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Old 05-05-2015, 09:43 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,504 posts, read 46,063,271 times
Reputation: 47523

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I swapped some Louisanna Iris for some Skirt Chaser Japanese iris with a neighbor. Both can be invasive but I think the Louisianna spread by seed while Skirt Chaser by stolons. Info says it is good in part shade to full shade but don't most iris bloom better with sun? I know they are very early bloomers. I was thinking of planting them in a wildflower meadow I have ordered seed for. Has anybody grown them? Will I regret it?
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Old 05-06-2015, 08:23 PM
 
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well, "Japanese" iris (iris enseta) AND the Louisiana iris types are water demanding plants so unless you have a naturally damp spot this may not be a good species if your planting site has well drained/sandy soil and/or is prone to late spring/early summer dry spells. if you plan to periodically mow your wild flower meadow you may have to wait until at least late summer early fall or maybe later for some kind of dormancy to set in so the mowing won't damage the foliage.

FWIW, many of the commercial "wildflower" mixes are not especially adapted to the kind of conditions the iris's like OR are mainly annuals as opposed to the perennial iris plants---whether this MIGHT be either a short or long term consideration is at least something to consider. moisture loving perennial plants like lobelia cardinalis might be another option for planting in your space. good luck.
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Old 05-06-2015, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,504 posts, read 46,063,271 times
Reputation: 47523
Thank you but my research and years of experience with Louisianna Iris is that they do NOT need a lot of water. They have gone to town in a very dry area of my yard and I'm giving them away cause they are so taking over. I did have them in a previous koi pond garden and wondered how they would do in this garden without wet feet and they are fine.

I can't look them up now but I think they - skirt chasers- are evergreen which sounds strange to me. I remember finding some iris which is evergreen during my research. Certainly don't want to include anything evergreen in my wildflower meadow so i just planted then in a rather shady area close to the proposed wildflower meadow. Also surprised to learn they do better in shade than in full sun like most iris.

Thanks for your response. I'll be interested to see what they do.
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Old 05-06-2015, 08:56 PM
 
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actually, there are a number of evergreen iris species and hybrids---though most people are familiar only with the deciduous bearded iris and the also deciduous bulbous "Dutch", "Spanish", and 'English" iris. just guessing but are you in an area that has summer rain? FWIW, my experience is with areas on the west coast with basically little or no rain from late may thru mid sept. and thus certain plants may need different care to do well.
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Old 05-06-2015, 09:15 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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yes we get lots of summer rain in NC as well as very dry times. But NC is very lush and our droughts are not as severe as west coast droughts.
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Old 05-06-2015, 09:27 PM
 
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actually, our normal summers would most likely be regarded as full on drought periods for you---july and august rainfall here is basically zilch and late may/june not very much either---the benefit and downfall of a "Mediterranean" rainfall pattern. any plant that requires summer water must either be irrigated or specially sited or it goes dormant or maybe dead sooner or later. OTOH, the native evergreen iris like I. douglasiana (and the beautiful "pacific coast hybrids" derived from it) are generally o.k. with dry summers.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; 05-06-2015 at 09:36 PM..
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Old 05-07-2015, 05:50 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,504 posts, read 46,063,271 times
Reputation: 47523
bet they wouldn't make it here. But I'd like to try. Iris are so maintenance free and I'm all for anything The Long Legged Rats won't eat!
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Old 05-07-2015, 08:52 AM
 
1,566 posts, read 965,417 times
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you might try looking at "plant delights" on-line nursery. they have lots of iris of varying types for sale including the evergreen and the likely drought tolerant but possibly adaptable to your conditions iris unguicularis (Algerian iris)---kind of pricey plants but some good pictures and useful info that might be of help in further searches in other places. other tough perennials of iris-like appearance include the various "new" colored (yellow, orange, bi-colored) montbretias (crocosmia) and the MANY different daylilies (I recommend the evergreen types).
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Old 05-07-2015, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,504 posts, read 46,063,271 times
Reputation: 47523
Tony Avent's Plants Delight is only 30 minutes from my house and we go to his open houses several times a year. DH gets a bit peeved cause I lose all reason and go hog wild.Just walking in his beautiful gardens is a treat but walking up and down row after row in his green houses is plum orgasmic..sorry too much information . But to a passionate gardener it is nirvana. I'm on his FB list and enjoy all his many introductions. His catalogue alone is better than a text book. I'll study it some this weekend to improve my knowledge of irises.
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Old 05-07-2015, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,504 posts, read 46,063,271 times
Reputation: 47523
Speaking of iris...I've noticed some brown foliage while they are in full beautiful bloom. We did have some rather freezes, but I don't think they were up then like the daffodils. And it's not all colors. I've lost my labels so don't know which variety except they are Bearded. I will cut the brown out but wondering if anybody knows what is happening. They are only 2-3 years at the most in their present location so they don't need to be divided yet.
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