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Old 10-12-2018, 03:24 PM
 
Location: NJ
343 posts, read 229,649 times
Reputation: 1216

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I have a very small yard that is fenced in. I do animal rescue and had a litter of kittens pass away this week. It is a terrible thing and my husband and I are truly heartbroken beyond what we previously have had to cope with. We've never had a rescue animal die so having a whole litter go was beyond awful. We want to memorialize them in our yard. I'm just afraid to plant something only to have that plant die next spring. I'd really like to have a no-brainer plant there.

Since moving into our home we haven't done so much landscaping. We do veggies but haven't added any long-term plants other than perennial old-fashioned standard flowers. I'd prefer to go with a smallish shrub or plant- not really a perennial flower but something hardy and low maintenance. Our summers go from cold and wet to hot and dry. To be honest I really want something I can plant and then not have to dig up and separate for a good number of years. We are in Zone 7a/ 7b. If it had fall/ winter appeal it'd be even better. Since the litter died in October I'd like the plant to look nice in October.

The problem is that our area is very small- postage stamp small. We have a lot of hydrangeas that do ok here but our azaleas suffer. The spot I'm thinking of gets morning sun but is not full sun. I feel we have enough hydrangeas and hastas. One more would not be special.

I really don't mind if it's not going to get lovely or beautiful smelling flowers- I just want something that will (once established) tolerate drought and wet conditions and not grow bigger than 5-6 feet high or grow much more than 2 1/2- 3 feet in radius. Anything more would be too big for our yard. I'd also like it to be easy to control as there are enough lovely plants here that want to seed and spread (Roses of Sharon) that keep me busy with pulling and weeding seedlings all over the property.

I have always wanted a ninebark but I think it'd get too big. I do love fall interest plants. Any suggestions are welcome.
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Old 10-12-2018, 04:19 PM
 
6,150 posts, read 4,514,052 times
Reputation: 13773
Go to this site: https://www.provenwinners.com I used to "garden" on a postage stamp size terrace on the 26th floor of a Manhattan skyscraper and if it says proven winners, I trust it to last. I couldn't always get what I wanted near me, but the ones I did get (usually annuals) did great. Use the search options to narrow down what you need.

Thanks for fostering, and I'm very sorry about your kittens. If you find the right plant, please post pictures.
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Old 10-12-2018, 05:04 PM
 
4,739 posts, read 10,440,815 times
Reputation: 4192
My first thought is the perennial plant catnip, which is about the right size, drought-tolerant, and blooms from late Spring to Autumn. Plus, it's catnip!
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Old 10-12-2018, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Northern California
130,290 posts, read 12,099,804 times
Reputation: 39037
I am sorry for your loss, I know how hard it can be. When we lost an adult cat, we got a stone cat, like this one except ours has wings on it.
https://www.ltdcommodities.com/Pets/...hoCwS8QAvD_BwE

link shows a dog one, but you can click the drop down for a photo of a cat one


We also planted a rose bush for each cat we have lost. But roses grow Ok in our small yard. I would suggest going to a local nursery ( not a big box one) & ask which plants thrive in your particular area.
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Old 10-12-2018, 07:08 PM
Status: "I don't understand. But I don't care, so it works out." (set 7 days ago)
 
35,629 posts, read 17,961,729 times
Reputation: 50652
Does it really need to be a shrub, or could it be a little stone statue? This one is beautiful.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/SLEEPING-CA...-/252460587305
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Old 10-12-2018, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Canada
14,735 posts, read 15,038,045 times
Reputation: 34871
If you want something that won't take up too much height or width in a small space, perhaps some kind of dwarf weeping shrub? Just for example -


dwarf weeping Japanese larch: https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...arch&FORM=IGRE


dwarf weeping pussywillow: https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...879729FB846996


dwarf weeping Japanese laceleaf maple: https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...88B360FC41FAC3


selection of others: https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...rubs&FORM=IGRE


.
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Old 10-12-2018, 09:12 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
3,057 posts, read 2,034,410 times
Reputation: 11353
In a small yard think of a vertical plant. A smallish tree like a weeping maple (suggested above) is good.
I always like to plant on the perimeter (property line) because mowing around single plants is annoying.
Consider planting something that appeals to butterflies or bees or birds. Maybe a small butterfly garden of perennial plants.
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Old 10-12-2018, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,813 posts, read 32,500,469 times
Reputation: 38576
I'd sprinkle their ashes onto the ground, and buy a nice little stone memorial that won't die.

https://www.google.com/search?q=pet+...w=1440&bih=749
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Old 10-13-2018, 02:28 AM
 
Location: Here and now.
11,904 posts, read 5,586,521 times
Reputation: 12963
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post
My first thought is the perennial plant catnip, which is about the right size, drought-tolerant, and blooms from late Spring to Autumn. Plus, it's catnip!
I love to grow catnip in a container, but it can spread like crazy, and it also...wait for it...attracts cats, something that may not be appreciated in a garden.

I kind of agree with the stone statue idea.
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Old 10-13-2018, 03:46 PM
 
6,867 posts, read 4,863,645 times
Reputation: 26431
Some species of fuchsia get shrub sized. I am thinking of the ones with the tiny flowers. They should still have flowers in October.

Thank you for doing rescue work. I am sorry the kittens didn't make it, but at least you tried.
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