U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 11-01-2016, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Somewhere, out there in Zone7B
5,004 posts, read 6,876,236 times
Reputation: 4600

Advertisements

I finally put up my 6x8 soft-sided greenhouse. It's a Shelter Logic.


Grow-It 6'x8' Organic Growers Greenhouse - ShelterLogic Greenhouses | Greenhouse Megastore


Wondering if anyone has used any of the ideas out there to heat their greenhouse during the winter without using electricity, and without burning the thing down.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-02-2016, 12:25 AM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
21,173 posts, read 9,890,310 times
Reputation: 13084
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eldemila View Post
I finally put up my 6x8 soft-sided greenhouse. It's a Shelter Logic.


Grow-It 6'x8' Organic Growers Greenhouse - ShelterLogic Greenhouses | Greenhouse Megastore


Wondering if anyone has used any of the ideas out there to heat their greenhouse during the winter without using electricity, and without burning the thing down.
I have two of these myself, and find them very handy.

BUT - no way can you heat one w/out electricity. They are far too small, not enough thermal mass.

Where do you live, and what do you want these "greenhouses" to do for you?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2016, 05:43 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
33,134 posts, read 60,168,031 times
Reputation: 36634
I use an oil filled radiator type heater, very safe plugged into a gfi outlet. No exposed heating elements, no fan. Heat without electricity is possible but gas heat is bad for the plants, wood burning stove or pellet stove is not safe or practical.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2016, 08:37 AM
Status: "Remember what the Dormouse said Feed your head" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Bel Air, California
22,833 posts, read 24,035,270 times
Reputation: 36030
have looked in to a lot of options with my new Palram polycarbonate greenhouse.


One of the most intriguing options that would require no electricity is the use of thermal mass that warms up during the day and releases it's heat at night. If you had enough room, 2 or 3 black plastic barrels filled with water would likely keep temps above freezing with outdoor temperatures in the mid-twenties. Another option for more confined space would be to use 5 gal buckets stacked on top of each other along a wall. Of course the problem would be to find enough space for these but incorporating them below shelves may make use of limited space.





Another option that would be worth exploring more might be a solar pop can furnace which really gets incredible temperatures out of a simple and inexpensive design. The idea of course would be to build the day time temperature up high enough to be able to coast thru the cold nighttime. Many videos on you tube out there, here is just one of them.


Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2016, 10:33 AM
 
19,175 posts, read 58,262,187 times
Reputation: 34752
"Adjustable vented end panels and full-length screens mean maximum cross aeration and temperature control"

Are you SERIOUS???

Other than setting it up in your living room, your quest is a lost cause. That item is closer to being a shade house than a greenhouse.

Back when gardens and such were vital, greenhouses were sunk about three or four feet into the ground to take advantage of the thermal mass of the earth, with some having double glazing to slow heat loss a little.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2016, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
21,173 posts, read 9,890,310 times
Reputation: 13084
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
have looked in to a lot of options with my new Palram polycarbonate greenhouse.


One of the most intriguing options that would require no electricity is the use of thermal mass that warms up during the day and releases it's heat at night. If you had enough room, 2 or 3 black plastic barrels filled with water would likely keep temps above freezing with outdoor temperatures in the mid-twenties. Another option for more confined space would be to use 5 gal buckets stacked on top of each other along a wall. Of course the problem would be to find enough space for these but incorporating them below shelves may make use of limited space.


Another option that would be worth exploring more might be a solar pop can furnace which really gets incredible temperatures out of a simple and inexpensive design. The idea of course would be to build the day time temperature up high enough to be able to coast thru the cold nighttime. Many videos on you tube out there, here is just one of them.
Yes, these methods can work in a properly sited structure that is designed to take advantage of them.

They are not going to work in a 48 sq ft non-sheltered space that is enclosed with a single layer of poly.

OP hasn't responded with her/his location or purpose in using a greenhouse. But for anyone else who is interested, there is a lot of useful and field-tested info out there. There's also a lot of pie-in-the-sky experiments.

