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Old 05-28-2016, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Fayetteville NC
6,598 posts, read 6,876,822 times
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Today I was out back hacking away at my own personal Jumanji. I have a heavily wooded lot with huge old trees and lots of undergrowth. There were some nice things planted out there when I moved in, ferns, hellebores, columbine, etc, but I let it get out of control, volunteers are choking some of the more desirable things. So I cut down some 'briars'. I grew up in NC, we were always getting stuck in 'briars'. I hate em!

But after I cut, I discovered that there were some blackberries on one of them.

I've got lots more briars out there.

Would it be worth the effort to try to cultivate these briars? Maybe train them to a support of some kind and prune them in some useful way?

I
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Old 05-28-2016, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Eastern Oregon
983 posts, read 949,489 times
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If you want to cultivate berries, I strongly recommend that you buy some "tame" starts. Tame blackberries are easier to train to wires (thinner vines), have smaller thorns, have smaller seeds. There are even some cultivars that are upright - don't need wires - and are thornless. You can go to Raintree Nursery (google it - not sure if we're allowed to post links) for examples of these berries.
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Old 05-29-2016, 10:29 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
29,776 posts, read 40,662,800 times
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Himalayan bkackberries, which are the "wild" ones, are small and seedy. They are invasive and have really nasty thorns. I suggest the you get rid of them and buy some good domestic blackberries. Or maybe a few raspberry vines. Or both.
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Old 05-29-2016, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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We have three distinct varieties of wild blackberries around here. We have a small bitter variety that no one ever picks. We have a medium sized berry that's sweet and great for pies. We have a large juicy dewberry that is so sweet, plump, and juicy that it rarely makes it into a pie.
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Old 05-29-2016, 01:56 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
38,854 posts, read 69,844,065 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Himalayan bkackberries, which are the "wild" ones, are small and seedy. They are invasive and have really nasty thorns. I suggest the you get rid of them and buy some good domestic blackberries. Or maybe a few raspberry vines. Or both.
Agreed. Around here, if you want some wild blackberries just stop. The car along the road and pick all you want. You don't want them in your yard, they are terribly hard to get rid of. Buy domesticated berries, my favorite is boysenberry and they are available thornless.
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Old 05-29-2016, 03:20 PM
 
Location: LI,NY zone 7a
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Ahhhhh! they are in my backyard. Two years and I still can't get rid of them. Evil plant! )-:
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Old 05-29-2016, 04:25 PM
 
3,431 posts, read 3,927,359 times
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Blackberries are expensive, so if you like to eat them, by all means, cultivate the ones you have.

Like raspberries, they can grow wild and do fine. You will have to cut them back in early spring to let the new growth begin.

They can spread easily, though. Not as bad as rose bushes, but they can still proliferate. Keep them in check by digging up shoots that you find.

If you want to remove them entirely, you'll have to dig up all the roots. I say keep them and eat them, though.
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Old 05-31-2016, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Log "cabin" west of Bangor
7,010 posts, read 8,291,327 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa2011 View Post
Blackberries are expensive, so if you like to eat them, by all means, cultivate the ones you have.

Like raspberries, they can grow wild and do fine. You will have to cut them back in early spring to let the new growth begin.

They can spread easily, though. Not as bad as rose bushes, but they can still proliferate. Keep them in check by digging up shoots that you find.

If you want to remove them entirely, you'll have to dig up all the roots. I say keep them and eat them, though.
Or use Brush Killer on them.

I have some growing, they produce some nice, fat, juicy berries. I have let them take over a good-sized patch of land. They are great for fresh eating, and, cooked down with some sugar or honey, they make an excellent sauce for grilled meats (for an interesting bit of spice with the sweet I sometimes add a bit of my home-grown hot pepper to it).

I have wild raspberries that I've let grow too.

Be advised that some types may bear [well] only every other year, and some types need to be cut back every year. (Some bear only on old growth, some only on new growth.)
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