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Old 02-09-2008, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Iowa, Des Moines Metro
2,072 posts, read 5,186,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plains10 View Post
A Ginkgo (sp?) tree is very hearty and could be a good idea for anywhere in the Great Plains and Iowa.
The Ginko is a beautiful tree that produces a fruit that falls on the ground. The fruit falling on the ground isn't the issue with me though, it's the SMELL of it... omg... if you haven't smelled the fruit on these things rotting, you will know when you do.

Thanks though, I was just interested in the persimmon for now. Looks like I'll have to go back to where I grew up to have one though. And that's not gonna happen.
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Old 02-11-2008, 11:00 AM
 
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Default persimmon and gingko

Don't give up on the persimmon just yet! Sometimes there are cultivars that are more cold hardy, and there may be one out there for you. The bark is very interesting, and the trees have a beautiful form, IMO. I've seen them growing in the wild in the Shenandoahs of Virg. I love the fruit, although you have to wait very late into the season to eat it. I wouldn't advise planting it near driveways or especially walkways/sidewalks. I personally would stick with native persimmons vs. asian; we should favor our native trees - there's a reason they evolved here!

I had an earlier post about changing plant hardiness zones - hardiness maps are changing over time, so it's possible that in 20 more years you can plant one. Check out the link I provided, it has a really cool animation showing the changes.

Regarding gingko - a fascinating tree. It's the oldest tree in the world, evolved in an era before any other existing trees. It's often used in cities because it tolerates pollution so well. BUT - beware the fruit of the female trees! We used to walk down a street in Washington DC we called "dog doo" avenue because we always assumed that's what the smell was! If you step in the fruit you track it into your house.
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Old 02-11-2008, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Iowa, Des Moines Metro
2,072 posts, read 5,186,241 times
Reputation: 1107
Thanks for the info. Tim, however I don't see the link you tried to provide as of right now. I'll be in a computer lab tomorrow and see if it shows up on a Windows computer as I am on a Mac.

Oh and I agree about sticking to the native trees, which just simply look better in their native environment anyways... plust I like the look of the American Persimmon better than the Japanese, maybe I'm crazy but I noticed the difference in leaf/fruit size. So yes I will try to stick with North American trees, North American cars is a different story though IMO.

Ginkos are very interesting, sometimes referred to as a "modern fossil" ... or.. something to that effect, I know that's not exactly on key, but you get the point ... it's ancient. Oh and this is a fair warning for anyone reading, never touch the fruit of a ginko, the smell literally won't leave your fingers for what seems an eternity.
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Old 02-17-2008, 01:07 AM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 14,255,115 times
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google it and Im sure you would find some nurserie online that has trees that are a couple years old.
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Old 02-17-2008, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Iowa, Des Moines Metro
2,072 posts, read 5,186,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
google it and Im sure you would find some nurserie online that has trees that are a couple years old.
Well obviously I've done that, most people that use this forum for a question also "google it," but it's good to get people's opinions.

If everyone googled everything, they wouldn't need the forum.
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Old 02-17-2008, 10:02 AM
 
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Default here's the link

Quote:
Originally Posted by metro223 View Post
Thanks for the info. Tim, however I don't see the link you tried to provide as of right now. I'll be in a computer lab tomorrow and see if it shows up on a Windows computer as I am on a Mac.
Here's the link, metro:

//www.city-data.com/forum/garde...ess-zones.html

Apparently there is a better map on the way by a different organization, as discussed in that thread. But it's still interesting and demonstrates that hardiness zones are changing.
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Old 02-17-2008, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Iowa, Des Moines Metro
2,072 posts, read 5,186,241 times
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Ooo good news, I just called into a local talk radio station Gardening Show; they found the Prok Persimmon for me, grows all over the state.
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Old 02-17-2008, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Mayacama Mtns in CA
14,523 posts, read 8,219,387 times
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Thumbs up Yaaay!

Quote:
Originally Posted by metro223 View Post
Ooo good news, I just called into a local talk radio station Gardening Show; they found the Prok Persimmon for me, grows all over the state.
This is Great, Metro Your persistance has paid off. Enjoy!
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Old 02-17-2008, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Iowa, Des Moines Metro
2,072 posts, read 5,186,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Rankin View Post
Here's the link, metro:

//www.city-data.com/forum/garde...ess-zones.html

Apparently there is a better map on the way by a different organization, as discussed in that thread. But it's still interesting and demonstrates that hardiness zones are changing.
Hey Tim thanks for that link again; I've been looking at it, and I'm having a really hard time believing this. What do you think?
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Old 02-18-2008, 06:48 PM
 
1,763 posts, read 5,696,701 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by metro223 View Post
Hey Tim thanks for that link again; I've been looking at it, and I'm having a really hard time believing this. What do you think?
I don't know! I'm not sure where they got the data. Someone mentioned that there was another map with similar updates coming out, so I'm curious as to what changes it will show...but if it's true, it'll be nice for people up north who want to grow southern live oak and magnolia.

p.s. Good news about the Prok Persimmon - I thought you may find some cold-hardy variety!
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