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Old 06-09-2015, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
34,791 posts, read 16,027,527 times
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You can make sub irrigated planters out of plastic storage containers that you buy at Walmart, each one will hold 2 tomato plants and you won't have the problem of lack of root space or the plants drying out. If interested I will try to write up how to make them or find a link online.
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Old 06-09-2015, 10:13 AM
 
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So, at the very beginnign I had a back yard level problem. So I had to build a retaining wall, and get dirt delivered. I agreed with a craigslist guy to get me 5 yards of dirt. He dumped 10 yards. Then I worked hard on putting that excell away. Some went into these large (Iguess 25gal) pots. The other thing is, my side yard seem to have gravel surface (paver base without paving stones, a mistake of the previous owner) so growing anything there would only be possible in containers. I wanted to make use of this 350sqft side yard too.
I am thinking on buying these: compost, perlite, peat moss, then mix them into the soil. My dirt has clay in it, but I think not that much. Some websites say growing tomatoes in clay soil is possible with amendments. If it fails I will try groing something else, even decorative bushes or raspberry/blueberry.
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Old 06-09-2015, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
27,845 posts, read 26,448,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buenos View Post
So tomatoes require artificial soil? How did people grow tomatoes before 1978 (Home Depot was established)?
If I have to replace soil every year bought it at HD, and throw away 500LB of soil/waste... I think it kind of defeats the purpose. Growing vegetables to: save money, reduce waste (save the environment), get more fresh/ripen veggies (ok, this is still satisfied with shop-bought soil). Part of gardening would be something more sustainable then throwing away 500LB of soil every year. Part of the process would be to revitalize the soil and not throw anything away.
In the good old days, people grew vegetables in the ground. Even then, we amended the soil. We watched Crockett's Victory Garden on TV, read Organic Gardening magazine and asked the state Department of Agriculture for help.

People here have offered their advise, their pearls of wisdom, and you don't want to hear what any of them have to say. Your call. Smack some plants into pots of dirt--which look a bit small for tomato plants--and tell us how that works. Please, post photos of your bumper crop.
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Old 06-09-2015, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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Oh Man...I watched Victory Garden religiously for years. Too bad it turned into a travel show.
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Old 06-11-2015, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
75,625 posts, read 88,346,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
You can make sub irrigated planters out of plastic storage containers that you buy at Walmart, each one will hold 2 tomato plants and you won't have the problem of lack of root space or the plants drying out. If interested I will try to write up how to make them or find a link online.
This is about what we do, but we bought the large containers at Lowes and Home depot. They actually hold about 3 to 4 tomato plants. At least we are getting a heck of a lot of tomatoes and they seem to be thriving. I don't know what size storage containers you are referring to; maybe mine are too crowded.
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Old 06-11-2015, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
34,791 posts, read 16,027,527 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
This is about what we do, but we bought the large containers at Lowes and Home depot. They actually hold about 3 to 4 tomato plants. At least we are getting a heck of a lot of tomatoes and they seem to be thriving. I don't know what size storage containers you are referring to; maybe mine are too crowded.
I use 26 gallon Walmart containers, make sure they are safe for food! This youtube video shows how to make them with 18 gallon containers, same concept though. Build Your Own EarthBox-Like Self-Watering Planters

I use ordinary planter mix with 1/4 dolomite. I dump a few tablespoons of fertilizer to the hole where I am placing a plant. I can only grow two tomato plants per container because they get absolutely huge. The beauty of using these is that the roots will seek water from the bottom of the container so you can't over water. I always water from the top also for the first few weeks until the roots are substantial enough to get water from the bottom.
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Old 06-12-2015, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
75,625 posts, read 88,346,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
I use 26 gallon Walmart containers, make sure they are safe for food! This youtube video shows how to make them with 18 gallon containers, same concept though. Build Your Own EarthBox-Like Self-Watering Planters

I use ordinary planter mix with 1/4 dolomite. I dump a few tablespoons of fertilizer to the hole where I am placing a plant. I can only grow two tomato plants per container because they get absolutely huge. The beauty of using these is that the roots will seek water from the bottom of the container so you can't over water. I always water from the top also for the first few weeks until the roots are substantial enough to get water from the bottom.
I see the difference in what he was using and what I am using: though they are similar in size, ours are wider and not as deep. I think that is why we can get more plants in ours. Our plants are large and very tall now. We are loaded with tomatoes. I have to say, for my first attempt at total container gardening, so far I am very happy. We will see what I have to say in about another month or so.
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Old 06-12-2015, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,504 posts, read 46,040,583 times
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Last winter our recycling company announced they were going to roll-to-the-curb carts and that we could either keep our big bins or return them. I asked for some from neighbors, painted them in terracotta color and drilled holes. They are terrific for ornamental and edible gardening. Tomatoes, herbs so far this year but may expand next year.
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Old 06-13-2015, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
75,625 posts, read 88,346,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Last winter our recycling company announced they were going to roll-to-the-curb carts and that we could either keep our big bins or return them. I asked for some from neighbors, painted them in terracotta color and drilled holes. They are terrific for ornamental and edible gardening. Tomatoes, herbs so far this year but may expand next year.
sounds like another good way to use left over containers. Good luck. I am amazed at how many things can be used for growing our gardens. Until very recently how many of us would have even considered something like this? Sure, we might grow a few herbs this way and even some did tomatoes, but it seems like right now, the container idea is really the trendy thing.
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Old 10-27-2015, 12:15 AM
 
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I started container veggie gardening. This year only as an experiment, but from next spring I want to do it full scale.
I have 6 planters 25gallon each, plus 2 more 15gal.
End of August I started tomatoes and banana peppers from seeds indoors in cups, then early october I planted some samples outside in the big pots (1 pot 2 tomato seedlings, 1 pot 4 yellow banana-pepper seedlings). At that time the peppers were around 4x4", the tomatoes were 5x5". Now the peppers are 5x5", and the tomatoes are 12x12". The tomatoes seem to be doing fine, grew a lot, but the peppers are stagnating. Why is that? What do the peppers need more than oher plants?
Here in San Jose California we dont get freeze the whole winter, or if we do then it may be at the end of December. So my experimental plants could yield some fruits by then.


Last edited by buenos; 10-27-2015 at 12:24 AM..
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