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Old 06-14-2015, 02:27 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
24,576 posts, read 31,998,786 times
Reputation: 49738

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So far, so good. I've got some hydrangea cuttings and some rhodie cuttings started and so far, they are looking really good.

For the first time, I am using a Sterite brand storage box. The clear one with the tight fitting lime green lid. The lid on that model makes a good tight seal when the box is closed.

I got a mixture of peat moss and vermiculite to just the right degree of dampness. Cuttings were scored through the bark and dipped into rooting compound.

Every couple of days, I take the lid off and spritz the cuttings with a spray bottle of plain water. I've got some fungicide if I need it, but so far, there hasn't been any mildew.

The box is under grow lights. The top is not allowing in any light, but it gets in through the sides of the box. Temperature of the air is about 70F degrees, give or take a couple of degrees.

Hydrangeas are supposed to be easy to root, and those little rascals have all put out flowers, which I had to pinch off.

Rhodies are supposed to be tricky to root, but many of them are putting on new growth, so I am hopeful. New growth, of course, does not mean that there are roots. I'm planning on a very long time to get them rooted, so I am well prepared to wait.

I struck some fuschia cuttings, but got the soil much too damp and most of them rotted. Only one survivor out of that bunch. That was a small pot with a plastic bag fastened over it. The soil was just too wet.
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Old 06-14-2015, 02:32 PM
 
Location: McKinleyville, California
6,413 posts, read 9,403,787 times
Reputation: 4251
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
So far, so good. I've got some hydrangea cuttings and some rhodie cuttings started and so far, they are looking really good.

For the first time, I am using a Sterite brand storage box. The clear one with the tight fitting lime green lid. The lid on that model makes a good tight seal when the box is closed.

I got a mixture of peat moss and vermiculite to just the right degree of dampness. Cuttings were scored through the bark and dipped into rooting compound.

Every couple of days, I take the lid off and spritz the cuttings with a spray bottle of plain water. I've got some fungicide if I need it, but so far, there hasn't been any mildew.

The box is under grow lights. The top is not allowing in any light, but it gets in through the sides of the box. Temperature of the air is about 70F degrees, give or take a couple of degrees.

Hydrangeas are supposed to be easy to root, and those little rascals have all put out flowers, which I had to pinch off.

Rhodies are supposed to be tricky to root, but many of them are putting on new growth, so I am hopeful. New growth, of course, does not mean that there are roots. I'm planning on a very long time to get them rooted, so I am well prepared to wait.

I struck some fuschia cuttings, but got the soil much too damp and most of them rotted. Only one survivor out of that bunch. That was a small pot with a plastic bag fastened over it. The soil was just too wet.
I have tried several times to root rhododendron cuttings and at first they do seem to put on growth, then the growth stops because there are no roots to support it. I have had great luck though by doing layering, finding a branch on a rhododendron I like, then setting part of it below soil line, weighting it down with a rock over moss or soil. It takes about 3 to 6 months for this method, but it almost always works for me. Hydrangeas though do not take much coaxing to root.
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Old 06-14-2015, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,504 posts, read 46,040,583 times
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I've had very good luck with airlayers as well but always outside. Amethyst Falls Wisteria plant about 20 years old growing on a white picket fence and arbor. I took a nursery pot, filled it full of potting soil and tied it so it was resting on the support of that fence.Next placed a new growth branch at the right node in that soil, pinned it down and watched it for months. I'll share a photo if I can find it. New plant is only 6 years old and doing very well.





Also in the garden it is very simple to do the same either with a pot or on the ground for azaleas and rhoddies. After I know there is a good root system I cut it off the mother plant.
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