read 59,182,951 times
Reputation: 35590
You need to keep the roots from freezing hard. I have close to 100 bonsai and some of them are not hardy enough to get through winter unprotected. When it's in the 30s just mulch the pots and bottom few inches of the trunk with bark. When it gets below freezing I will bring them into the unheated garage or shed. Just keep them away from windows where they will get light or they may sprout too early if it's in the 40s or above in there. When it gets above freezing take them back out.
You should only give them a little water once a week or every 10 days, to keep the roots from drying out, they will not be actually using it while dormant.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2014, 03:39 PM
 
1,316 posts, read 2,329,746 times
Reputation: 1300
Thank you, Hemlock140. Here in PA it can go as low as 10, sometimes even lower. Then, in the very late Winter or early Spring the late freezes and drying outs will kill the plants. So will the dry freezes in the Winter. I will probably move them into the garage. The spruce seedlings will probably be healed in out in a flower bed. I don't know what to do about the Ginkgo. I will probably put that in the garage, too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2014, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,472 posts, read 14,571,903 times
Reputation: 6454
Hmm can you put them in the ground next to the house and mulch them very well? I put some young cuttings in the ground and they lived through the winter...but some DID die as you mentioned. I did this is the woods and it was not next to the house.

If they're next to the house maybe that will keep them from freezing and will be less work for you. Best of luck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2014, 08:53 PM
 
Location: CO
2,454 posts, read 2,847,537 times
Reputation: 5225
In zone 5 here. I buried my hydrangeas up to their necks in plastic pots in a pile of dirt near my back door. Covered them with leaves too. I'll water them intermittently through the winter. Will it work? Maybe. My gardening friend in the same town does this heeling in method regularly and has pretty good luck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-10-2014, 05:19 PM
 
1,316 posts, read 2,329,746 times
Reputation: 1300
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
In zone 5 here. I buried my hydrangeas up to their necks in plastic pots in a pile of dirt near my back door. Covered them with leaves too. I'll water them intermittently through the winter. Will it work? Maybe. My gardening friend in the same town does this heeling in method regularly and has pretty good luck.
Lost Roses, were these hydrangeas cuttings, or potted plants?

I am especially worried about the rose cuttings, although they are a tough, tough old variety of rambler rose.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-10-2014, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,653 posts, read 2,137,891 times
Reputation: 2812
OP, bury them in the ground, water them initially then periodically through the winter, then dig them up again in the spring. PG hydrangeas are hardy to cold. I grew one in Wis.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2014, 11:13 AM
 
Location: CO
2,454 posts, read 2,847,537 times
Reputation: 5225
Quote:
Originally Posted by katnip kid View Post
Lost Roses, were these hydrangeas cuttings, or potted plants?

I am especially worried about the rose cuttings, although they are a tough, tough old variety of rambler rose.
Katnip, I grew them in large pots all summer in my container garden. I buried them in smaller plastic pots in a hill of dirt (excess from old pots, etc.) because my clay soil is too hard to dig to bury a whole pot. Are your cuttings rooted? I gathered that they were pretty well-developed?

I wouldn't worry about your rose. I think it's more important to make sure they get adequate moisture in the winter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2014, 02:26 PM
 
1,316 posts, read 2,329,746 times
Reputation: 1300
Hello all!
Yes, the cuttings were rooted. In the case of the roses, they were not heavily rooted. I don't know about the PGs. I will definitely bury them in a hill of dirt. I am concerned about moisture. If they are buried, I won't be able to water them as the ground will be frozen. I'm guessing the pots would get enough moisture from the ground.

The ginkgo is probably better in the garage. The deer have discovered it!

A big thank you to all the helpful comments!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top