Here's three sources I would trust, because they've been doing it for a long time -

https://www.amazon.com/Winter-Harves...lliott+coleman

https://www.amazon.com/Forest-Garden...ome+osentowski

http://www.themodernhomestead.us/art...reenhouse.html

I'll also point out that while a greenhouse is wonderful, a good one is not cheap. Depending on your purpose, you might find other ways of doing what you want to do with smaller structures. Here's a couple of good sources about that - again, from people who've been doing it for a long time -

https://www.amazon.com/Solar-Gardeni...olar+gardening

https://www.amazon.com/Intensive-Gar...ing+year-round

Last edited by jacqueg; 11-02-2016 at 11:10 AM..
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2016, 11:23 AM
Status: "Remember what the Dormouse said Feed your head" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Bel Air, California
22,833 posts, read 24,035,270 times
Reputation: 36030
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
"Adjustable vented end panels and full-length screens mean maximum cross aeration and temperature control"

Are you SERIOUS???

Other than setting it up in your living room, your quest is a lost cause. That item is closer to being a shade house than a greenhouse.

Back when gardens and such were vital, greenhouses were sunk about three or four feet into the ground to take advantage of the thermal mass of the earth, with some having double glazing to slow heat loss a little.

apparently the OP is in South Carolina not the South Pole
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2016, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Somewhere, out there in Zone7B
5,004 posts, read 6,876,236 times
Reputation: 4600
Thanks for the replies. I'm sorry I didn't jump in quicker than 11 hours with a reply here, was out working in my garden, at friends house, etc.


I asked because I wanted to see if anyone had some solutions, and I did find some interesting options, Ghengis, I saw those two videos you posted earlier today.


I have a tiny "reach-in" greenhouse and it gets quite hot, but I can't fit much in there. I bought this GH 3 years ago and just got had a chance to put it up. Was just thinking if there was some way to bring the heat up at night when needed and wanted to know first hand. And yes Ghengis, I am in SC. Zone 7b


There are actually quite a few ideas out there, two like Ghengis mentioned, that actually sounds good. I have seen a house that has bottles of water around all the plants in my area and it appears to work for that person, though it doesn't look very good in their yard.


I don't have the option to do any type of electricity, nor would I want to. I'll surely come up with something with the searching. Was just wondering if anyone had any knowledge first hand from doing it.


Thanks all!
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2016, 11:53 PM
 
19,175 posts, read 58,262,187 times
Reputation: 34752
"Somewhere out there" for a location is not one I'm going to bother to spend time trying to figure out. I'm probably further south and had both a large greenhouse and a small green shelving cabinet I made. Supplemental heat was required for both.

Sometimes I think it would be easier to just be quiet and let people learn the ugly truth on their own after spending beaucoup money and time and then losing plants. It gets tiring being shot as the messenger and the pay sucks.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2016, 08:46 AM
Status: "Remember what the Dormouse said Feed your head" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Bel Air, California
22,833 posts, read 24,035,270 times
Reputation: 36030
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eldemila View Post
Thanks for the replies. I'm sorry I didn't jump in quicker than 11 hours with a reply here, was out working in my garden, at friends house, etc.


I asked because I wanted to see if anyone had some solutions, and I did find some interesting options, Ghengis, I saw those two videos you posted earlier today.


I have a tiny "reach-in" greenhouse and it gets quite hot, but I can't fit much in there. I bought this GH 3 years ago and just got had a chance to put it up. Was just thinking if there was some way to bring the heat up at night when needed and wanted to know first hand. And yes Ghengis, I am in SC. Zone 7b


There are actually quite a few ideas out there, two like Ghengis mentioned, that actually sounds good. I have seen a house that has bottles of water around all the plants in my area and it appears to work for that person, though it doesn't look very good in their yard.


I don't have the option to do any type of electricity, nor would I want to. I'll surely come up with something with the searching. Was just wondering if anyone had any knowledge first hand from doing it.


Thanks all!

you may also want to look into bubble wrap for insulating the greenhouse, there are some greenhouse suppliers that have these that clearer than the normal shipping bubble wrap and would allow more light and heat thru.


Charley's Greenhouse & Garden Greenhouse Bubble Insulation - 1 Roll 24& 34 x 40 ft. 80 sq ft

Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
"Somewhere out there" for a location is not one I'm going to bother to spend time trying to figure out. I'm probably further south and had both a large greenhouse and a small green shelving cabinet I made. Supplemental heat was required for both.

Sometimes I think it would be easier to just be quiet and let people learn the ugly truth on their own after spending beaucoup money and time and then losing plants. It gets tiring being shot as the messenger and the pay sucks.

QFT, good advice to heed
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top