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Old 10-11-2015, 08:15 PM
 
3,771 posts, read 3,602,434 times
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I love four o'clocks. I have a ton of them by my back door. The smell is intoxicating in the summer. Mine are still blooming, although not as prolifically as they were a couple months ago. Fortunately, they are in a place that will be hard for them to grow beyond, so they have been relatively "tame" for years. But I have heard of them taking over yards.
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Old 10-11-2015, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Staten Island, New York
3,726 posts, read 6,710,854 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shades_of_idaho View Post
I wonder if the colors change with cross pollination? I have some very dark reds and an almost black, of course pinks from light to dark and purple and white. NYC do your pink need friends?? HA

I am expanding the hollyhock bed across the lawn backing up to neighbor. I need a barrier between us and her ranch of thistles and awful weeds. Reminds me I need to get the rust moved over there as decor before the aspens grow up so much I can not get the old plow out from between them.

My plan on the hollyhocks on the bank is next year cut them down before they set seed. I am sure they will continue to come back for a few years because they bloom on last years plants. Then that pant dies. It will be hard to cut down a flowering plant but I think this is the only way to start to gain control. the same with the dames rocket. I can let it bloom but cut it quickly. Also the Larkspur. I will get a handle on those plants.
I want more colors and will order more seeds. Do you know how to get control of the rust?
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Old 10-11-2015, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Staten Island, New York
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I guess there is a benefit to living somewhere where it gets cold in the winter. Some of these invasives can be controlled.
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Old 10-11-2015, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Gulf Coast
1,453 posts, read 1,025,522 times
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I have four o'clocks in a concrete planter, hopefully that will keep them in check. Cleome didn't do well, thank goodness, because growing up in northern state they were everywhere, seeding themselves.

Someone gave us 3 pots of trees, had seeded underneath his macadamia nut trees. Yeah, I'd like those. Gave one away to friend. Grew well for him. I planted 2, put plastic over when it got cold, took care of these and watched 2 cottonwood trees grow instead! They do have similar leaves when young. One came out during a storm (shallow roots) and the tenant won't let me get rid of the other one. It's considered invasive...

I planted honeysuckle and pulled the long tendrils over and through the lattice of our archway...until the shoots grew so thick it distorted the lattice. And for years I swept leaves out of the house and garage..they shed constantly. Was a bugger getting that all out!

I think I've planted more stuff that didn't do well or died than stuff that thrived and took over.
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Old 10-12-2015, 12:55 PM
 
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Honeysuckle. Ugh. Don't get me started. Let's just say the vines have a fondness for our holly trees.
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Old 10-12-2015, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Prescott AZ
6,817 posts, read 11,090,146 times
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Purple Ruelia, no pink, just purple. ALL OVER the yard. Just won't quit.
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Old 10-12-2015, 08:13 PM
 
74 posts, read 86,847 times
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Such a fun topic!

Mine was a moonflower vine. Two sweet little seeds--I had read of the possibilities, but planted them anyway, thinking "What can it hurt, since the freezing temps will keep it in check?" Obviously that was all the thinking I did before plopping those things in the ground in front of our white privacy fence. The result was lovely. The perfume and the beautiful white blooms were splendid! But 4 years later, I think there is still brown residue from that monster, clinging to the fence.

After frost, cutting away its cold dead body and dragging it to the compost pile was more effort than all the remaining garden required. It must have weighed 75 pounds!! And did I mention the seed pods!?! Holy cow! I spent hours making certain not a single seed remained. There have been others, many that were mentioned above, but none to compare to the moonflower.

Oh, but I forget the canna...
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Old 10-12-2015, 08:39 PM
 
Location: near bears but at least no snakes
25,633 posts, read 25,522,434 times
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Anybody want some Sedum Autumn Joy? Joyless that is.

I do like this plant but I wish it would stay where I put it and stop growing into the vegetable patch. It has to be kept constantly under control..
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Old 10-13-2015, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
1,261 posts, read 867,275 times
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So many of my favorites are on this list - black eyed susans, monarda, holly hocks, violets, mints. One of the things I love about them is that they have a mind of their own and show up where I least expect them. Because of them, my garden is constantly changing and never quite the same from year to year. I'd add coneflower and milkweed to the list, but I don't regret planting any of them.
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Old 10-13-2015, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,653 posts, read 2,659,179 times
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I remember years ago as a kid loving blue spruce trees (in Wisconsin)- the bluer the better.

My tastes have changed since then. Now when I see spruce trees in the upper mid-west, they seem "out of place" since they're not native there (even though they do well.) Rather, I'd opt for pines of some sort. They look more natural in the mid-west.
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