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Old 05-17-2015, 05:39 AM
 
2,600 posts, read 6,704,880 times
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FDA Poisonous Plant Database
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Old 05-17-2015, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
17,709 posts, read 11,257,267 times
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I think it depends on how much other food is available.

Mine made it until February.
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Old 05-17-2015, 06:39 AM
 
Location: NC
7,360 posts, read 9,179,053 times
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With that kind of a 'collection', have you considered gathering them together in a small grid then tossing a fruit netting over the top? The netting I refer to is very light weight, black, nylon(?), and is used on small fruit trees or bushes to keep birds away from the fruits. But it should work for deer as well in your situation.
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Old 05-17-2015, 06:39 AM
 
Location: LI,NY zone 7a
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Plant a pathway full of deer salad (Hosta). Never once have they touched my Rhodie, but the hosta never makes it a full year in my front yard. I can hear them licking their chops as soon as spring arrives. ;-)
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Old 05-17-2015, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,735,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Mattie Dearest. I speak from experience . I have used Irish Spring, Dial, human hair, human and coyote urine, rotten eggs, motion detectors with spray from the hose, and everything else known to mankind which is supposed to deter deer. NONE WORKED.

OP azalea and rhodie are same family and I've lost both to deer but we all know some herds have different tastes than other herds. A simple solution would be to buy some bird netting to toss over them until you can get them where they will be protected.
Deer are going to eat what they want, especially when they're hungry. I have seen deer eat rhodies, but luckily for me, they don't eat mine. They apparently prefer my tulips -- buds, stems, and leaves -- so I haven't had a tulip bloom in my front yard in about 5 years ... and I likely won't again as I've stopped planting them.
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Old 05-17-2015, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,504 posts, read 46,063,271 times
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But usually they don't eat daffodils. I naturalized about 200 daffs right at the edge of the woods and they haven't bothered them.
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Old 05-17-2015, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,473 posts, read 14,492,067 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neosec View Post
Yes, but not PJM rhododendron.
That's good to know. Also deer eat my rhodies.
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Old 05-17-2015, 08:34 AM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,419 posts, read 39,532,297 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LIcenter View Post
Plant a pathway full of deer salad (Hosta). Never once have they touched my Rhodie, but the hosta never makes it a full year in my front yard. I can hear them licking their chops as soon as spring arrives. ;-)
LOL!
I have around 25 varieties of hosta, and DH used to call it the salad bar. I am glad I figured out how to keep the deer away, as I LOVE hosta and they do well in out clay soil.
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Old 05-17-2015, 09:08 AM
 
Location: WA
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It seems they will try any fresh tender growth and then really strip the plants they like and are easy to feed on.
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Old 05-17-2015, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Floribama
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Here in the South, they seem to love the native deciduous azaleas, however they seldom touch the evergreen Indica hybrids.
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