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Old 11-23-2015, 11:28 AM
 
5,093 posts, read 1,188,882 times
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It's simple, when you plant your tomato plants, put a toothpick (or a small stick) right next to the plant. Make sure it touches the plant. A cutworm needs to be able to wrap itself around the plant completely in order to cut it. With a toothpick or small stick in-between, it can't cut.

Some people wrap aluminum foil around the stems.
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Old 11-23-2015, 04:14 PM
 
Location: On the Chesapeake
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Repost this in the Spring. I sure won't remember it nor will a bunch of others.


Having said that, nice tip.
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Old 11-23-2015, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
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We used to cut 3 or 4 inch sections of plastic soda straws and slice those sections down the side. Then we would wrap those around the young plants. But, toothpicks sound easier, if I remember in the Spring.


Actually we have not had that many (or any) cases of cutworms lately. However our garden sits surrounded by, now large, apple trees that I spray in the Spring. Between the dormant oil and then the first application of Seven we seem to have these little buggers in check. I only do the one application of Seven after the petals fall off all the flowers - I don't spray religiously all season.
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Old 11-23-2015, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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I came out into the garden one morning a few days after planting to find every single plant cut off at soil level. That was when I became best friends with diatomaceous earth.
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Old 11-24-2015, 02:31 AM
 
Location: Staten Island, New York
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OK, so why do these critters cut the plant off? do they then feed on the dying plant?
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Old 11-24-2015, 06:30 AM
 
Location: I am right here.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYChistorygal View Post
OK, so why do these critters cut the plant off? do they then feed on the dying plant?
The cutworms feed on the plant stems. As a result, the plant is severed.
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