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Old 05-07-2015, 08:30 PM
 
Location: South Louisiana
584 posts, read 454,343 times
Reputation: 1348

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I have a Chinese Elm and today I see that there is bark missing off one limb an laying on the ground. The bark looks life it was pulled off in strips completely exposing the wood of the tree. Another part looks like it was hit with something and bark is missing. It is high enough in the tree that a kid could not reach and I have no kids at home. What would do that?
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Old 05-07-2015, 08:58 PM
 
Location: alabama.
2,322 posts, read 1,900,275 times
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according to ask.com chinese elms shed their bark .. i love a sycamore tree .. it sheds as well ..
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Old 05-07-2015, 10:01 PM
 
Location: South Louisiana
584 posts, read 454,343 times
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This is not shedding. The bark is stripped off and only in about a 2 foot long section and about 3 inches wide on the limb. I have seen the bark split as the tree grows but not this.
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Old 05-07-2015, 11:10 PM
 
1,566 posts, read 954,657 times
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you MIGHT be having squirrels stripping off the bark for nest building or POSSIBLY even porcupines going after the inner bark for food???
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Old 05-08-2015, 03:50 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
16,076 posts, read 12,884,366 times
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We have an apple tree that is about six inches in diameter and has had bark stirpped. From the ground level to about seven feet high three fourths of the bark is missing. I suspect a bear (first choice) or porcupines - but I really don't know. I would think that it is too much bark missing for squirrels - but I would not put that past them either. Deer would not scrape their antlers seven feet high.
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Old 05-08-2015, 04:29 AM
 
7,199 posts, read 8,808,004 times
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I've seen squirrels strip a LOT of bark off trees. My first thought when I saw the trees in a local park was that we had somehow gotten porcupines, even though porcupines don't live in this area. I later saw the actual culprits in the act which turned out to be squirrels. I'm not sure if they were going after sap or what, but they sure stripped a lot of bark off of the trees!
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Old 05-08-2015, 05:53 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
16,076 posts, read 12,884,366 times
Reputation: 12076
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackmichigan View Post
I've seen squirrels strip a LOT of bark off trees. My first thought when I saw the trees in a local park was that we had somehow gotten porcupines, even though porcupines don't live in this area. I later saw the actual culprits in the act which turned out to be squirrels. I'm not sure if they were going after sap or what, but they sure stripped a lot of bark off of the trees!
I have watched squirrels 'tap' maple trees in the Spring. I presume they do that for the sugar in the sap. I just never thought they would strip 3/4th of the bark off an apple tree.

I did film a mother bear and her cubs stripping the bark off a cedar tree several years ago. My feeling was that she was making insecticide. Immediately, after stripping the bark, she rubbed her back to that area of the tree. Since we use cedar to protect our clothes; insecticide came to my mind.

Bears are known for destroying fruit trees. But usually that is associated with their eating and being too heavy for thin limbs. We also have their territorial claw marks.
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